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Gosford Park (2001)

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The lives of upstairs guests and downstairs servants at a party in 1932 in a country house in England as they investigate a murder involving one of them.

Director:

Robert Altman

Writers:

Julian Fellowes, Robert Altman (based upon an idea by) | 1 more credit »
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Popularity
1,664 ( 1,018)
Won 1 Oscar. Another 34 wins & 73 nominations. See more awards »

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
Maggie Smith ... Constance Trentham
Michael Gambon ... William McCordle
Kristin Scott Thomas ... Sylvia McCordle
Camilla Rutherford ... Isobel McCordle
Charles Dance ... Raymond Stockbridge
Geraldine Somerville ... Louisa Stockbridge
Tom Hollander ... Anthony Meredith
Natasha Wightman ... Lavinia Meredith
Jeremy Northam ... Ivor Novello
Bob Balaban ... Morris Weissman
James Wilby ... Freddie Nesbitt
Claudie Blakley ... Mabel Nesbitt
Laurence Fox ... Rupert Standish
Trent Ford ... Jeremy Blond
Ryan Phillippe ... Henry Denton
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Storyline

Set in the 1930s, the story takes place in an old-fashioned English country house where a weekend shooting party is underway. The story centers on the McCordle family, particularly the man of the house, William McCordle. Getting on in years, William has become benefactor to many of his relatives and friends. As the weekend goes on, secrets are revealed, and it seems everyone, above stairs and below, wants a piece of William and his money, but how far will they go to get it? Written by Ashley <AMTOT@aol.com>

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Taglines:

Tea At Four. Dinner At Eight. Murder At Midnight.

Genres:

Comedy | Drama | Mystery

Motion Picture Rating (MPAA)

Rated R for some language and brief sexuality | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

View content advisory »
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Details

Country:

UK | USA | Italy

Language:

English

Release Date:

18 January 2002 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

Gosford Park See more »

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Box Office

Budget:

$19,800,000 (estimated)

Opening Weekend USA:

$395,162, 30 December 2001, Limited Release

Gross USA:

$41,308,615, 6 June 2002

Cumulative Worldwide Gross:

$87,754,044, 6 June 2002
See more on IMDbPro »

Company Credits

Show more on IMDbPro »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

DTS (Digital DTS Sound)| Dolby Digital | SDDS

Color:

Color (Technicolor)

Aspect Ratio:

2.35 : 1
See full technical specs »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

Sir Alan Bates and Sir Derek Jacobi share two roles with each other: Hamlet, and his uncle, Claudius. See more »

Goofs

The movie takes place in 1932 but some of the songs Ivor Novello sings for the guests didn't come out until years after, like "Glamorous Night" (1935), "Why It Wasn't You" (1937), "I Can Give You a Starlight" (1939) and "Waltz of My Heart" (1939). See more »

Quotes

[Many years ago, Sylvia and Louisa cut cards to decide which of them would marry Sir William. Louisa lost]
Constance: Anyone care for a game of bridge after dinner? Louisa, how about you?
Louisa Stockbridge: Oh, I don't think so. I've rather gone off cards. I've never been very lucky with them.
Sir William McCordle: Me too.
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Crazy Credits

The cast credits at the end are separated between upstairs and downstairs. See more »

Connections

Featured in What Is Cinema? (2013) See more »

Soundtracks

The Land of Might-Have-Been
(1924)
Sung by Jeremy Northam
Music by Ivor Novello
Lyrics by Edward Moore
© Ascherberg Hopwood & Crew Limited
By kind permission of Warner/Chappell Music Ltd.
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Frequently Asked Questions

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User Reviews

Altman Back in Top Form
25 October 2002 | by bsilveySee all my reviews

It thrills me to say that after a string of stinkers ("Dr. T and the Women," "The Gingerbread Man") and so-so light films ("Cookie's Fortune"), Robert Altman has an unequivocally excellent film on his hands with "Gosford Park." It's a film that works on many layers and needs to be seen more than once for one to fully appreciate its resonance.

The film admittedly stinks as a murder mystery---it's almost funny how little Altman himself seems interested in the who-dunnit. But, typically for Altman, it's the deconstruction of the genre that he's interested in, not the genre itself. This movie isn't about a murder in a country house; it's a movie about class differences and people connecting (or not connecting) with one another.

It seems futile to mention stand out performances in a film filled to the rafters with stand-out performances, but I did especially like Emily Watson as a cheeky maid, Helen Mirren as the "perfect servant," and Kelly MacDonald as the novice lady's attendant who grows more than anyone else over the course of the film.

The film is at its best when it's probing the emotional depths of the story---it comes across as a bit too glib when the satire gets especially acidic (mostly with the Kristin Scott Thomas character), but like the best of his movies ("Nashville," "M*A*S*H," "Short Cuts") Altman knows how to control his own cynicism and doesn't let sarcasm rule.

With his on again-off again track record, we can expect the next Altman film to tank, so let's enjoy this one while we can.


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