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Dracula 

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0:57 | Trailer
Bram Stoker's classic is given a frightful telling, as an attractive, ambitious group of 30-year-olds travel through Hungary looking for lucrative deals, unaware of the horrific threat hanging over their lives.
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1  
2002  

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Cast

Series cast summary:
Patrick Bergin ...  Dracula / ... 2 episodes, 2002
Hardy Krüger Jr. ...  Jonathan Harker 2 episodes, 2002
Stefania Rocca ...  Mina 2 episodes, 2002
Muriel Baumeister ...  Lucy 2 episodes, 2002
Kai Wiesinger ...  Dr. Seward 2 episodes, 2002
Alessio Boni ...  Quincy 2 episodes, 2002
Conrad Hornby Conrad Hornby ...  Arthur Holmwood 2 episodes, 2002
Brett Forest Brett Forest ...  Roenfield 2 episodes, 2002
Alessia Merz Alessia Merz ...  Fair Woman 2 episodes, 2002
Piroska Kiss Piroska Kiss ...  Dark Woman 2 episodes, 2002
István Göz István Göz ...  Male Nurse 2 episodes, 2002
Barna Illyés Barna Illyés ...  Border Guard 2 episodes, 2002
Csaba Pethes Csaba Pethes ...  Captain of the Tug 2 episodes, 2002
Balázs Tardy Balázs Tardy ...  Tug Crew Member 1 2 episodes, 2002
Levente Törköly Levente Törköly ...  Tug Crew Member 2 2 episodes, 2002
Ilona Kassai Ilona Kassai ...  Woman at the Hotel 2 episodes, 2002
Imola Gáspár ...  Woman at the Manor 2 episodes, 2002
Giancarlo Giannini ...  Dr. Enrico Valenzi 2 episodes, 2002
Csilla Bakonyi Csilla Bakonyi 2 episodes, 2002
Petra Hauman Petra Hauman 2 episodes, 2002
Tibor Kenderesi Tibor Kenderesi 2 episodes, 2002
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Storyline

Bram Stoker's classic is given a frightful telling, as an attractive, ambitious group of 30-year-olds travel through Hungary looking for lucrative deals, unaware of the horrific threat hanging over their lives.

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Taglines:

Death is only the beginning. See more »

Genres:

Drama | Horror

Motion Picture Rating (MPAA)

Rated R for some violence and sexuality | See all certifications »
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Did You Know?

Goofs

After it is discovered that Lucy is missing, the group is discussing what has happened and Jonathan is standing behind a window in which two crewmembers are reflected. See more »

Connections

Version of Dracula (1979) See more »

User Reviews

Surprisingly faithful adaptation of Bram Stoker's novel "Dracula" -- deserves better attention!
8 July 2004 | by insightstraightSee all my reviews

Dracula is a major presence in our house (along with his relatives the Mummy, the Wolf Man, Frankenstein, zombies, ...) I cannot claim to have seen all of the many films which are descendants of Bram Stoker's original work -- the "Dracula" name has been applied to everything from sex farce to psychological allegory, and some of it is pure trash. But we have seen more than our share of not only Dracula movies but also vampire movies in general, as well as any number of play adaptations.

It seems that most Dracula movies are not adaptations of the book, but rather adaptations of previous movies. Admittedly, the book is devilishly hard to stage/film, as it is structured as a series of excerpts from journals, difficult to weave into a consistent narrative flow. But one often gets the impression that the directors (or screenwriters!) of some of the films haven't bothered to read Stoker's novel, contenting themselves with merely screening some previous efforts.

So it is always with some trepidation we watch a new "Dracula" film, bracing ourselves for yet another schlock assault with only passing connection to the original. (Not that we are against schlock per se -- only when it masquerades to deceive.) Frankly, the cover art and copy of "Dracula's Curse" didn't give us much hope of quality.

Thus, we were pleasantly surprised to find that it is a well-appointed, thoughtful, and reasonably faithful version of Bram Stoker's book. Obviously, the production team had not only read the book but understood it, and labored to bring it to the screen as accurately as possible. In this, it stands head and shoulders above most "true to the novel" versions, including Coppola's (don't get me started on *that* one...)

The film does strike several sour notes -- the flying effects are in my opinion quite overused, and in fact unnecessary -- and at several points is at odds with tradition. (Vampiric insensitivity to sunlight will jar most people.) But many of these "traditions" are actually creations of earlier films, as careful reading of the novel will show. The ending is also rather rushed, as though the production was running out of money and could not afford the chase across Europe to save Mina.

The multinational cast does take a bit of getting used to, with as many accents as there are actors. But even this is true to the spirit of Stoker, who inserted an "exotic" American and the European Van Helsing into his story to lend it an international flavor.

Some of the casting plays against movie convention; Dracula (Patrick Bergin) in particular is at odds with what many people expect of the bloodsucking count. He looks far more authentically Romanian than any other Dracula we have seen (like a cross between Robert Goulet, Harvey Keitel, and Lech Walesa). Unfortunately, as the "aged" Dracula he looks distractingly like Scots comic actor Billy Connolly. But he has appropriate menace as well as some regal bearing, and is closer to Stoker's description than most.

The film is set in the present day, but by clever and deft scripting allows whole sections to feel as though they are set during Stoker's time. The locations and settings are sumptuous; the film makes very effective use of Budapest scenery to set the mood. Great care was obviously taken to achieve interesting camera angles.

And more of Stoker's dialogue is present than in perhaps any other version of the story, including the Louis Jourdan mini-series.

For someone who has only seen other "Dracula" movies, this one may seem slow and overstated. But to anyone who has read the book and enjoyed it, this movie is a refreshing attempt to bring Bram Stoker's original vision to the screen. Rather than rely on gratuitous gore and nudity, this production builds on mood and a fluid sensuality. Just as Stoker intended.


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Details

Country:

Italy | Germany

Language:

Italian | English

Release Date:

2002 (Italy) See more »

Also Known As:

Dracula's Curse See more »

Filming Locations:

Hungary See more »

Company Credits

Show more on IMDbPro »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

(DVD) | (2 part TV-miniseries)

Sound Mix:

Stereo

Color:

Color

Aspect Ratio:

1.33 : 1
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