8.2/10
133
6 user 1 critic
In 1940s Harlem, two sisters take in a hepcat as a boarder. Although he is young and they are older, their life choices parallel one another.

Director:

Debbie Allen

Writer:

Shauneille Perry (teleplay)
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4 nominations. See more awards »

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Cast

Credited cast:
Phylicia Rashad ... Elizabeth
Debbie Allen ... Quilly (nee 'Queen Esther')
Bumper Robinson ... Husband
Eartha Robinson Eartha Robinson ... Lula Mae
Crystal R. Fox ... Lou Bessie (segment "Charmaine") (as Crystal Fox)
Paul Mooney ... Man At Counter
Randy J. Goodwin ... Bucket
Ella Joyce ... Waitress
Steven Smith Steven Smith ... Herman
Michael Ralph ... Speaker
Bebe Drake ... Geneva
Steven Smith Steven Smith
Rest of cast listed alphabetically:
Kelli Dawn Hancock ... Dancer
Kimo Keoke ... Swing Dancer
DeVonda Manghane DeVonda Manghane ... Dancer
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Storyline

In 1940s Harlem, two sisters take in a hepcat as a boarder. Although he is young and they are older, their life choices parallel one another.

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Genres:

Comedy | Drama | Romance

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Details

Official Sites:

PBS [United States]

Country:

USA

Language:

English

Release Date:

25 April 2001 (USA) See more »

Company Credits

Show more on IMDbPro »

Technical Specs

Color:

Color
See full technical specs »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

Phylicia Rashad and Debbie Allen who play sisters in the movie, are sisters in real life. See more »

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User Reviews

Loved it.
12 May 2001 | by Mag-13See all my reviews

I saw this film of a story written by Willa Cather twice on the local black public television network, out of Howard University. I wish I'd stayed to watch the credits, but I do know the names of two of the actors: Phylicia Rashad and Debbie Allen play sisters who, with several of their neighbors, move to Harlem from South Carolina to change their lives. Some of them change their names, but none of them changes his personality.

Forty-something and terminally spinstered Rashad rents out a room in her Harlem home to a young man, named "Husband," from back home. They soon fall in love and he convinces her and the viewer that he is not like the other emigrants who have fallen into a life of drugs, theft and prostitution.

Rashad and Allen show us black people as whites rarely see them in films: thoughtful, conservative, human.

I don't know if you could rent this film, but it's worth seeing. And I don't know why IMDB doesn't have more information on it.

Mag


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