Kill Bill: Vol. 1 (2003) Poster

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10/10
Cinema has rarely been this exciting!
gogoschka-128 October 2015
Having seen Tarantino's 3 previous films, going into the cinema, my expectations for 'Kill Bill' were already over the roof. However, regardless of my high hopes for quality entertainment, I was not prepared for this film. I was dumbfounded. I was blown away. I had quite simply never seen anything even remotely like it.

In 'Kill Bill', the revenge plot serves only as a larger story arc, thus allowing Tarantino to play with as many different genres as he likes, and boy - what a mix he dishes out! With complete disregard for the conventions of filmmaking, he paints an expressionistic masterpiece in his own unique style, the likes of which the world has never seen before. Cinema rarely gets this exciting. With 'Kill Bill', Tarantino proved once and for all that all the hype around his persona is justified: he IS the most daring, original - and entertaining! - filmmaker of his generation. Simply amazing: 10 stars out of 10.

Lesser-Known Masterpieces: http://www.imdb.com/list/ls070242495/

Favorite Low-Budget And B-Movies: http://www.imdb.com/list/ls054808375/

All-Time Favorite Films: http://www.IMDb.com/list/mkjOKvqlSBs/
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10/10
Gorgeous!
Emma1 March 2005
A lot of people have come up to me and said "How can you love Quentin that much, he is just too extreme!" or "Oh come on, Kill Bill is just SO not realistic.." Yes. No.

Mr. Quentin Tarantino is rather extreme, yes, and it's lovely! And No. Kill Bill is not realistic, but it's not meant to be realistic! Just like... Lord of the Rings, that's not realistic either! But because it has clear unreal elements, like wizards, it's acceptable?

You don't go to see Kill Bill, or any other Q.T-film to see "Stepmom", in the same way you don't go to a Marilyn Manson concert hoping that they will play some Spice Girls..

Kill Bill, both volume 1 and 2, is absolutely gorgeous! The art direction is beautiful! The camera angles are perfect... just Gorgeous! The lighting, the sound, the dialogs... and of course, the details! No one works with small details the way Quentin does. I must also say that the soundtrack is brilliant and the whole film is just so well casted! Uma Thurman is perfect in the leading role, Darryl Hannah has never been this good before, ever! And Chiaki Kuriyama, even though she has a quite small role, is excellent, even better than she is in "Battle Royale". David Carradine is painfully perfect, Michael Madsen is ALWAYS excellent, but never as good as when he works with Tarantino. I must also say that Sonny Chiba was great. I've never been a big fan of Vivica A Fox until now, and I used to think that Lucy Liu was just your average actor but she turned out to be fierce. Pretty much everyone who is in this film is ten times better than they've ever been.

But above all things, Kill Bill is artistic, beautiful... Perfect colors, perfect everything... gotta love it.
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9/10
Instant classic, but not for all audiences.
The_Angry_Critic6 March 2005
I know it's a couple years late, but I had to write a review for some of the few people that haven't seen one of my favorite and refreshing I've seen over the last few years. Kill Bill Vol. 1 is yet another quality film of Tarantino's short, but distinguished list.

Kill Bill involves a nameless woman (Uma Thurman) who is slowing seeking revenge on her former hit squad the Viper Squad and her boss Bill (David Caradine.) Her former hit squad wronged her by gunning down her closest friends and family during her wedding and putting her into a coma while being pregnant. A few years later she awakens in a hospital, without child, and tries to track down each member of the squad. As the story progresses (through this film and the sequel), you find out who she really, why Bill wanted her dead and the fate of her daughter.

The movie is really a combination of Tarantino's love for the 70's over-dramatized Kung-Fu movie era and story of revenge with rich dialog. Yes, this movie is violent, but in a cheesy way. This created some controversy and really had audiences stirred up, failing to realize it was supposed to be over the top without no sense of realism. Like I said, it was supposed to be a tribute more so than a gruesome action flick. With all cheesiness aside, I can understand how some people could feel a little woozy after seeing someone lose an arm and having 4 gallons of Kool-Aid red blood shoot out of the body like a whale's blow hole. What really makes this movie is Tarantino ability to make bad to mediocre actors seem like good ones, a smart and hilarious dialog and a good storyline. Of course, this is what he does in pretty much in all of his movies.

There are various plot holes in the story, but we are really meant to ignore them unlike most movies. Just like the gory scenes, come to grips to the fact that the most of the implausibilities are there just to fill in the gaps of the movie. The movie also features a couple of classic Tarantino showdowns, including an unforgettable one with the Japanese infamous crime lord, O-Ren Ishii (Lucy Lui.) Once again, Tarantino puts his imagination at work again in his story telling by using some of his old techniques like jumping timelines and some new ones like adding Japanese animation for character backgrounds.

I wouldn't really recommend this film to someone who is really not from the Pulp Fiction era. This film is really just homage to flicks that frequently appear on Sunday Samurai Showcase, revenge and Tarantino's continuous fascination with Uma Thurman. This film contains extreme violence and sometimes strange dialog coupled with some pretty good acting and directing. If you're not a fan of Tarantino's films, you should pass on this one because it is doesn't stray to far from his other stuff. If you like his other works, this is a must see due to its originality and quality. And, if you just don't like Tarantino himself, and find him annoying like everybody else, I don't blame you but it's still worth your while seeing.
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9/10
Tarantino's Blue Period is OVER!
Roberto Bentivegna10 October 2003
Just saw Kill Bill: Vol. 1 and was surprised, to be honest, at how incredibly GOOD this film is. Here is a craftsman (or artist, if you prefer) at the top of his game. Some of the shots are simply incredible; the score is, for the most part, vintage Tarantino selections- and the RZA does a very good job at filling the blanks; Uma Thurman is a great female lead, for sheer presence (and decent acting chops). Even Lucy Liu, who I expected was going to re-hash her Charlie's Angel character, burst on the scene like a flaming nunchuck.

