6.0/10
2,283
30 user 17 critic

The Slaughter Rule (2002)

Trailer
1:02 | Trailer
A young man finds solace with a young woman, his mother, and a high-school football coach who recruits him to quarterback a six-man team.
2 wins & 2 nominations. See more awards »

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
Ryan Gosling ... Roy Chutney
David Morse ... Gideon Ferguson
Clea DuVall ... Skyla Sisco
David Cale ... Studebaker
Eddie Spears ... Tracy Two Dogs
Kelly Lynch ... Evangeline Chutney
Amy Adams ... Doreen
Ken White Ken White ... Russ Colfax
Noah Watts ... Waylon Walks Along
Kim DeLong Kim DeLong ... Lem Axelrod
Geraldine Keams ... Gretchen Two Dogs
Douglas Sebern ... Uncle Peyton
Cody Harvey Cody Harvey ... Coach Motlow
Melkon Andonian Melkon Andonian ... Devo
J.P. Gabriel J.P. Gabriel ... Jute
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Storyline

In Blue Springs, Montana, high school student Roy Chutney is beginning to lose his way in life largely the result of two simultaneous events. The first is that his father, Nelson Chutney, dies. Roy hadn't seen his father much since his parents divorced and his father remarried. Nelson was run over by a train, but Roy's mother, Evangeline Chutney, with who Roy has a somewhat emotionally distant relationship, believes he committed suicide. The second is that because funding to the school has reduced the football program to just a varsity team with no junior varsity, Roy, along with half the other players, is cut from the football squad, as his coach doesn't believe he is mentally tough enough despite he being a skilled player. The two incidents combined make the situation even worse for Roy as football was his primary connection to his father. Into Roy's life enters Gideon Ferguson, the local newspaper seller, who asks Roy to be part of his newly formed football team, which will play in... Written by Huggo

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Genres:

Drama | Sport

Motion Picture Rating (MPAA)

Rated R for language and sexual content | See all certifications »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

Some of the songs referenced by Gid and/or Floyd throughout the movie include
  • "Ragged But Right" by Riley Puckett 1934
  • "Nothing But Trouble" by Lonnie Johnson 1929
  • "Cash On The Barrelhead" by The Louvin Brothers 1954
  • "Rank Stranger" by Albert E. Brumley 1954
  • "Will Jesus Wash The Bloodstains From Your Hands?" by Hazel Dickens 1964
  • "Straighten Up And Fly Right" by The Nat King Cole Trio 1949
  • "Wayfaring Pilgrim" by Almeda Riddle 1932
Gid also references "Drifting Too Far From The Shore" and "Going Back To Jericho" during the ice fishing scene but he doesn't state an artist or year. There is a deleted scene in which Floyd references "I Ain't Drunk, I Am Just Drinkng" by Jimmy Liggins but Gid interrupts him before he can state the year. See more »

Goofs

The microphone that the yodeling band gather round is a Sennheiser MD441, which has a tight, end-on pickup pattern. Singing into it sideways as they are, the would hardly have been picked up. See more »

Quotes

Roy Chutney: My father told me if I was hard enough, I wouldn't break. He lied. Everything breaks.
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Connections

Featured in The 2003 IFP Independent Spirit Awards (2003) See more »

Soundtracks

West of Samoa
Written by Wesley W. West
Performed by Speedy West & Jimmy Bryant
Courtesy of Capitol Nashville
Under License from EMI/Capitol Music Special Markets
See more »

User Reviews

 
Underrated Effort
14 January 2003 | by B24See all my reviews

As a subscriber to Sundance Channel, I am intrigued by recurrent programming patterns in the films shown. Recently, for example, there has been a spate of male-oriented psycho-sexual dramas that go deeply into themes usually represented in mainstream cinema as subconscious or accidental phenomena.

In The Slaughter Rule as well as other recent offerings like L.I.E. or Priest or Taboo (originally Gohatto), characters reveal emotions that seem designed specifically to break new ground in the amorphic area between ordinary storytelling and what some would call pornography. The common word to describe this is "disturbing." But just as Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf, Midnight Cowboy, and Harold and Maude opened people's eyes in the 60's and 70's to the possibilities of "disturbing" cinema as literature, these new films may lead in my view to an entirely new public attitude about the inherent validity of the effort.

To be sure, The Slaughter Rule is a flawed film. So are many others of its kind to date. Its premise, however, is sound. One can nitpick about cinematic values, geographical anomalies, or plot distractions, etc., but to be able to see disparate fictional characters get under each other's skin is what makes any drama come to life. Added to that in this case is a very competent job of producing, directing, and editing. Moreover, no one can quarrel with the acting performance of David Morse.

Coming to grips with overtly sexual themes in films -- particularly those that deal seriously with "disturbing" but very real kinds of human emotions -- is a challenging task not only for moviemakers like the Smiths, but also for viewers. I give this movie an "E" for effort and a solid 9 out of 10 for everything else.


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Details

Country:

USA

Language:

English

Release Date:

14 September 2002 (Greece) See more »

Also Known As:

The Slaughter Rule See more »

Filming Locations:

Centerville, Montana, USA See more »

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Box Office

Budget:

$500,000 (estimated)

Opening Weekend USA:

$1,461, 12 January 2003

Gross USA:

$13,411

Cumulative Worldwide Gross:

$13,411
See more on IMDbPro »

Company Credits

Production Co:

Solaris See more »
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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Stereo

Color:

Color

Aspect Ratio:

2.35 : 1
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