7.4/10
4,627
61 user 73 critic

Time Out (2001)

L'emploi du temps (original title)
PG-13 | | Drama | 14 November 2001 (France)
Trailer
2:03 | Trailer
An unemployed man finds his life sinking more and more into trouble as he hides his situation from his family and friends.

Director:

Laurent Cantet

Writers:

Robin Campillo (scenario), Laurent Cantet (scenario)
2 wins & 8 nominations. See more awards »

Videos

Photos

Edit

Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
Aurélien Recoing ... Vincent
Karin Viard ... Muriel
Serge Livrozet Serge Livrozet ... Jean-Michel
Jean-Pierre Mangeot Jean-Pierre Mangeot ... Father
Monique Mangeot Monique Mangeot ... Mother
Nicolas Kalsch Nicolas Kalsch ... Julien
Marie Cantet Marie Cantet ... Alice
Félix Cantet Félix Cantet ... Félix
Olivier Lejoubioux Olivier Lejoubioux ... Stan
Maxime Sassier Maxime Sassier ... Nono
Elisabeth Joinet Elisabeth Joinet ... Jeanne
Nigel Palmer Nigel Palmer ... Jaffrey
Christophe Charles Christophe Charles ... Fred
Didier Perez Didier Perez ... Philippe
Philippe Jouannet Philippe Jouannet ... Human resources director
Edit

Storyline

Recently fired from his job, but unable to confess the truth to his close-knit family, Vincent spends his days driving around the countryside, talking into his cell phone and staring into space. Vincent fabricates a new job for himself so his family and friends will not know that he is out of work. At one point, he even sneaks into an office building. As Vincent roams the building's sterile halls, peeking into meeting rooms where men are busy at work, we see a man who yearns not just for a new job, but also for a place in the world. While this pantomime of work initially registers as sad and even a little pathetic, it slowly and unnervingly becomes terrifying. Written by Sujit R. Varma

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Taglines:

Now he must decide between his life of lies...or the truth.

Genres:

Drama

Motion Picture Rating (MPAA)

Rated PG-13 for sensuality | See all certifications »
Edit

Did You Know?

Trivia

Inspired by a true story, that of Jean-Claude Romand. In reality, Romand went on to kill, on January 9, 1993, his wife, two children and both his parents. See more »

Quotes

Vincent: You're crazy, Felix! Why lower your prices?
Félix: I don't know.
Vincent: You sold the other one for 30.
Félix: I liked the other one. I don't care about this one.
Vincent: But he doesn't know that.
Félix: I do what I want.
See more »

Connections

Version of The Adversary (2002) See more »

Soundtracks

Cool Bird
Composed by Marc Durst
Published by Kosinus Records / Kapagama
(p) 2000 Kosinus
© 2000 Kosinus Records / Kapagama
See more »

User Reviews

The Price of Success
14 April 2002 | by Zen BonesSee all my reviews

Ironically, I just saw this a day after viewing Abbas Kiarostami's brilliant "Close Up", a story of a man who could no longer accept the endless banalities of his life and decided to become someone else (a film director!). That man had no sense of identity about himself but he knew what he cared about and what he believed in (the power of art and cinema). That brings him one up on the hero of this story. Vincent is a man who also cannot accept the banalities of his life, but he hasn't the foggiest idea of who he is or what he really cares about. It's as if he was born out of a computer software program. He knows what he's supposed to care about: nice home, nice car, nice bank account... But his work as an investor is so deprived of any human value that he loses all sense of values. His environment; a sterile, generic, upper middle-class vacuum that could make one believe that all of France has turned into Silicon Valley with a touch of the Scandinavian, has none of the passion or warmth that one identifies with being human. He has a loving wife, but according to his 'program', he believes that he would lose her if she knew that he was no longer able to function as a cog in the machine, and provide her with the lifestyle that she has grown accustomed to.

That is the first tragedy of Vincent, because his wife really does love him. The second tragedy of Vincent, is that even though he recognizes his need for freedom, he doesn't know how to use it. He's like a man who has been released from a lifetime of imprisonment, but still hangs around the prison yard because he is unable to comprehend what might be available to him. He'd lost his job because his love for being free was more important to him than keeping his appointments, but most of his time spent in his new-found freedom is in doing the same job he'd done before: investments. The only difference now is that he likes to believe that the investments are helping developing Third World countries. He knows that there really are no investments (he keeps the money that people give him and spends it on a nifty Range Rover, among other things), but momentarily, he can feel as if he is 'somebody' to his family and friends when he tells them of this meaningful new job he (allegedly) has.

Vincent has been described by many as 'everyman', but I think of him more as 'everyman who has just stepped through the looking glass'. Instead of taking a good, hard look at himself, he somehow ended up taking a look beyond himself because he could not find a reflection. He can't even recognize how much he's patterned his children to follow the same program he did. We see him teaching his kindergarten-age son how to 'hard sell' his toys at a school fair. Later, in a fascinating scene, we see him and his family doing what most people of his class do in their free time. They go shopping in an upscale, overpriced store to buy clothing that they know they don't really need. Vincent has it all, but it fills nothing in him. His family has it all, yet they don't seem to question the fact that they rarely spend any time together.

Laurent Candet has created a beautifully somber and sober look at the price of 'success'. The film is practically drained of all color, save for blues and grays, to illustrate the life force that has been systematically drained from Vincent throughout his life. And the score, a somber cello piece, refreshingly accentuates Vincent's mind instead of his actions (like most scores do). It is like a slow-moving merry-go-round that brings on a sense of familiarity that is simultaneously comfortable and unnerving. Because what the gist of it all is: is that no one wants to spend their life on a merry-go-round. Even a comfortable one.


32 of 39 people found this review helpful.  Was this review helpful to you? | Report this
Review this title | See all 61 user reviews »

Frequently Asked Questions

This FAQ is empty. Add the first question.
Edit

Details

Country:

France

Language:

French

Release Date:

14 November 2001 (France) See more »

Also Known As:

Time Out See more »

Filming Locations:

France

Edit

Box Office

Gross USA:

$448,542

Cumulative Worldwide Gross:

$1,213,913
See more on IMDbPro »

Company Credits

Show more on IMDbPro »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Dolby Digital

Color:

Color

Aspect Ratio:

1.85 : 1
See full technical specs »

Contribute to This Page

Everything That's New on Netflix in December

No need to waste time endlessly browsing—here's the entire lineup of new movies and TV shows streaming on Netflix this month.

See the full list



Recently Viewed