After awakening from a four-year coma, a former assassin wreaks vengeance on the team of assassins who betrayed her.

Director:

Quentin Tarantino

Writers:

Quentin Tarantino, Quentin Tarantino (based on the character "The Bride" created by) (as Q) | 1 more credit »
Popularity
380 ( 54)
Top Rated Movies #178 | Nominated for 1 Golden Globe. Another 29 wins & 102 nominations. See more awards »

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Photos

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
Uma Thurman ... The Bride
Lucy Liu ... O-Ren Ishii
Vivica A. Fox ... Vernita Green
Daryl Hannah ... Elle Driver
David Carradine ... Bill
Michael Madsen ... Budd
Julie Dreyfus ... Sofie Fatale
Chiaki Kuriyama ... Gogo Yubari
Shin'ichi Chiba ... Hattori Hanzo (as Sonny Chiba)
Chia-Hui Liu ... Johnny Mo (as Gordon Liu)
Michael Parks ... Earl McGraw
Michael Bowen ... Buck
Jun Kunimura ... Boss Tanaka
Kenji Ohba ... Bald Guy (Sushi Shop) (as Kenji Oba)
Yuki Kazamatsuri ... Proprietor
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Storyline

The lead character, called 'The Bride,' was a member of the Deadly Viper Assassination Squad, led by her lover 'Bill.' Upon realizing she was pregnant with Bill's child, 'The Bride' decided to escape her life as a killer. She fled to Texas, met a young man, who, on the day of their wedding rehearsal was gunned down by an angry and jealous Bill (with the assistance of the Deadly Viper Assassination Squad). Four years later, 'The Bride' wakes from a coma, and discovers her baby is gone. She, then, decides to seek revenge upon the five people who destroyed her life and killed her baby. The saga of Kill Bill Volume I begins. Written by JD

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Taglines:

Here comes the bride See more »


Motion Picture Rating (MPAA)

Rated R for strong bloody violence, language and some sexual content | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

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Did You Know?

Trivia

The black-and-white photography in the Crazy 88 fight scene is known as a homage to '70s and '80s U.S. television airings of kung fu movies. Black and white (as well as black and red) was used to conceal the shedding of blood from television censors. Originally, no black-and-white photographic effects were going to be used (and in the Japanese version, none are), but the MPAA demanded measures be taken to tone the scene down. Tarantino used the old trick for its intended purpose as well as an homage. See more »

Goofs

In Hattori Hanzo's sushi restaurant, one of Hanzo's knives in the background changes positions between takes. See more »

Quotes

[first lines]
Bill: Do you find me sadistic? You know, I bet I could fry an egg on your head right now, if I wanted to. You know, Kiddo, I'd like to believe that you're aware enough even now to know that there's nothing sadistic in my actions. Well, maybe towards those other... jokers, but not you. No Kiddo, at this moment, this is me at my most...
[cocks pistol]
Bill: masochistic.
The Bride: Bill... it's your baby...
[BLAM!]
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Crazy Credits

The opening titles list some of the cast as "Guest Starring...". See more »

Alternate Versions

Many changes were made to the movie to minimize the violent and adult content when it was broadcast on TBS. One of the most interesting: The "Pussy Wagon" was changed to a "Party Wagon". See more »

Connections

References Tokyo Drifter (1966) See more »

Soundtracks

Death Rides a Horse
Written by Ennio Morricone
Performed by Ennio Morricone
Courtesy of BMG Ricordi S.P.A.
Under license from BMG Film and Television Music
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User Reviews

 
Instant classic, but not for all audiences.
6 March 2005 | by Brent_PSee all my reviews

I know it's a couple years late, but I had to write a review for some of the few people that haven't seen one of my favorite and refreshing I've seen over the last few years. Kill Bill Vol. 1 is yet another quality film of Tarantino's short, but distinguished list.

Kill Bill involves a nameless woman (Uma Thurman) who is slowing seeking revenge on her former hit squad the Viper Squad and her boss Bill (David Caradine.) Her former hit squad wronged her by gunning down her closest friends and family during her wedding and putting her into a coma while being pregnant. A few years later she awakens in a hospital, without child, and tries to track down each member of the squad. As the story progresses (through this film and the sequel), you find out who she really, why Bill wanted her dead and the fate of her daughter.

The movie is really a combination of Tarantino's love for the 70's over-dramatized Kung-Fu movie era and story of revenge with rich dialog. Yes, this movie is violent, but in a cheesy way. This created some controversy and really had audiences stirred up, failing to realize it was supposed to be over the top without no sense of realism. Like I said, it was supposed to be a tribute more so than a gruesome action flick. With all cheesiness aside, I can understand how some people could feel a little woozy after seeing someone lose an arm and having 4 gallons of Kool-Aid red blood shoot out of the body like a whale's blow hole. What really makes this movie is Tarantino ability to make bad to mediocre actors seem like good ones, a smart and hilarious dialog and a good storyline. Of course, this is what he does in pretty much in all of his movies.

There are various plot holes in the story, but we are really meant to ignore them unlike most movies. Just like the gory scenes, come to grips to the fact that the most of the implausibilities are there just to fill in the gaps of the movie. The movie also features a couple of classic Tarantino showdowns, including an unforgettable one with the Japanese infamous crime lord, O-Ren Ishii (Lucy Lui.) Once again, Tarantino puts his imagination at work again in his story telling by using some of his old techniques like jumping timelines and some new ones like adding Japanese animation for character backgrounds.

I wouldn't really recommend this film to someone who is really not from the Pulp Fiction era. This film is really just homage to flicks that frequently appear on Sunday Samurai Showcase, revenge and Tarantino's continuous fascination with Uma Thurman. This film contains extreme violence and sometimes strange dialog coupled with some pretty good acting and directing. If you're not a fan of Tarantino's films, you should pass on this one because it is doesn't stray to far from his other stuff. If you like his other works, this is a must see due to its originality and quality. And, if you just don't like Tarantino himself, and find him annoying like everybody else, I don't blame you but it's still worth your while seeing.


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Frequently Asked Questions

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Details

Country:

USA | Japan

Language:

English | Japanese | French

Release Date:

10 October 2003 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

Quentin Tarantino's Kill Bill: Volume One See more »

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Box Office

Budget:

$30,000,000 (estimated)

Opening Weekend USA:

$22,200,000, 12 October 2003

Gross USA:

$70,099,045

Cumulative Worldwide Gross:

$180,906,076
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Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

DTS | Dolby Digital | SDDS

Aspect Ratio:

2.39 : 1
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