In 1976, Tony Wilson sets up Factory Records and brings Manchester's music to the world.

Writer:

Frank Cottrell Boyce (screenplay by)
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Popularity
4,989 ( 393)
1 win & 13 nominations. See more awards »

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
Steve Coogan ... Tony Wilson
John Thomson ... Charles
Paul Popplewell ... Paul Ryder
Lennie James ... Alan Erasmus
Shirley Henderson ... Lindsay
Mark Windows Mark Windows ... Johnny Rotten
Paddy Considine ... Rob Gretton
Raymond Waring ... Vini
Ron Cook ... Derek Ryder
John Simm ... Bernard Sumner
Danny Cunningham Danny Cunningham ... Shaun Ryder
Dave Gorman ... John the Postman
Ralf Little ... Hooky (Peter Hook)
Andy Serkis ... Martin Hannett
Nigel Pivaro Nigel Pivaro ... Actor at Granada
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Storyline

Manchester 1976: Cambridge educated Tony Wilson, Granada TV presenter, is at a Sex Pistols gig. Totally inspired by this pivotal moment in music history, he and his friends set up a record label, Factory Records, signing first Joy Division (who go on to become New Order) then James and the Happy Mondays, who all become seminal artists of their time. What ensues is a tale of music, sex, drugs, larger-than-life characters, and the birth of one of the most famous dance clubs in the world, The Hacienda - a mecca for clubbers as famous as the likes of Studio 54. Graphically depicting the music and dance heritage of Manchester from the late 70's to the early 90's, this comedy documents the vibrancy that made Mad-chester the place in the world that you would most like to be. Written by IGB

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Taglines:

The unbelievably true story of one man, one movement, the music and madness that was Manchester.


Motion Picture Rating (MPAA)

Rated R for strong language, drug use and sexuality | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

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Did You Know?

Trivia

Over 200 hours of footage were shot. See more »

Goofs

In the opening hang-gliding sequence, the design on the glider changes between close-ups and long shots (the long shots are of Tony Wilson himself during the actual event that is being portrayed). See more »

Quotes

[first lines]
Tony Wilson: Is it a bird? Is it a plane? No, it's the latest craze sweeping the Pennines, and I've got to be honest, I'd rather be sweeping the Pennines right now.
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Connections

Featured in 24 Hour Party People: Manchester the Movie (2003) See more »

Soundtracks

Love Will Tear Us Apart
Written by Ian Curtis, Peter Hook, Stephen Morris and Bernard Sumner
Published by Zomba Music Publishers Ltd
Performed by Joy Division
Licensed courtesy of Factory Communications Ltd
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User Reviews

Stumbles
28 June 2007 | by tedgSee all my reviews

There's more to this than meets the eye.

You may like it simply for the music. Superficially, it is a one of those things unsuitably called a "docudrama," a category that I don't quite understand.

But here's the way it is constructed. We have a fellow whose job is to show viewers around odd and interesting things. He's a character who takes on a metarole in the film as our guide, sometimes within the movie and sometimes stepping out of it and speaking directly to us, using several modes.

And the subject of this carefully folded structure? Anarchism. Music as anarchy, as specifically breaking the musical equivalent of narrative. I'm not sure that anyone can honestly like this music without making the commitment themselves. Otherwise, its a sort of perverse voyeurism, but I guess that's what drives the music business.

Winterbottom isn't a halfway kinda guy though, and you should be inclined to share anything he serves up. Here, he is back in the German new wave mode, where there is no story at all. No arc, no climax. Each event just sort of falls into the next. The camera (which takes the role of the watcher within, Tony, and the watcher without) similarly falls. To underscore this, Winterbottom has Ian Curtis hang himself in front of a TeeVee. On that is playing Herzog's Stroszek, dancing chicken and the amuck truck. Its Herzog's film with the same attitude: no narrative, a loss of narrative is the narrative or where the hole is.

After that death, incidentally, is one of the most haunting images I've seen. I do not think it is taken from another film. Children in Klan suits, some black, parade in a highly stylized 2d shot, then one carries a huge, erect Klan hat on a false color beach and tumbles.

You might consider this the male lover of "9 Songs." I do.

Ted's Evaluation -- 3 of 3: Worth watching.


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Frequently Asked Questions

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Details

Country:

UK

Language:

English

Release Date:

20 September 2002 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

24 Hour Party People See more »

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Box Office

Opening Weekend USA:

$34,940, 11 August 2002

Gross USA:

$1,184,096

Cumulative Worldwide Gross:

$2,801,397
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Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Dolby Digital

Aspect Ratio:

1.85 : 1
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