The stringing together of the scenes was impeccable. The transitions, the intercutting between dialogue, the flashbacks... I simply could not get enough. Tarantino IS, indeed, having fun here. He is giving us a film that may not go down as a classic, Pulp Fiction style, but that shows us what is yet to come. I doubt that he's lost his writing talents (as some have claimed), and I actually disagree that the dialogue in the film is "poor", or that there are "no memorable lines" (Empire). The kung-fu genre has never been a particularly good park to display Shakespearean writing virtuosisms. The lines work fine. The plot is simple enough, but Tarantino takes a burger and serves it as "steak tartare with sauce au poivre and asparagus terrine". He basically manages to cram so much information into the film that plot is simply irrelevent. What is relevent is the Bride's thirst for blood, her primal sense of vengeance and our total devotion to her. Bill, of course, is one of the greatest characters to ever NOT appear on screen. Overall, a great movie and an example of how a filmmaker's tool is not his pen: it's his eye.
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10/10
This movie was brilliant!
Rooster9914 March 2005
Man, what a film. As a fan of 70's martial arts movies, it was great to see all of the references. I also thought the use of B&W throughout was extremely effective. The cartoon sequences seemed a bit much, but did fit in with the overall feel of the film. I have seen many people posting about the sheer amount of blood and guts, but you have to remember this was Tarantino's homage to Bruce Lee-era action pictures. In those movies, the stories were very similar epics of revenge, and they never had much of a budget for good "gore" effects. It was more or less "throw some fake blood on the guy who just got killed" type of effects, which were duplicated accurately by some of the deaths in this movie. The plot also followed closely the plot of most 70's Kung Fu movies; something despicable happens to the weak hero (whole village razed, family slaughtered, etc..) and the hero goes away for years to learn the secrets of a particular style of Kung Fu. All of these movies contained the "secret move" which the master normally does not teach, except of course, in this rare instance. That move, as depicted in Kill Bill Vol. 2, is always used on the evil leader of the clan whom had brought death and chaos to the hero.

Kill Bill was a terrific modern take on those movies which were always set in ancient China. I was very impressed with Uma Thurman's swordplay, at no point did I feel that it looked scripted or fake. Even when fighting against more than 50 Crazy 8's, it replicated admirably the incredibly one-sided fights from some of the best martial arts movies made 30 years ago.

All in all, a great and original film! R.
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10/10
one of the best films of all time
A_Different_Drummer28 August 2016
Arguably this should not be a difficult film to review. It is nothing less than brilliant. The story, the direction, the musical score, the casting, the acting, the dialog, the fight choreography, the inset homage to past films ... brilliant.

Just brilliant.

What makes this film tricky to review is not the film but ironically the film-maker.

I do not know the deep background here but I am guessing that QT, at the very height of his creative powers, locked himself in a cabin in the woods for a month and put this opus together. And essentially (in the view of this reviewer) not only created one of the best films of all time but essentially defined his own career by setting a bar so high that even his own future work could not equal it.

And there you have it. The hard part of the review.

The film is perfection. But in my view QT has yet to produce anything that comes close either in terms of final product or even in terms of effort expended.
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1/10
The problem with Tarantino
stefano14888 November 2003
Warning: Spoilers
*SPOILERS*

First of all, let me warn you. I've always detested Tarantino, so I didnt'go see this film free of prejudice.

That said, I can't think of a worse film I've seen lately, except "The Matrix Reloaded". The reason is that Tarantino shows too much violence, and that he doesn't show anything else. "But that's the point!" some will say. The point of what? Ok, lets' make a film and let's show a rape and say that that's the point. Does that mean that the film is good?

Tarantino has always been overrated (I disliked "Pulp Fiction" as well). The reason is that he manages to feel unconventional and artsy, so many will feel smart by saying that he's a genius, that his films are masterpieces and all that crap. The plain truth is that he's either a sadistic voyeur or a cunning man who's found a way to make pots of money by exploiting people's naivety. Or both.

Although I don't like gore or black humour, I sometimes appreciate it (eg some films with Vincent Price). The point is trivial, but worth making: black humour has to be, well, humorous. The problem with Tarantino is that he's nothing. A vacuum.

Some reviewers have said that if you don't understand what this film is about, you just won't get it; that it's a mockery and so on. The problem is that if one treats himself to shallow, uninspired, unoriginal, uninventive films, who are shot chiefly for the purpose of using some glitzy special effects and for solvin someone's money problems for the rest of his life, you may find such a film creative or inspired, instead of just the trick it is.

Tarantino is in quotations. He quotes all the time. But a film full of quotations and references is a trick that is worth doing once or twice. After that, it can't hide any more the outright lack of creativity that hides behind the references.

If you watch a gory b-movie (or any b-movie, for that matter), you may like it, even love it, but you'd never go so far as to claim it's a work of "art". Tarantino is "hip" (for the time being), so it's fashionable to call this lame director a genius.

But time will tell.

Remember David Lynch.
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10/10
Fantastic
mjw230523 January 2005
Probably Tarantino's most universal movie to date, with a little less character dependency than most of his films and a more linear approach than usual, Kill Bill Volume 1 is a great place to start for anyone new to his movies. I don't mean to imply this is a shallow film (far from it), i simply found it easier on the mind than Tarantino's other movies.

Uma Thurman, left for dead by her ex-boyfriend (Bill) doesn't die and begins her quest for vengeance, by hunting down Bill's gang members in a search for Bill. Armed with a Samurai sword and a deadly blend of martial arts skills, Uma delivers action, violence and passion as she plays out the character with beautiful precision.

Need i say, this is excellently directed, brilliantly scripted and cast, and should be in everyone's Tarantino collection.

10/10 Second only to Pulp Fiction. Although it has wider appeal (I think)
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An adrenaline-driven coaster-ride through gratingly bold and captivating martial-arts extravaganza.
janyeap9 October 2003
Sure it's outlandishly violent and bloody. Can anyone expect Tarantino's movie not to be a true mind-blowing, adrenaline-pumping shocker? Of course not! Gritty and slick, his first installment of KB rocks with moody western imagery, the '60s and '70s-era of Hong Kong martial arts-action, the influences of the ritualistic samurai swordsmanship, and Japanese anime. Like in all his films, Tarantino never fails to merge dark humor with terror. It's impossible not to smile over the Shaw Bros.' iconic introduction ploy and the De Palma-esque split screens. Observe the `Carrie' blank-starry eyed image settled on The Bride's gory face as she's introduced to the audience. Perhaps, Uma Thurman in her yellow suit is a salute to the yellow-suited Bruce Lee in his last film, The Game of Death. Or is The Bride 'Just another little Western girl playing at being a samurai' - as O-Ren Ishii blatantly puts it?

