7.4/10
29,465
129 user 102 critic

24 Hour Party People (2002)

In 1976, Tony Wilson sets up Factory Records and brings Manchester's music to the world.

Writer:

Frank Cottrell Boyce (screenplay)

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From $2.99 (SD) on Prime Video

ON DISC
1 win & 13 nominations. See more awards »

Photos

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
Steve Coogan ... Tony Wilson
John Thomson ... Charles
Paul Popplewell ... Paul Ryder
Lennie James ... Alan Erasmus
Shirley Henderson ... Lindsay
Mark Windows Mark Windows ... Johnny Rotten
Paddy Considine ... Rob Gretton
Raymond Waring ... Vini
Ron Cook ... Derek Ryder
John Simm ... Bernard Sumner
Danny Cunningham Danny Cunningham ... Shaun Ryder
Dave Gorman ... John the Postman
Ralf Little ... Hooky (Peter Hook)
Andy Serkis ... Martin Hannett
Nigel Pivaro Nigel Pivaro ... Actor at Granada
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Storyline

Manchester 1976: Cambridge educated Tony Wilson, Granada TV presenter, is at a Sex Pistols gig. Totally inspired by this pivotal moment in music history, he and his friends set up a record label, Factory Records, signing first Joy Division (who go on to become New Order) then James and the Happy Mondays, who all become seminal artists of their time. What ensues is a tale of music, sex, drugs, larger-than-life characters, and the birth of one of the most famous dance clubs in the world, The Hacienda - a mecca for clubbers as famous as the likes of Studio 54. Graphically depicting the music and dance heritage of Manchester from the late 70's to the early 90's, this comedy documents the vibrancy that made Mad-chester the place in the world that you would most like to be. Written by IGB

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Taglines:

The unbelievably true story of one man, one movement, the music and madness that was Manchester.


Motion Picture Rating (MPAA)

Rated R for strong language, drug use and sexuality | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

View content advisory »
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Details

Country:

UK

Language:

English

Release Date:

20 September 2002 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

24 ores gemates rock See more »

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Box Office

Opening Weekend:

£265,428 (United Kingdom), 7 April 2002, Limited Release

Opening Weekend USA:

$34,940, 11 August 2002, Limited Release

Gross USA:

$1,130,379, 13 October 2002
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Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Dolby Digital

Aspect Ratio:

1.85 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

The movie was shot on video and then processed in post production to give it the look of film See more »

Goofs

Yamaha NS10 studio monitors/speakers are clearly seen when camera is panning around studio as Joy Division are recording. These monitors weren't available until 1987. See more »

Quotes

[first lines]
Tony Wilson: Is it a bird? Is it a plane? No, it's the latest craze sweeping the Pennines, and I've got to be honest, I'd rather be sweeping the Pennines right now.
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Connections

References High Fidelity (2000) See more »

Soundtracks

Belfast
Written by Paul Hartnoll (as P) & Phil Hartnoll (as P Hartnoll)
Published by Sony/ATV Music Publishing
Performed by Orbital
Licensed courtesy of Internal Records
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User Reviews

Terrific music bio with award-worthy acting by Steve Coogan
11 September 2002 | by Joe StemmeSee all my reviews

Ignore the awful ads for 24 HOUR PARTY PEOPLE (which are bollocks!), and run out and see the film while it is out in limited release. Anybody with an interest in Alternative Music in general, and the British Punk/New Wave & Rave scenes should see this examination of the past 25 years of British rock as filtered through the eyes of Factory Records' Tony Wilson.

Perhaps a bit too "inside" for general audiences, it is a rare example of a music based film that its actually good cinema to go along with it's raucous soundtrack. Well done, wry and entertaining. My only quibbles are that the filmmakers seem to be preaching to the converted. Except for the tragic Ian Curtis (JOY DIVISION), little attempt is made to inform the uninitiated as to why these bands mattered (NEW ORDER in particular, is just tossed around almost as a brand name, rather than a living breathing artistic unit). Also, we are constantly told how wonderful Manchester is as a city, but we are never really shown why. Steve Coogan's portrayal of Wilson really makes the film flow and live. It's not the kind of role that usually wins awards, but here's hoping some critics group somewhere notices. He's that fine.


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