7.1/10
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1,034 user 217 critic

Chicago (2002)

PG-13 | | Comedy, Crime, Musical | 24 January 2003 (USA)
Trailer
1:55 | Trailer
Two death-row murderesses develop a fierce rivalry while competing for publicity, celebrity, and a sleazy lawyer's attention.

Director:

Rob Marshall

Writers:

Bill Condon (screenplay), Bob Fosse (book) | 2 more credits »
Popularity
1,714 ( 267)
Won 6 Oscars. Another 51 wins & 129 nominations. See more awards »

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
Taye Diggs ... Bandleader
Cliff Saunders ... Stage Manager
Catherine Zeta-Jones ... Velma Kelly
Renée Zellweger ... Roxie Hart
Dominic West ... Fred Casely
Jayne Eastwood ... Mrs. Borusewicz
Bruce Beaton ... Police Photographer
Roman Podhora Roman Podhora ... Sergeant Fogarty
John C. Reilly ... Amos Hart
Colm Feore ... Harrison
Rob Smith Rob Smith ... Newspaper Photographer
Sean Wayne Doyle Sean Wayne Doyle ... Reporter
Steve Behal Steve Behal ... Prison Clerk
Robbie Rox Robbie Rox ... Prison Guard
Chita Rivera ... Nickie
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Storyline

Murderesses Velma Kelly (Catherine Zeta-Jones) (a chanteuse and tease who killed her husband and sister after finding them in bed together) and Roxie Hart (Renée Zellweger) (who killed her boyfriend when she discovered he wasn't going to make her a star) find themselves on death row together and fight for the fame that will keep them from the gallows in 1920s Chicago. Written by Debpp322

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Taglines:

The one movie that has it all. See more »

Genres:

Comedy | Crime | Musical

Motion Picture Rating (MPAA)

Rated PG-13 for sexual content and dialogue, violence and thematic elements | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

View content advisory »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

The translated speech by Hunyak (Ekaterina Chtchelkanova) is: "How did I find myself here? They say my famous lover (neighbor?) held down my husband and I cut his head off. But it's not true. I am innocent. I don't know why Uncle Sam says I did it. I tried to explain at the police station but they didn't understand." The original, in Hungarian: "Mit keresek én itt? Azt mondják, a híres lakóm lefogta a férjem, én meg lecsaptam a fejét. De nem igaz. Én ártatlan vagyok. Nem tudom, miért mondja Uncle Sam, hogy én voltam. Próbáltam a rendõrségen megmagyarázni, de nem értették meg." See more »

Goofs

Flynn is heard on Roxie's radio saying "This all took place on Lake Shore Drive?" Lake Shore Drive wasn't built until 1937 and wasn't even called Lake Shore Drive until 1946. See more »

Quotes

Matron Mama Morton: They say that life is tit for tat, and that's the way I live... so I deserve a lotta tat for what I've got to give.
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Crazy Credits

Near the end of the credits, just so there are no doubts: Catherine Zeta-Jones' singing and dancing performed by Catherine Zeta-Jones Renée Zellweger's singing and dancing performed by Renée Zellweger Richard Gere's singing and dancing performed by Richard Gere See more »

Alternate Versions

The musical number "Class," featuring Queen Latifah and Catherine Zeta-Jones, was deleted from the final version of the film. However, it was recut into the movie for a brief, extremely limited theatrical re-release in the summer of 2003. It then appeared on DVD as a bonus feature, but was NOT intercut there. See more »

Connections

Referenced in Tvoje tvár má známý hlas: Episode #3.7 (2017) See more »

Soundtracks

Cell Block Tango
(1975)
Music by John Kander
Lyrics by Fred Ebb
Performed by Catherine Zeta-Jones, Susan Misner, Denise Faye, Deidre Goodwin, Ekaterina Chtchelkanova, and Mya (as Mýa Harrison)
Published by Unichappell Music, Inc. (BMI)
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User Reviews

Murder, music, media, and all that jazz
12 January 2003 | by divaclvSee all my reviews