This film's a sampling of the Tarantino 'fury,' short of the Tarantino customary fiery tongue. It celebrates the Tarantino trademark of avoiding the use of computer-generated CGI special effects. It's almost as if I'm watching a colorful and bloodied kabuki stage that's displaying a stunningly massive tournament of multi-layered kung-fu and female samura sword-fighting styles to dazzle the audience. It's examining how Tarantino catalogues the great stylistic elements of his favorite 'old-school' filmmakers and transforms them into a phenomenally creative and mesmerizing film. Yep, there's a great deal of captivatingly artistic boldness in this film. Powerfully portrayed and not to be easily forgotten. Violently brutal and gloriously gory without doubt, and yet so aesthetically operatic and astoundingly artful. The music and lyrics that accompany the scenes are astounding. They set the moods so appropriately with the events.

Even at 'The House Of Blue Leaves', we get to see Tarantino weaving the artistic styles of Lucio Fulci, Chang-Che, Sergio Leone, Kurosawa, Zhang Yimou and Busby Berkeley to bring the audience a stylistic exhibit of remarkable montage grandeur. The themes of betrayal and revenge come off strong. Every camera shot and scene seems to scream out, non-stop, `Kill Bill and all of Bill's DVAS members.' My adrenaline's still flowing as I'm recalling the scenes. Tarantino has make a solid point with this film to show that martial arts scenes should stick to the artful and realistic choreographic treatment to sustain the true spiritual spirit of martial arts. A+
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An Instant Classic
Cocephus12 October 2003
Warning: Spoilers
`The fourth film by Quinton Tarantino', as the credits shamelessly explain, is yet another bankable classic from a director who's already changed the art with `Reservoir Dogs', `Pulp Fiction' and `Jackie Brown'.

From `Kill Bill's first surprising gunshot to its monumental cliffhanger ending (right up there with `Luke, I am your father'), the movie is relentlessly intense, tearing an audience between wanting more action and wanting a cigarette to calm frayed nerves. We follow the tale of `The Bride' (played to convincing, vengeful perfection by Uma Thurman) as she sets out to murder her former colleagues, members of the `Deadly Viper Assassination Squad', and their leader, the enigmatic, faceless Bill. After attempting to leave the group of assassins for a normal life, the Bride is tracked down on her wedding day and witnesses the murder of her wedding party, right before Bill puts her in a coma. Four years later, a very angry Bride wakes up.

Tarantino pulls no punches, creating, as one critic put it, `The most violent film ever released by an American film distributor'. Squirting blood and flying limbs abound, but the director does it all with a breathtaking sense of style. We witness one sword-dance in silhouette, one in black and white, one over a beautifully filmed snow-covered Japanese garden, and even a sequence in Anime. `KB's story is minimal, but Tarantino's aim is style: Sergio Leone, Cheh Chang and Bruce Lee are all paid homage, and then gracefully outdone.

The soundtrack, primarily Japanese artists performing American styles, is haunting: Tarantino breaks form by not using well-known American classic rock (who could forget being `Stuck in the Middle' of Mr. Blonde and a helpless cop?), but by doing so sets the perfect mood of the film. They're songs we've never heard before, but feel strangely connected to.

Yes, the movie is in two volumes. However, the end feels right, coming after an epic battle that puts `Reloaded's `Burly Brawl' to shame. `Kill Bill' is a testament to Tarantino's ability to take the craft of his idols and make it his own, mixing classic cult film style and mixing it with his own wicked sense of Cool. Not for the faint of heart or anyone looking for a `feel-good' film, but `Kill Bill' is at the very least an instant classic.
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9/10
Style rules substance
Wix_Moran24 November 2004
Warning: Spoilers
Do I think this movie is absolutely brilliant? Yes. Do I think this is the all time greatest movie ever, or even a top 50? Nope. I find the dichotomy between people who hate this movie and those that think it's the greatest film ever made is interesting. Even more interesting is the apparent split between fans of Volumes 1 and 2. Like the thread says, I think most of it's a matter of those who prefer style to substance. For my past, Volume 1 destroys Volume 2, but I concede that everyone has their own tastes and experiences and that no one pinion has any more weight than the other. Two scenes in particular really make this movie brilliant in my opinion, and both are fairly subtle in their portrayal but fascinating by their tone and the cinematic elements that come together to carry them off:

1.) The scene where Oren and the Crazy 88 enter the House of the Blue Leaves. Absolutely magical. The score, the pacing, the atmosphere....simply magnificent. The slow motion pull away and the obvious hierarchy of characters, Lucy Liu was absolutely made for that part and that part was made for that scene. The beautiful and menacing Gogo Yubari and the goofy 88s trailing behind. You can also feel the tension the owners feel at having such esteemed guests but one's who admittedly exude as much fear as they do respect. Add to this the nameless, faceless people dancing who are oblivious to the regality (and lethality) of Oren's entourage.

2.) Oren is called out by Kiddo who subsequently whacks off Sophie's arm in a highly symbolic gesture. Words can't describe how moving that scene is. The score is superb and the timing is nothing short of perfect. I especially love the way the crowd pauses after the arm slicing...like they're all stunned or still convincing themselves it rally happened...then all rush out screaming. Kiddo makes a slow, deliberate plod through the panicked crowd, a march to destiny filmed from several perspectives that combine holistically to give the segment a life of it's own.

One aspect of this movie that puzzles me is the emphasis it's critics make of the gore. For my part the gore was so outlandish it's hard for me to see how anyone could take it seriously, and that was part of the appeal. Buckets of blood spraying 15 feet in the air is so beyond the realm of reality how could you possibly take it seriously? For my part it was borderline comical and really brought out the flavor of the scenes, rather than being their focus. And regardless of what you think of Tarrentino as a director, the man is bar none the best at matching musical scores to a scene in the business. A few other noteworthy scenes...

*The end-fight between Oren and Kiddo....marvelous stuff. The backdrop of the snow and the water, the smooth silence interrupted by the fountain, again, a great accompanying score. Fine piece of film craftsmanship.

