5.9/10
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1 user 1 critic

L'Ilya (2001)

Meet L'ILYA, a young video artist who documents peoples' suicides and projects their final moments out of context in trendy clubs. Due to the film being a "moyen metrage" (or "medium-length... See full summary »

Director:

Tomoya Sato

Writer:

Tomoya Sato
Reviews
1 nomination. See more awards »

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Cast

Cast overview:
Shino Ogihara Shino Ogihara ... Ilya
Tasuku Yamanouchi Tasuku Yamanouchi ... Ilya's lover
Ryoko Yukami Ryoko Yukami ... Woman who commits suicide
Kazuko Okada Kazuko Okada ... Mother of Ilya's lover
Kyoko Katsuta Kyoko Katsuta ... The promoter
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Storyline

Meet L'ILYA, a young video artist who documents peoples' suicides and projects their final moments out of context in trendy clubs. Due to the film being a "moyen metrage" (or "medium-length feature," meaning, as the name implies, a film whose running time is too long to be classified as a short yet too short to be presented as a feature), L'ILYA has had enormous difficulty getting seen, even on the festival circuit. It has nonetheless left scars wherever shown. This film will haunt your memory long after the obituaries fade.

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Genres:

Short | Drama

Certificate:

Not Rated
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Details

Official Sites:

Official site [Japan]

Country:

Japan

Language:

Japanese

Release Date:

29 July 2001 (Canada) See more »

Company Credits

Show more on IMDbPro »

Technical Specs

Color:

Color

Aspect Ratio:

1.37 : 1
See full technical specs »

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User Reviews

 
Daring
18 September 2001 | by christian94See all my reviews

Suicide is a touchy subject. When in the first few minutes of the film, there is someone jumping off a building, another hanging himself at home, yet another slicing her veins open, and a young man with a gun in his mouth hesitant to do it, you wonder if someone should show this on film. You can imagine that they are scenes pretty hard to watch. Off course the hand-held camera and the nice, but passive woman who documents all this for us don't help to distance ourselves from this cultural plague.

You later see the silent images of people killing themselves playing on large screens as background in a lounge. Is this art? Did we go too far? What drives those people to do this?

The writer/director, Tomoya Sato, has always had the thought of death looming over him. "I think of death all the time" he said at the special Montreal screening. He attempts to answer some questions and to take a good look at this widespread phenomenon. Restricting himself to a more personal perspective of different individuals rather than analyzing the society that harbors it, he captures the essence of this difficult subject matter. You know from the start though, that he will end up raising more questions than he will answer.

Good effort. 7/10


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