7.4/10
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3 user 1 critic

The Spectre of Hope (2002)

The SpectrE of Hope is based on the latest work of photographer Sebastiao Salgado. Salgado spent 6 years traveling to over 40 countries, taking pictures of globalization and its ... See full summary »

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The SpectrE of Hope is based on the latest work of photographer Sebastiao Salgado. Salgado spent 6 years traveling to over 40 countries, taking pictures of globalization and its consequences - most notably, the mass migrations of populations around the world. In the film, Salgado presents his remarkable photographs in conversation with John Berger. Written by Anonymous

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Not Rated
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29 January 2002 (Netherlands)  »

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The Incredible Life of Sebastião Salgado.
1 February 2011 | by See all my reviews

WOW....what an incredible life Brazilian economist turned photographer Sebastião Salgado has led...what awesome- in the true sense of the word- images he has captured...and what an incredible story this documentary tells. The opening sequence of this film tweaks my intrigue for one reason.... he looks a lot like the elusive Chris Marker! The film is written by British painter turned writer John Berger. It began when he met Salgado in a cabin in the French Alps to discuss his book called "Migrations". Salgado begins by discussing how he watched tens of thousands of people die before his eyes- without being able to do anything but capture their pain and suffering in an image. Berger goes on to tell us of Salgado's subsequent journey across 43 countries over 6 years! The one consistency he observed was that everywhere he went there were people on the move, trying to maintain a living and feed their families. His goal became to the capture the essence of these people's lives with photography- the bastard "face of globalization". His photography is both eerie and chilling, yet stunningly beautiful.

The film is basically organized in two parts: the discussion between Salgado and Berger which acts like a Director's commentary would for a film- and numerous montages of Salgado's photography in which close ups and pans are used as a means to analyze the image- helping us as viewers to absorb each and every detail.

They quote the statistic that 1 in 5 people benefit from globalization, while 4 of 5 end up suffering. Salgado's photography reveals the reality of the situation for those 4 out of 5- forcing us to confront it. This film details and discusses Salgado's photography and experiences in places such as Rwanda, Sudan, former-Yugoslavia, Mexico, Afghanistan, Iraqi Kurdistan and Mozambique. The images speak for themselves.

As Berger states- Salgado's photography and this film leaves us with the question..."Who needs who the most? They us? Or us them? 10 out of 10. Without Question.


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