*Kiddo's overhead film shot while walking to the bathroom of the House of the Blue Leaves. Simply amazing. 5,6,7,8s performing live is just quirky yet proper enough to really add some depth and the unique filming make this a scene to behold.
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Kill Bill is one of the brashest, boldest and bloodiest movies I have ever seen, so look over your shoulder, because........... 'Here comes the bride, with only one thing on her mind, a roaring rampage of re
Old Joe7 January 2004
It has been six years since we have seen a movie from one of the world's most talked about directors, Quentin Tarantino, but the wait for me, has been worth the while. Tarantino can now add the martial arts masterpiece 'Kill Bill' to his resume, a film that left me speechless after I had seen it. It certainly is one intense, hateful movie, containing some of the greatest sword fighting sequences ever filmed in a movie. Tarantino has made KB with class, precision and close intense attention to every detail. But, what else should we expect from a movie freak, like Quentin Tarantino?

An entire wedding party is slaughtered during a dress rehearsal in a rural chapel: the pregnant woman in the blood-splattered wedding dress is Black Mamba, better known as 'The Bride'. The assassin, Bill, and his circle known as 'The Vipers' leave 'TB' for dead, however she was merely comatose. Four years later, 'TB' suddenly awakes from her coma, ferociously focused on one mission, to seek revenge on her former master. One by one, she will kill the various assassins. She is saving Bill for last.

I am not sure where I want to start with my review of Kill Bill. I love parts of it, but then find other parts to be extremely difficult to watch. Quentin Tarantino has written and directed another powerful piece of cinema, in a way that only he could. This time we see more violence, the action and the result of that violence, with it being a bit over-powering in the end. But without the violence, KB would have not been the movie it was.

This time Tarantino has not focussed on the dialogue in this movie, when it came to writing its script, more he wanted to show what the characters he had created, and why they were in the position they were in. For me I can appreciate both aspects of what Tarantino shows, as he can express himself either visually or with dialogue.

The other part I like about KB is the way Tarantino dedicated the movie to certain aspects of cinema history. To quote Quentin he said Kill Bill is 'my yakuza movie, my samurai movie, my spaghetti western movie', and it was quite clear for me how passionate Tarantino was in showing these parts. However it was also so much more, with one of the great sections of the movie being presented in Japanese animation. I also believe that there was a clear reference to black and white movies and silent movies, as KB had these sections a few times. I also feel that Tarantino is in some way trying to show his appreciation to Pulp Fiction, the movie that made him successful, via KB. If this is true, I do not feel it is gloating, rather I give Tarantino great praise, because some movie makers ignore the movies that give them success, but not here.

While 'KB' has some interesting characters, none are what I would call 'likeable'. 'The Bride', aka Black Mamba (Uma Thurman) is a girl totally driven by the desire to get revenge. Thurman really suits her part well, as she not only looks attractive, but is really believable as this American martial arts tough girl. Helping 'TB' on her quest is Samuri sword expert Hattori Hanzo (Sonny Chiba). This character brings a very oriental feel to the movie, something I liked. The bickering with his assistant was fun to see being played out.

'The Deadly Viper Assassination Squad' are the cruel callous people who inflict horrific harm on 'TB'. Bill (David Carradine) is their leader, a person we only hear and see in hand gestures, which is reminiscent of Marsellus Wallace in Pulp Fiction. Bill still has a very strong presence in the film, even though we never see him. Under Bill are killers like O-Ren Ishii, aka Cottonmouth (Lucy Liu), whose introduction, via the Japanese Animation, was great. Under Cottonmouth is her personal assistant, lawyer and translator, Sofie Fatale (Julie Dreyfus), who was present at the slaughtering of 'TB'. When 'TB' sees Sofie once again, she is pretty bitter about what Sofie let have happen to her. What we hear has happened to Sofie at the hands of 'TB', is truly unbelievable.

Another of Cottonmouth's women is a little girl, Go Go Yubari (Chiaki Kuriyama), who is more deadly than she looks. Her school girl sound and look is very interesting, while her confrontation with 'TB' highly entertaining. Then there is the evil nurse, Elle Driver, aka Californian Mountain Snake (Daryl Hannah), who shows very little emotion towards 'TB', other than hate. Vernita Green (Vivica A Fox) is another woman that 'TB' has on her hit list. Her demise was highly entertaining to say the least, again reminiscent of Pulp Fiction.

All the scenes with fighting in KB are a highlight for me, especially the sword fighting, as they are so fun and intense, with the last hour of the movie purely exhausting, with the final showdown between 'TB' and Cottonmouth & co. being terrific. The middle section of film was also great, as it tells the majority of the KB Vol. 1 story, although parts are pretty disturbing.

Kill Bill is another film by Quentin Tarantino, where I have to say it was 'exceptionally well made'. There is a scene in Volume 1, which reminded me of 'Matrix Reloaded'. Now I have heard that Tarantino hates the Matrix franchise, and you can see what he is making a stand against, film's laden with SFX. KB is 'not guilty' of being that. The violence is very graphic in KB, but at certain times the violence was 'laughable', as it seemed to look deliberately fake. But perhaps I am wrong? Volume 1 ended at a good point, setting up the conclusion, Volume 2 beautifully. So Kill Bill: Volume 2, get here, A.S.A.P.

CMRS gives 'Kill Bill: Volume 1': 4.5 (Very Good - Brilliant Film)
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1/10
No story to the movie
l8apex3228 October 2003
Warning: Spoilers
Spoiler Alert!!! I like Reservoir Dogs and Pulp Fiction. The story line was strong in RD and less so in PF. PF, though, had interesting sub-plots that loosely wove together to make a good movie.

I also see the genius in the dialog in RD and in the characters in Pulp Fiction. I was expecting to see something in this movie.

Unfortunately, Kill Bill was not interesting, nor genius and did not have a plot. Basically, the main character was screwed over in a previous time in her life and made a top 5 hit-list of people from which to extract revenge.

The way she extracts revenge is to engage in hand-to-hand or martial weapon on weapon combat. Of course, the protagonist wins the fights and the people are checked off the list.

I think Luci Liu (sp?) is the 3rd person on the list. The movie goes into a 20 minute section on how she gets a Okinawan curved sword. Now armed with the best weapon, she takes on Liu's whole team of trained martial artists - and whips them all single handedly. I'm talking 20, 30, 40 individuals who all attack her at the same time in the same room. She still wins.

Then, she battles the "board leader", and after sufficient scenery changes, she wins again.

