Adapted from James Joyce's Ulysses, Bloom is the enthralling story of June 16th, 1904 and a gateway into the consiousness of its three main characters: Stephen Dedalus, Molly Bloom and the extraordinary Leopold Bloom.

Director:

Sean Walsh

Writer:

James Joyce (novel)
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1 win & 5 nominations. See more awards »

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
Stephen Rea ... Leopold Bloom
Angeline Ball ... Molly Bloom
Hugh O'Conor ... Stephen Dedalus
Neilí Conroy ... Driscoll
Eoin McCarthy ... Blazes Boylan
Alvaro Lucchesi Alvaro Lucchesi ... Buck Mulligan
Maria Hayden Maria Hayden ... May Dedalus
Aideen McDonald Aideen McDonald ... Veiled girl
Pat McGrath Pat McGrath ... Butcher
Mark Huberman ... Haines
Kenneth McDonnell Kenneth McDonnell ... Armstrong
Hugh MacDonagh Hugh MacDonagh ... Schoolboy
Andrew McGibney Andrew McGibney ... Colm / Newsboy
Dan Colley Dan Colley ... Bannon
Des Braiden ... Deasy
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Storyline

Fathers and sons and lovers. June, 1904. Leopold Bloom, Dublin Jew and cuckold, attends a funeral, recalls his infant son dead 11 years, faces an anti-Semite at a pub, has a phantasmagoric dream while at a brothel, feeds a drunken young poet Stephen Dedalus, bonds briefly with Stephen as if father and son, and gets into bed next to his wife Molly. Stephen spends his day teaching, talking about literature with pals, pondering Shakespeare and "Hamlet" and fatherhood, brooding on his dead mother, drinking too much, and accepting Bloom's hand. Molly, lusty Molly, recalls vividly her courtship and affirmation of Bloom. Homer's "Odyssey" provides the story's structure. Written by <jhailey@hotmail.com>

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Taglines:

The enthralling story of June 16th, 1904. See more »

Genres:

Drama | Romance

Motion Picture Rating (MPAA)

Rated R for sexual content including dialogue | See all certifications »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

Director Sean Walsh's name appears as the owner of one of the horses in the paper in one scene. See more »

Quotes

Molly Bloom: I said yes, I will, Yes.
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Crazy Credits

The film is dedicated to S... See more »

Connections

Version of Ulysses (1967) See more »

User Reviews

A picture post card version of _Ulysses_.
27 August 2004 | by stonejSee all my reviews

If they made1001 movie versions of _Ulysses_, none would be as beautifully and compellingly cinematic as the book itself. This is only the second version, as far as I know. But I enjoyed watching it. I suspect it was an effort to expose the book to the Good People of Ireland (Flann O' Brien) in preparation for the big centennial Bloomsday party--so they would know what they were celebrating, and so that the hapless tourists who wondered into Dublin on that day to experience the famous Irish hospitality, etc., might know what these people were celebrating as well. He used to be on the ten-pound note, Joyce, before the Irish switched to Euros.

I don't know if this movie would make any sense at all to people who haven't read the book itself. I have read the book itself, more than once, and some parts of it more even than that.

This version appears to have been written by Gerty MacDowell, after she grew up and got a job at the Dublin Chamber of Commerce, in 2003 (it takes some of us longer to grow up than others--and it seems to have taken her 99 years). I am looking forward to the next 999 versions. Joyce is reported to have said that he meant to keep academics busy for the next 300 years. God only knows how many years he wanted to keep film makers busy (it is a fact that he once tried to open a movie theater in Dublin Himself).

Stephen Rheas' Bloom is nicely Chaplinesque, as is just about everything else in the movie, including the music. All told, _Bloom_ is a nice exercise in nostalgia for a Joyce and a turn-of-the-twentieth-century Ireland that never existed--nostalgia is like that. Nice is nice, but this movie, it goes without saying, is nowhere near as great as _Ulysses_ is a book. Most of the characters and dialogue, as best as I can remember, comes from the book itself--but you can't capture much of that in two hours. But, then, there is ... Love's Old Sweet song.


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Details

Official Sites:

Official Site

Country:

Ireland

Language:

English

Release Date:

16 April 2004 (Ireland) See more »

Also Known As:

Bloom See more »

Filming Locations:

Dublin, Ireland See more »

Company Credits

Production Co:

Odyssey Pictures See more »
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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Dolby Digital

Color:

Color
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