When Russia's first nuclear submarine malfunctions on its maiden voyage, the crew must race to save the ship and prevent a nuclear disaster.

Director:

Kathryn Bigelow

Writers:

Louis Nowra (story), Christopher Kyle (screenplay)
1 win & 2 nominations. See more awards »

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
Sam Spruell ... Dmitri
Peter Stebbings ... Kuryshev
Christian Camargo ... Pavel
Roman Podhora Roman Podhora ... Lapinsh
Sam Redford ... Vasily
Steve Nicolson ... Demichev
Liam Neeson ... Capt. Mikhail Polenin
Ravil Isyanov ... Suslov
Tim Woodward ... Partonov
Lex Shrapnel ... Kornilov
Shaun Benson ... Leonid
Kris Holden-Ried ... Anton (as Kristen Holden-Ried)
Dmitry Chepovetsky ... Sergei
Christopher Redman ... Kiklidze
Tygh Runyan ... Maxim
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Storyline

The story of USSR's first nuclear ballistic submarine, which suffered a malfunction in its nuclear reactor on its maiden voyage in the North Atlantic in 1961. The submarine's crew, led by the unyielding Captain Alexi Vostrikov, races against time to prevent a Chernobyl-like nuclear disaster which threatens not only the lives of his crew, but has the potential to ignite a world war between the super powers. Written by Anonymous

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Taglines:

Fate has found its hero.

Genres:

Drama | History | Thriller | War

Motion Picture Rating (MPAA)

Rated PG-13 for disturbing images | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

View content advisory »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

K-19 suffered a fire in 1972 that killed 28 people. See more »

Goofs

When the ship's crew members meet at the end of the movie as older men, Polenin informs Vostrikov that the particular day of this meeting is important. That day marks 28 years since the reactor accident. K-19's reactor accident occurred on July 4th, 1961, but the scene appears to be set in the dead of winter. See more »

Quotes

[first lines]
Capt. Mikhail Polenin: All compartments: report readiness!
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Connections

Referenced in American Dad!: Widowmaker (2008) See more »

Soundtracks

Anything But Autumn
Written by Aleksejwitsch Karasjow
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User Reviews

 
One of the Most Moving War Films I've Ever Seen
30 July 2002 | by OreoloveSee all my reviews

Despite some bad reviews, being the war film fanatic that I am, I went to see this movie. I was expecting something much like U-571, (Men trapped in a disabled boat surrounded by the enemy), and this movie wasn't far from it. I must say that U-571 is my all-time favorite war picture, so I didn't expect The Widowmaker to surpass it. However, it came very close. The story was told well and the acting from most of the newcomers was superb. However, when I left the theater, I didn't want to watch it again for a long while. Not that it was a bad movie. It was just a little too graphic. I'm one who can watch people get blown to bits, decapitated, and crushed, however, since this story is true and the way these men suffered before they died a horrible death, was a little too much for me to watch. I know they couldn't have filmed it any other way. That is what makes this movie so good... the mere fact that I was uneasy while watching it. I found myself gasping... (I'm not one to gasp.)

The film is based on the story of a Russian sea captain (Harrison Ford) that is ordered to command a new nuclear powered submarine that has been thrown together in a very short amount of time. The objective is to test a missile near the north pole in hopes that the Russian government can catch up to the US who is threatening nuclear war. Although the crew is hesitant to board the ship, they fear the captain's wrath and work without complaint. Of course, the captain is 'do or die' and works the crew mercilessly, much to the dismay of the ship's original captain (Liam Neeson), who can do nothing but watch as his crew gets ready for mutiny. When the nuclear generator malfunctions, it is up to a few brave men to expose themselves to radiation and try and fix the power before disaster strikes and World War 3 begins. What I found most disturbing was the captain's refusal for American help until 7 men were dead and hundreds more were already exposed to dangerous levels of radiation. Watching these brave men slow-cook themselves for the rest of the crew was enough to make me cringe, (while other men dove into freezing water rather than go back into a radioactive submarine.)

All in all, this movie was a bit too much reality for me. However, it was wonderfully written, directed, and acted. I gave it ********/10.


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Details

Country:

UK | Germany | Canada | USA

Language:

English | Russian

Release Date:

19 July 2002 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

K*19: The Widowmaker See more »

Filming Locations:

Gimli, Manitoba, Canada See more »

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Box Office

Budget:

$100,000,000 (estimated)

Opening Weekend USA:

$12,778,459, 21 July 2002

Gross USA:

$35,168,966

Cumulative Worldwide Gross:

$65,716,126
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Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

DTS | Dolby Digital | SDDS

Color:

Color

Aspect Ratio:

2.39 : 1
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