Each of these battles is full of graphic violence and blood, as you'd expect from the director (I won't try to spell his name). But, you can only show an arm getting lopped off and the resulting gieser of blood so many times. Wait, my mistake, you can show it for 2 hours if you are the movie Kill Bill.

After the Liu's character is killed, #3 is checked off and the movie ends.

There is no plot. The special effects and battle scenes were state of the art, but do not make a movie.

I have no interest in "Part 2" because I have no interest in any of the characters or in more film about Uma killing people with swords. 2 hours was 1.5 hours too much.

Two thumbs down. Don't believe the (if any) hype.
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9/10
You can't have one without the other
calvinnme8 March 2017
Warning: Spoilers
I'm only subtracting one star because either part one or part two taken alone seems incomplete, yet satisfying nonetheless. If they could have been merged into one film it would be the perfect combination of mystery, mythology, and exposition.

Uma Thurman was nominated for a Golden Globe as "The Bride," a woman who seeks revenge against the group of assassins, of whom she was once a member, who turned her wedding rehearsal into a bloodbath, killing everybody else in the wedding chapel and putting her into a coma for four years and having her awaken to an empty womb - she looked about eight months pregnant when Bill shot her. In volume one, although all five of the people involved in the massacre are on The Bride's hit list, she only kills two of them.The Bride goes after Vivica Fox's now-married housewife and mother, and Lucy Liu's Yakuza boss, which requires a trip to Japan. Tarantino pays homage to Japanese samurai films and Hong Kong martial arts films to make an entertaining story with excellent editing and soundtrack. A perfect start to what's to be expected in Vol. 2., which is where all of the backstories appear.

If you walk away from both parts one and two wondering if there is any symbolism in there, is what you thought you saw what you really saw, and what on earth does that last scene mean?...consider yourself in good company. And my only spoiler, why didn't Lucy Liu's character want to kill Bill as much as Uma Thurman's did? That is, if what you think you see implied in part one is indeed true.

This is Tarantino's best as far as I'm concerned. Every time I see either part one or part two on cable I'll stop what I'm doing and watch. Not recommended if you are squeamish though.
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Quentin's back---badder,bloodier,and better
raysond14 November 2003
Well,ladies and gentlemen,it's a new millennium and Quentin Tarantino has got a new movie for us. After changing the popular film landscape in the 1990's with the classics "Reservoir Dogs","Pulp Fiction",and to a much lesser extent,"Jackie Brown",Tarantino spent a half a decade in hibernation,accompanied by little more than a television set,a movie projector,and collection of Johnny Cash records and a bong. But now he is back after a six year hiatus with "Kill Bill",a thrill ride with the grand style of his earlier films and a brilliant tribute to those Shaw Brothers martial arts flicks of the 1970's and the action heroes of that same decade with includs Charles Bronson,Telly Savalas,Burt Reynolds,Clint Eastwood,Fred Williamson,Steve McQueen,Jim Brown and James Coburn. "Kill Bill" is also a chockablock of references to bygone movies like "Master Of The Flying Guillotine","The Wu",and the television shows like "Hattori Hanzo". This contains many of the elements that have made his earlier films so entertaining and he continues the tradition of that to.

You have the wicked wit,the funky score,the hip-retro cultural artifacts and lots of non-stop,brace in your face action that is not to be missed. Also once again,he has divided the action into chapters with voiceover narrattion to boot,plus he's even got a new trick up his sleeve in which the story is told with some fancy Japanese anime. Basically the film gives much of the screen time to actress Uma Therman and she carries the film with the assurance of a golden diva that she is. The film rises and falls with her,and Thurman pulls that off beautifully in one of the best performances of the year. Thurman plays a professional assassin,attached to a criminal group of bodacious martial arts-trained killers(Vivica A. Fox,Daryl Hannah,and Lucy Liu)who are lead by the unseen,shadowy Bill(unseen in the first installment played by David Carradine). Among the crew she was called Black Mamba,but otherwise simply known as The Bride because she was betrayed on her wedding day when they gunned her down and left her and her near-term child for dead. But she gets her revenge against the ones that tried to kill her and from there the story is a thrill ride of sorts leading up to the next so expect the unexpected. However,a lot of body parts get slashed here and some of it is very gruesome includes scenes of decapitation of heads and a half a head,a leg in severely cut off and a Achilles Tendon gets slashed,a eye and some fingers get chopped off too. This film also has brought back some really good Kung-Fu stars from the 1970's which includes Sonny Chiba,aka "The Street Fighter",and so many more....... I'm surprised that martial arts actress Michelle Yeoh is not in this one. And by the way,what Quentin Tarantino movie wouldn't be correct without his main man Samuel L. Jackson in the role as The Organ Man. Jackson,however was in two Tarantino films including the role he should have gotten the Oscar for in "Pulp Fiction",which also starred Thurman and opposite Pam Grier in "Jackie Brown".

However,the film ends in a cliffhanger so we will have to wait for the next installment which will be out in early 2004. Be forewarned,this not for the kiddies,so use caution when seeing it. In all,one hellva thrill ride.
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3/10
Over-rated, incoherent and boring
james_a_young20 October 2003
Warning: Spoilers
***MILD SPOILERS***

What a dissappointment, especially after the awesome trailer. I had several problems with this film:

1) I didn't care about any of the characters. There was no introduction to any of them (apart from the super-violent anime section introducing Lucy Liu), so I did not understand or care about their motivation. Why was any of this happening?

2) It lacked the dark humour of Tarantino's earlier films, especially in terms of the sparkling character dialogue (e.g. Samuel L Jackson & John Travolta in Pulp Fiction), of which there was none. The dark moments (e.g. the rapist hospital worker) were humour free and quite sickening.

3) Swapping the timelines around is an old Tarantino trick that worked brilliantly in Pulp Fiction, but added nothing to this movie except you knew the ending about 5 minutes into the film.

4) I got bored. The final battle lasts forever and becomes dull after the first few people get their limbs removed. The scenes where Uma Thurman convinces Sonny Chiba to make her a sword add nothing but minutes to the movie.

Why wasn't it edited down and made into a single, complete, BETTER movie? So dissappointed.
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9/10
A movie of visual splendor and a mixture of styles.
Boba_Fett113810 January 2007
This movie is a visual experience of different styles, all combined with also some trademark Tarantino elements.