Fictional characters, as a whole, get away with more than is permissible in reality. They do things we would never condone in our peers, yet still manage to elicit our sympathy. Maybe it's a form of catharsis--instead of inflicting violence on other people, we watch someone onscreen do so and cheer them on. Such is the case with "Chicago"--the film features a large rogue's gallery of criminals, con men, and crooks, yet most of these are surprisingly likeable. And yet, the urge to root for the bad guys is somewhat unsettling, for "Chicago" is a story about people beating the rap by manipulating the public, illiciting their sympathy and playing on their deep-seated need for the bizarre and bloody.

Told one way, the story of "Chicago" sounds like a showbusiness drama: a young girl dreams of stardom. She is initailly naive but learns quickly, rising into the blaze of limelight while an older, more experienced rival resents the new face that's stealing the show. The twist is that the art is murder, and the stage is comprised of the papers, the radio, the courthouse, and the all-devouring public eye. The veteran is Velma Kelly (Catherine Zeta-Jones), a nightclub singer who did in her husband and sister after finding them in what is usually called "a compromising position." The newcomer is Roxie Hart (Renee Zelweiger), a cutie-pie who shot her lover after finding out he was using her, and who expects her husband Amos (John C. Reilly, excellent as the quintessentail doormat) to stand by her afterwards. Both women are represented by Billy Flynn (Richard Gere), who brags he can beat any rap for the right price and is probably what Shakespeare had in mind when he made that crack about killing all the lawyers. Flynn's formula is simple: turn the client into a media darling, spin a tragic tale of the good girl ruined by bad choices, and an aquittal is certain.

"Chicago" is a musical, and the film uses a gimmick of establishing two worlds: the real Chicago and a surreal fantasy world in the form of a Jazz-Age theater, where the song and dance takes place. In many musicals this wouldn't work, but here it makes sense. Director Rob Marshall fuses the two worlds together very well, creating images that compliment each other effectively. Some of the concepts look like things you'd see in an editorial cartoon: a press conference becomes a ventroliquist act and puppet show, a trial is depicted as a literal circus. Others offer a reflection of the character's inner self: Amos, in the guise of a baggy-pants comic, bemoans the fact that, like all second banannas, nobody really notices him--even the fantasy audience seems indifferent to his performance (which is, in truth, wonderful).

The ensemble all turns in excellent performances in the acting category, but the singing is more uneven. Zeta-Jones has by far the best voice of the leads, as exemplified by the casually sensual "All That Jazz." Zelweiger is passable, mostly because one gets the impression that her Roxie has more charm and determination than actual talent. Gere only barely manages with the music, and does so mainly on the grounds that Billy Flynn isn't one of the more vocally difficult roles in the music theater cannon. But what he lacks in pipes he makes up for in the character department: his Flynn is a perfectly charismatic scoundrel, one whose talent and danger is in his ability to be so charming. Taye Diggs, who presides over the dream world as the Bandleader, doesn't get to sing, which is a shame because he can--he was in the original cast of "Rent"--but works very well with what he's given.

The mix of glitter and grime in "Chicago" is reminicent of last year's "Moulin Rouge," but those who thought the latter too excessive will probably find this one more appealing. Any fan of music theater, however, will not want to miss this film--it may just be the rebirth of the movie musical we've been hearing about.


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Frequently Asked Questions

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Details

Official Sites:

Official Facebook | Official site

Country:

USA | Germany | Canada | UK

Language:

English | Hungarian

Release Date:

24 January 2003 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

Chicago: The Musical See more »

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Box Office

Budget:

$45,000,000 (estimated)

Opening Weekend USA:

$2,074,929, 29 December 2002

Gross USA:

$170,687,518

Cumulative Worldwide Gross:

$306,776,732
See more on IMDbPro »

Company Credits

Show more on IMDbPro »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

DTS | Dolby Digital | SDDS

Color:

Black and White (mock newsreel)| Color

Aspect Ratio:

1.85 : 1
See full technical specs »

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