6.0/10
101
6 user 3 critic

Kong: The Animated Series 

When King Kong fell to his tragic death off the Empire State Building, there was a young scientist Dr. Lorna Jenkins who cloned him and took him back to Kong Island so he could finally be ... See full summary »
Reviews

On Disc

at Amazon

Episodes

Seasons


Years



1   Unknown  
2006   2005   2001   2000  

Photos

Edit

Cast

Series cast summary:
Kirby Morrow ...  Jason Jenkins / ... 40 episodes, 2000-2006
Saffron Henderson ...  Lua 40 episodes, 2000-2006
Daphne Goldrick Daphne Goldrick ...  Dr. Lorna Jenkins 40 episodes, 2000-2006
David Kaye ...  Professor Ramon De La Porta 40 episodes, 2000-2006
Scott McNeil ...  Wu-Chan / ... 38 episodes, 2000-2006
Pauline Newstone ...  Harpy 36 episodes, 2000-2006
Edit

Storyline

When King Kong fell to his tragic death off the Empire State Building, there was a young scientist Dr. Lorna Jenkins who cloned him and took him back to Kong Island so he could finally be protected again from the world. Eighteen years later her grandson Jason and friend Tan bring their teacher to the island to show him the paradise and of course Kong. But their teacher Ramon De La Porta has other plans, he steals the island's Primal Stones which control the balance of the island and make sure the imprisoned god Chyros does not escape. So now to restore balance to the island Jason, Tan, a shaman girl named Lua and of course Kong must journey around the world to retrieve the stones and stop De La Porta once and for all. Written by The Unforgiving Salesmen

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis


Certificate:

TV-Y7
Edit

Details

Country:

USA

Language:

English

Release Date:

9 September 2000 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

Kong: A Série Animada See more »

Company Credits

Production Co:

BKN,Ellipse Animation,M6 See more »
Show more on IMDbPro »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

(13 episodes)

Sound Mix:

Stereo

Color:

Color
See full technical specs »
Edit

Did You Know?

Connections

Follows Kong (2000) See more »

Frequently Asked Questions

This FAQ is empty. Add the first question.

User Reviews

 
Fit for a kid, not for a king
10 April 2017 | by xamtaroSee all my reviews

KONG THE ANIMATED SERIES is what you get when you take an iconic giant movie Monster and turn him into a Saturday morning cartoon to cater to the pokemon generation. Created in 2000 as a competitor to the then successful GODZILLA THE ANIMATED SERIES, KONG purportedly takes place Long after a loose retelling of the original movie. Unlike its reptilian kaiju counterpart which still maintains a plausible continuity within the world of the movie, KONG goes right off the wacky end with kooky technology, ancient artifacts, demons, cloning, and more feeling less like a King Kong show and more like a mash up of DIGIMON and 90s era Saturday morning cartoons.

In this series, King Kong dies but a scientist Dr Lorna Jenkins clones Kong using DNA of King Kong and her grandson Jason. Many years later, Jason gets invited to his grandmother's secret lab on "Kong island" (because "Skull Island" may be too frightening for little kids) along with his Friend Eric Tannenbaum and university professor Ramone De La Porta. Dr Jenkins has apparently been researching magical primal stones and created the cyberlink technology which allows users to merge with creatures turning giving them a power boost and turning them into humanoid giant Mutants. Lo and behold De La Porta turns out to be a bad guy and his cronies steal the primal stones and some cyberlink headsets. This causes some demon to slowly awaken. The race is now on to retrieve the stones from De La Porta before the demon Chrios awakens.

The digimon influence is readily apparent in the character of Kong himself. He is an animal Friend/Guardian who can power up to a stronger form in times of need. He and Jason share a loyal sibling type relationship with a few charming moments. With the , You have a scantily clad shaman girl Lua that serves as romantic foil to the protagonist, the comic relief sidekick Tennenbaum, the mentor type in dr Jenkins, all of these staples of old Saturday morning cartoons. Yes they are just as bland as those old cartoons but special thanks goes to the voice actors who lend much needed energy to otherwise insipid scripts.

Fans of anime would be able to recognise voice acting veterans like Kirby Morrow, Saffron Henderson and many others infusing their characters with distinct personalities while sharing good chemistry with each other. David Kaye and Scott McNeil are the stand out performances here with Kaye portraying De La Porta as a smooth cunning criminal with a fancy foreign accent (which tends to slip now and then between Spanish and French accent) and McNeil doing a range of voices from the comedic Tennenbaum, to one of De La Porta's African henchmen, to Kong himself.

The futuristic tech and unexplained magic, also staples of such cartoons, are effective hand waves for the inconsistent sizes of the giant monsters; one moment Kong can fit in a warehouse and the next he's towering over the same warehouse. Or we could just chalk that up to lousy animation courtesy of the Philippine Animation Studio inc. The studio's claim to fame were the horrible last season of the 90s X-men cartoon and some of the worst animated episodes of Animaniacs. In this series, the animation is serviceable. There are moments of Super smooth movements that stand out among the sometimes choppy and other times overdone character motions. For some reason, characters tend to gesture a lot when they talk in this cartoon and sometimes it turns out corny like something out of a stage play. As mentioned, such gesturing alternates between awkward and excessively expressive. The gaudy neon bright Colours and simplistic art work really do not help matters, which is a real shame especially when it comes to the giant Monster fights.

While the plots for the episodes are varied enough not to fall into a set formula, the overall story does meander a lot often losing track of the core story of retrieving the primal stones to stop the demon from awakening. The scripts are simplistic and borderline juvenile at times, betraying the magnificent performances of the voice cast. It's mediocrity from both a technical and artistic standpoint, along with its cliché ridden premise, only does a disservice to the legacy of King Kong as a timeless character.


1 of 1 people found this review helpful.  Was this review helpful to you? | Report this
Review this title | See all 6 user reviews »

Contribute to This Page



Recently Viewed