The movie is obviously a case of style over substance. In essence the movie is just a basic revenge flick without too much depth or meaning. This however is exactly like how Tarantino intended it to be. "Kill Bill: Vol. 1" is simple, straightforward, completely over-the-top but above all beautifully shot and superbly directed. The movie its story comes totally secondary, as Tarantino used this movie as an experimental tool to mix several, mostly Asian cinema, styles together and blend it into one big visual experience of violence and unusual over-the-top looking sequences. His aim was style and with that this movie most certainly does not disappoint.

Always when looking at a Tarantino movie, it becomes obviously that he's a big movie buff and movie lover. Tarantino really shows his love for- and pays homage to Asian cinema and especially anime. Most notably of course in the animated segment (that is great by the way) but also in almost every action/fight sequence in the movie and its violence. It gives the movie its own unique style and an overall atmosphere of 'coolness'.

The violence is definitely brutal and straightforward, as gallons of blood are spilled in this movie. But all of the violence is done in such a, deliberately, over-the-top and fake looking way, that it becomes entertaining, rather than shocking or stomach turning. It even becomes poetically beautiful to watch at times. The action sequences are definitely the best parts of the movie and they are well choreographed and shot. When things get too graphic the movie simple conveniently switches to black & white or turns to other creative cinematic solutions.

The power of this movie is definitely in its visual style and overall style of directing. The movie uses different themes throughout the movie but yet the movie manages to create one big unique identity. The movie never feels incoherent or disjointed in its style or storytelling, though it all widely differs from each other at times. I think that this is mainly thanks to Tarantino's directing, who keeps the movie and different styles all on one and the same line. Visually the movie is also definitely helped by Robert Richardson fantastic cinematography, who should at least had been rewarded with an Oscar nomination for it.

The movie is filled with some big name actors, though not all play a significant part in the movie yet (see "Kill Bill: Vol. 2" for that). Uma Thurman is truly superb as the Bride and I can honestly say that this is her best role out of her career. She also was rewarded with a Golden Globe nomination for it. Also really superb in her role was Lucy Liu. Again, also her best role yet.

Not of all the trademark Tarantino elements work out well in the movie I definitely missed the typical trademark Tarantino dialog in this movie and for also for most part the trademark non-linear storytelling felled pointless and didn't really served a purpose for the story. It therefor really isn't Tarantino's best but it's definitely his most experimental and most visually orientated, style-full, splendid movie.

Unusual, over-the-top but strangely intriguing, entertaining and overall brilliant. Yet another Tarantino must-see!

9/10

http://bobafett1138.blogspot.com/
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1/10
not as good as advertised
afghanwhig29 October 2003
Warning: Spoilers
I don't know what people like about this movie. Everyone told me to see it: the critics, my aunt and the kids I went with. However, I was in for a major surprise. The kids I was with didn't even enjoy the gratutious blood or the "really cool" ninja action. This type of movie (Crouching Tiger Hidden Dragon clone) is getting really old and I wish other moviegoers would start to agree. I really can't think of too much I liked about this movie other than one side character who was particularily interesting. However, she will not be enough reason to go to see part two (I have a feeling she'll make a comeback). Quentin Tarantino is just getting worse with every movie. As a 13 year old boy said tome as we walked out, "It's like they were trying to be funny, but it really wasn't funny. It was just stupid."
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Calling it "Style-over-substance" would be a HUGE overstatement, for it's pretentious and horrid in many ways
patrick_dunne15 March 2006
Warning: Spoilers
I hate this movie a lot. I have been going on about it for a while, so I think it's time to take my anger out by making a review. I think I may have offended some people, and I apologize.

So, here it goes: "Kill Bill" is a very bad movie. I assume that Quentin Tarintino immediately drew in fans with "Pulp Fiction," because of its wit and it was high on the "cool" factor. I saw some of it, and I will say that it was impressive. But, it looks like Tartintino became lazy by making this and co-directing the crappy "Sin City."

The storyline of "Kill Bill" is about its name. Bill attacked a woman who we know as "The Bride." Her name is censored when mentioned. Now, "The Bride" wants revenge on Bill, and members of a gang called "The Deadly Viper Assassin Squad." So, she goes out and finds them and attacks them. The story ends there and it does… well, sort of.

The story is something that was thought up in a few minutes. The Bride wants to kill people, and she does. As simple as that. "Kill Bill Volume One" really is just shallow characters killing each other. First, she battles some woman. I have no clue what her name is though. Then, we find some history of The Bride. After, we find that The Bride was somehow knocked out. I forgot why. When she wakes up, we experience more brutal torture of people. Then, she gets a sword and kills lots of other people. The End.

I find this very similar to "Sin City." It's a gory, shallow and pretentious action film that was made to show off a visual style and action scenes. The only real difference is that "Sin City" had something close to a storyline. This one didn't.

Supposedly, this is Tarintino's homage to martial-arts films. So, that makes it a masterpiece? That makes it get onto the Top 250 Movies? Is that why it's rated so highly? It has plenty of references to other martial-arts films. For example, Uma Thurman wears a suit that looks similar to the suit worn by Bruce Lee in one of his previous films.

Well, "The Ring" has loads of homages to horror films, including "Rosemary's Baby," "Silence of the Lambs," and "Poltergeist." Where's that on the Top 250 movies? Well, the homages seem as a cover-up for the story's' weakness. Why does a bodyguard fight in a skirt? I know people get attacked in a number of outfits, but since when does a bodyguard decide to fight in a schoolgirl outfit? The anime scene is near pointless, and doesn't even look like anime! It looks more like an attempt at drawing realistically, and ends up looking pretty ugly.

Maybe it's because of the action. Well, there are only about two or three fight scenes, and they are only a bit exciting. There are plenty of other movies, which have better action. For example, "Ultraviolet" (Another bad movie) had more action than "Kill Bill" and a number of good fight scenes with good camera angles that gave it some flair. If that had homages to other films, would that be on the Top 250? I must say, even the action in "The Karate Kid" seemed to have a certain wit to it.

All the action in "Kill Bill" is meaningless. It is meant to entertain. But, with loads of blood, what fun could it be? Its fun to watch The Bride slash her way through people, but after severed limbs appear, it loses it's fun. The violence in "Saving Private Ryan" and (I think) the violence in "The Wild Bunch" had purpose. But this, like "Sin City," is just sick, cruel violence.

