The twins of Paul "Muad'dib" Atreides become embroiled in the political landscape of Arrakis ("Dune") and the rest of the universe.
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1  
2003  
Won 1 Primetime Emmy. Another 8 nominations. See more awards »

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Cast

Series cast summary:
Alec Newman ...  Muad'Dib / ... 3 episodes, 2003
Julie Cox ...  Irulan Corrino-Atreides 3 episodes, 2003
Ian McNeice ...  Baron Vladimir Harkonnen 3 episodes, 2003
Steven Berkoff ...  Stilgar 3 episodes, 2003
Daniela Amavia ...  Alia Atreides 3 episodes, 2003
James McAvoy ...  Leto Atreides II 3 episodes, 2003
Susan Sarandon ...  Princess Wensicia Corrino 3 episodes, 2003
Edward Atterton ...  Duncan Idaho 3 episodes, 2003
P.H. Moriarty ...  Guerney Halleck / ... 3 episodes, 2003
Alice Krige ...  Lady Jessica Atreides 1 episode, 2003
Jessica Brooks ...  Ghanima Atreides 2 episodes, 2003
Rik Young ...  Javid 2 episodes, 2003
Jonathan Bruun Jonathan Bruun ...  Farad'n Corrino 2 episodes, 2003
Karel Dobrý ...  Korba 2 episodes, 2003
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Storyline

The twins of Paul "Muad'dib" Atreides become embroiled in the political landscape of Arrakis ("Dune") and the rest of the universe.

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Taglines:

The saga of Dune is far from over... See more »


Certificate:

Unrated | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

View content advisory »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

Brian Tyler's music for this miniseries is used regularly in movie trailers, e.g. The Golden Compass (2007), Indiana Jones and the Kingdom of the Crystal Skull (2008) or Master and Commander: The Far Side of the World (2003). See more »

Goofs

In the beginning of Part 2 (The Children), when we first see Leto, his eyes are completely normal. But when the camera turns back to him, his eyes have the bright blue tint from the spice. See more »

Quotes

Wensicia: You insolent bastard!
Farad'n Corrino: Let's not discuss your weaknesses now, mother.
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User Reviews

 
The sequel is never the equal?
16 March 2003 | by tkwhSee all my reviews

Satisfying, well-written and superbly acted sequel to the Sci-Fi Channel's DUNE mini-series - which was itself vastly superior to the rampant-phallic-symbolism-held-together-by-stamp-hinges-and-cobwebs David Lynch film version. A science fiction hybrid of sword-wielding Old Testament prophets, LAWRENCE OF ARABIA, Toho giant-monsters-on-the-rampage flicks and the precepts of the 1970s ecological movement, CHILDREN OF DUNE is a storytelling and visual delight. F/X maestro Ernest Farino, who won the Emmy for his sterling work on the first DUNE mini-series, will likely make a repeat stroll to the podium when next year's visual effects award is handed out. He has created worlds and civilisations and creatures that are at once alien and familiar, wildly imaginative yet rooted in reality. Barring a ticket on the next space shuttle flight, this is the closest you will ever get to other worlds: Farino's effects are genuinely that good. In a production where all of the cast and crew clearly went beyond what their paycheques required of them, Farino's contributions are particularly satisfying. All in all, a magnificent undertaking; this is what that irritating salesman guest in FAWLTY TOWERS meant when he was talking about "televisual feasts."


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Details

Official Sites:

Official Site

Country:

Germany | USA

Language:

English | French

Release Date:

16 March 2003 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

Frank Herbert's Children of Dune See more »

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Box Office

Budget:

$20,000,000 (estimated)
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Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

(3 parts) | (2004) (cut) | (3 episodes) | (Entire series)

Sound Mix:

Dolby Digital

Color:

Color

Aspect Ratio:

1.78 : 1
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