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The Triplets of Belleville (2003) Poster

Trivia

Among the anti-Disney riffs in the film are a Mickey-shaped turd in a toilet, and a wallet-picture of a character in Disneyland with a lollipop that says SUCKER.
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A caricatured Django Reinhardt playing guitar can be seen early in the black and white portion of the film. As in reality, the cartoon uses only two fingers to play, due to a burn suffered in 1928. Eventually, he brings his foot up and plays with his toes. The film's soundtrack sounds as though it was greatly influenced by Django's music (and he recorded a song called Belleville with Stéphane Grappelli).
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There is also an animated caricature of dancer/singer/performer Josephine Baker, a black American entertainer who left the U.S. in the 1920s to escape its virulent racism, and became a tremendous star in Europe. She was very famous in Paris, and often appeared in shows half-nude, the way she's represented in this film.
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In the beginning of the movie, when they're watching TV, there's an equation in the bottom of the screen. These are Albert Einstein's Field Equations and represent the gravitational effects produced by a given mass.
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"Roberte Rivette", the accordionist who plays her instrument atop a truck while following the cyclists in the Tour de France, represents Yvette Horner, the mega-selling artist who still records albums and plays her accordion to large crowds in France. Horner recently described her own exfperiences as very similar to those of "Roberte Rivette" in "Les Triplettes de Belleville": she continued playing her accordeon along the Tour de France route with a big smile as insects ceaselessly were caught in her teeth.
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The yellow-jerseyed leader of the Tour de France depicted in the film is a caricature of five-time tour winner Jacques Anquetil. It would appear that the year is 1957, the year of Anquetil's first win and the only year he participated which featured a stage finish in Marseilles.
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The pianist Mme. Souza and young Champion are watching on television is a caricature of the famous Canadian virtuoso, Glenn Gould, known for his piano interpretations of Johann Sebastian Bach's keyboard works and for the fact that he would hum along as he played the piano (which can be heard in the film).
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Visible in their apartment are pictures of the Triplets with some period stars including Charles Chaplin, there's also a picture of the Triplets on the beach with Olive Oyl.
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In bonus footage on the DVD of this film, the director, Sylvain Chomet, indicates that he tried to imitate the stance and walk of tall basketball stars in the triplets.
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The president seen giving an official television address, asking his fellow citizens to cheer on the cyclist, is French statesman Charles de Gaulle (1890-1970), reinforcing the idea that this movie is set in the 1950s.
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The song heard in the background of the barbershop sequence (listed as the "Barber Song" in the closing credits) has lyrics in Italian, which are actually complete non-sequitur gibberish referring to food, clothing, Federico Fellini movies and other words that a non-speaker of Italian would find difficult to follow.
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The song performed by Madame Souza in the piano is called Uma Casa Portuguesa (A Portuguese House), and was originally performed by Amália Rodrigues, the queen of Fado music.
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The bicycles are all computer generated and traced, because the director, Sylvain Chomet, did not believe it was worth the time to get the look of the bicycles "perfect". The figures on the bicycles, however, were only thin lines in the computer generated originals, allowing the animators to breathe life into them.
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All cars used in the movie are Citroën. This ties in with the joke that the cars cannot turn corners.
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Also appearing in the starting black and white part of the movie, appears French singer Charles Trenet (1913-2001) with his eyes wide open as he used to do when acting in cabarets.
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The music heard on the soundtrack as Mme. Souza and Bruno follow the ocean liner is from the opening movement (Kyrie) of Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart's Mass in C minor.
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The equation which features on an opening screen, R(uv) - 1/2 g(uv)R = - 8 pi GT(uv), is similar to ones used in unimodular relativity and cosmological constant equations (where the "uv"s in parentheses are subscripts).
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A framed item on the kitchen wall, around 0:14:00, shows a figure riding a bicycle and the name VALEIGH. This seems to be an allusion to the British Raleigh brand of bicycles.
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The dancer who gets eaten by his own shoes is a caricature of Fred Astaire.
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The film is almost entirely dialogue-free (though there are some spoken words, they are incidental.)
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The newspaper that the first triplet rustles for rhythm in their number at the cabaret is dated 6 May 1963 (around 0:57:52).
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On the wall of the Triplets' living room is a calendar showing October of 1926 -- almost four decades out of date at the time of the story.
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See also

Goofs | Crazy Credits | Quotes | Alternate Versions | Connections | Soundtracks

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