With that, there are PLENTY of movies with good action such as "Terminator 2: Judgment Day," "Princess Monoke," "House of Flying Daggers" and "The Quick and the Dead." All of these had better storyline that "Kill Bill", even if "The Quick and the Dead" seemed a little weak in that department.

Backing up to horror films, I see that this film plays out like a mix of "Scream" and "Hellraiser: Bloodline." One person repeatedly tortures victims (like Pinhead) with a blade. (Like "Scream") Sadly, it's not as thrilling as "Scream." It's as thrilling as "Hellraiser: Bloodline." The characters are thin. I'm not talking about thin, as in skinny, but lacking detail. Sure, "The Bride" gives a bit of inside info on them (The "inside info" is showing the character killing somebody else.) but the characters usually die after that.

The action seems too unrealistic. Our main character kills plenty of people, but how? She jumps in the air and lands on her sword (It's stuck into the stairs.) but how does she do that? There are some movies with unrealistic action sequences ("House of Flying Daggers," "Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon") but those take place in ancient China. This takes place in a modern day setting and doesn't feel like either one of those films.

That's why I hate the film. I can go on and on, but why should I have to? I suppose I hate it for all these reasons. Maybe the hype killed it. Or, it could be because Dan Grant's review influenced me to hate it. Either way, I don't like it.

Yet, there are some good points to this movie. The action can be fun for some. I don't think torture is necessary though. The music was excellent. I liked the "Bang Bang" and "Twisted Nerve" song. I suppose it does seem interesting at parts, like when it turns into anime (even if the scene seemed pointless) or black-and-white. (But, this was already used in MANY other movies.)

But, it still stinks. To me, this is about as bad as "Ultraviolet"; it's shallow and uses style to cover up its crappiness.

2/10
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1/10
it is kill something allright. but it isn't bill
idonotexist19 December 2003
Warning: Spoilers
******Spoilers*****and a lot of them too****

Since I am not a brainwashed cult follower of Quentin I was able to actually see the movie before rating it as the best thing ever made.

The first minutes were incredible, and I was having the time of my life. Opening scene in black and white bloodied Uma, then fade to black, melancholy music, fading out to perfection, suburbia (toys in yard, nice pretty house) then we have a funny as hell chick fight which is made all the better by a little kid that just stays there.. and says nothing. Basically the imagery is great and sets a mood. Then we have a flashback to the wedding, followed by a hospital scene giving some background of what just happened. And it ends.

The moment you see black mamba telling her big toe to move while the camera repeats this a few times, you have a problem. The first thing you realize in the frames after we finally stop zooming on the toes, is that well, this is nothing more than a Charlie's Angels rip. Concept and idea. Ok there is still time for salvation right? Not really. Because then comes an anime scene that has no purpose at all, and unless you are an anime fan, it will simply suck. Lots of animated blood, still motion drawings and all other things we have seen in countless anime toons on cartoon network come to life. You can safely skip it, not like something valuable will occur. Which is the problem with this whole movie. It has no coherence. You can watch it at any point and not miss a thing. But it gets worse.

Next on the murder list is the same girl we saw in the anime scene, and she is in Japan. So Black Mamba goes to Japan, and what follows for the other half of the movie is mindless kung fu that is bad, a lot of stupid time wasting moments of Japanese people speaking Japanese wise words, which are translated in annoying captions. Actually that would have been a nice touch, but they literally NEVER end. Japanese. Subtititles. More useless preaching. Wise men advice. Captions. Japanese. Captions. Repeat.

Although it is basically badly executed kung fu, even it suffers from some pretty obvious faults. Booze drinking schoolgirl uniform wearing underage female guard? Come on. And just to mention the tie wearing, sword swinging guards (samurai?) that just keep on coming. Please its a parody. A pathetic attempt to mix the infamous Japanese gangs of the 80s and 90s with ancient kung fu and traditions. At least that's the best I could make of it.

I am not going to guess what that movie was trying to be because it clearly had no point. It started great, it fell apart in about 2 minutes. Literally 2 minutes and that is even sadder.

Save your time, watch the first thirty minutes, then go rent a real kung fu flick to fill in the rest.
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10/10
One of my most favourite films
springsunnywinter29 May 2007
When I saw Kill Bill for the first time I just fell in love with the film. Kill Bill is definitely a true masterpiece with a classic story about a brutal betrayal and an epic vendetta! Four years after taking a bullet in the head at her own wedding, The Bride emerges from a coma and decides it's time for payback...with a vengeance. Casting was excellent everyone did a fantastic job in their own place, Uma was the best and no other actress could of taken her place. My favourite member of the deadly viper squad is Elle driver the one with the eye patch I also liked the tune she was whistling in the hospital, I was wondering that how did she lose her eye which was explained in Vol 2. They never showed Bill's face in the film that kept the suspense for the sequel which was a terrific idea especially for me because I never knew what the actor looked like before. The two best scenes are:

1. The animated sequence because it was a different story from the film's which made a suitable mood for the perspective. Overall it is the best idea ever the other two films I've seen with animated sequences are Lola Rennt a German movie & Karam an Indian movie and both of them are my all time most favourite films as well as Kill Bill.

2. The sword fight with the Crazy 88s just before her revenge with O-Ren-Ishi because it was so unexpected when hundreds of them jumped out of nowhere ready to fight. I thought it was going to be simple because Bill was the main target but it turned out to be more difficult.

The main reason why it is one of my favourite is because I'm a huge fan of revenge movies and Kill Bill gives a very deep insight of the topic e.g. Like the Old Klingon Proverb on the screen before the film which is "Revenge is a dish best served cold" & when Hattori Hanzo said that "Revenge is never a straight line. It's a forest and like a forest it's easy to lose your way...to get lost...to forget where you came in". It definitely deserves to be on the IMDb top 250 and Vol 2 was also good but not better than Vol 1.
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1/10
There was promise, but its just too dirty for me.
Brady Redfearn19 September 2006
Warning: Spoilers
So there is a lot of cult movie hype about how great Kill Bill is.....well, the first scene was just a shot of Uma Therman's incredibly beat up face which put a bad taste in my mouth. I gave it some time to get going, but all in all, this, even in its edited form, was such a violently grotesque movie, that I quickly decided it was not for me. I even had TiVo-ed Vol. 2 of the series, but if its anything like the first volume, I don't want anything to do with it. Sure there are plenty of violent movies, but this is just plain gross. So if you ask me, I wouldn't ever ever ever recommend it. I doubt there will be a cleaner version of it too, because it appears that the whole movie is going to be grossly violent.

Who likes to look at Uma Therman, anyway? She freaks me out without portraying a white trash assassin in a movie.

Of course I can see how this is very much a homage to the old-school 70's era martial arts movies, but I just cannot get past the blatant violence. I'm all for realism, but do I really need to know exactly what it is like to see hundreds of people killed all in different ways? The answer is no, thank you.
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idiotic excuse for teenage mentality violence
DUKEJBM23 October 2003
If Tarantino is a genius, then I was a genius at age twelve. With dialog like `silly rabbit, trix are for kids,' I don't understand why people fawn over this juvenile imbecile. His `homages' are just blatant rip offs of movies that we've already seen . Some of which, are so dumb that only Tarantino could be impressed by them. Kill Bill is just an idiotic excuse for teenage mentality violence. How dare they call this excellent film making.
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2/10
The opposite of art
Egg_MacGuffin24 March 2005
Over the course of approx. 12 years, Tarantino has only done one thing: take other people's ideas, mash them together, and call it his own. This is no exception. In fact, it's the best example.

Literally everything in this amalgam was taken (without permission) from another source. Plot points, dialogue, costumes, locations, music, even characters themselves were stolen and placed in this film. Like the movie all you want to, but it won't change the fact that this is perhaps the most unoriginal movie anybody has ever made.

Some day (hopefully soon), Tarantino will steal from someone who doesn't want to be stolen from, and he will be sued for every penny in his unoriginal pockets. But as for the movie itself...what can I say about it that you can't see for yourself by watching other films? Nothing. Many many many people have caught on to what Tarantino has done over and over again since 1992, and many many many people really don't appreciate it.

Keep this in mind if you decide to subject yourself to this horrible excuse for a film: the person who supposedly wrote pulp fiction actually wrote this. This is what that person is capable of. Someone by the name of Roger Avary wrote a vast majority (if not almost all) of pulp fiction...and True Romance...and Natural Born Killers...and perhaps even Reservoir Dogs. But it doesn't end there. In part two of kill bill, Tarantino even steals some more from Avary! It's no wonder why they aren't working together any more...and it's painfully obvious that Tarantino's movies are suffering because of it.

So I have a challenge to anyone and everyone in the world: name one director, besides Tarantino, who has done nothing in their entire cinematic career except steal other people's work. Name one other director, living or dead, who has created nothing on their own. I'll bet my house that you can't.
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Uma Thurman will....Kill Bill
ginger_sonny13 September 2004
Warning: Spoilers
Uma Thurman is the avenging angel in this long-awaited fourth film from Quentin Tarantino. Intense gory martial arts action

Crime boss O'Ren-Ishii (Liu) paces the gallery of the House Of Blue Leaves, watching her subordinates take on The Bride (Thurman), a samurai-sword wielding blonde dressed in a natty, blood-stained yellow tracksuit. As The Bride disembowels and decapitates a dozen yakuza flunkies, pausing only to rip out the eye of one assailant to uncork another plume of blood, one wonders: what does all this mean for feminism?

The first volume of Quentin Tarantino's Kill Bill sees women stalk one another as remorselessly as Sergio Leone's nameless gunfighters. Men hardly get a look in. The face of the titular Bill is concealed from us throughout. In place of machismo, we have a ferocious femininity - the snarl of a mother protecting her child. A different strain of aggression drives this action movie, maternal yet predatory. Tarantino riffs on this with his opening fight where the Bride and Vernita Green (Fox) break off from their knife duel when Green's daughter returns from school.

The Bride is after vengeance. After taking a beating at the hands of her former colleagues from the The Deadly Viper Assassination Squad, the final bullet to her head is delivered by Bill, who also happens to be father of the unborn child. Waking from a four-year long coma, the Bride clutches at her empty womb and unleashes a feral howl. It is a searing moment from Thurman, who showed up to work on the film only two months after giving birth. What does this mean for feminism? Hard to say, except perhaps that hell hath no fury like a heavily pregnant woman gunned down on her wedding day.

A self-conscious interweaving of numerous exploitation genres - in this volume, the influence of Japanese samurai movies and the ultra violence of Takeshi Miike (Ichi The Killer) are particularly strong - unfortunately one also thinks of McG's Charlie's Angels films. Superficially, at least. What with all these kick-ass chicks and Lucy Liu strutting her stuff. In fact, Kill Bill is the anti-Charlie's Angels. It is a deliberate riposte to the cartoon kung fu, lukewarm Matrix leftovers, and shoddy CGI - what Tarantino dismisses as all that "computer game bullshit" - that Hollywood has been dallying with while the director was away. Where McG's franchise speeds you through its incompetence, Tarantino dawdles to shade in more characterisation, to fill in back story, to embellish every inch of the plot before marking it with a signature flourish. The director of the 90s is back and he might as well have signed the right hand corner of every frame.

Unfortunately, he is so brimming with ideas and ambition that his film had to cut in two to meet the needs of distributors. Miramax took this course of action rather than edit their one-time wunderkind. An unsympathetic studio might have trimmed the extended anime sequence about O'Ren-Ishii's troubled childhood, for example, although this is an intense treat depicting events almost too agonizing and heartbreaking to witness in live action.

Kill Bill arrives at a moment in mainstream movies - between the second and third Matrix films, before the final part of The Lord Of The Rings trilogy, ahead of another bloated Harry Potter installment - where Hollywood is willing to test the bladder strength and patience of its audience like never before. Whether it is the fashion for director's cuts or DVD deleted scenes, it is a contemporary truism that art is best served if the excised portions are restored. With this spirit in mind, the dividing of Tarantino's epic into two volumes may be seen as a victory for integrity. However, cynics may suggest that numerous installments mean punters shelling out more times for the same film, both in the cinemas and again for the various extended DVD editions.

Whichever way you want to slice it, this is only half a film. Though it contains many pleasures - and it's great to see such an influential director returning with such a stylistically exuberant work - it is missing the classic satisfying element of any story: an ending.

Verdict A blood-stained love letter to exploitation movies that seems to be missing a few pages.
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