8.1/10
930,783
979 user 149 critic

Finding Nemo (2003)

Trailer
1:52 | Trailer
After his son is captured in the Great Barrier Reef and taken to Sydney, a timid clownfish sets out on a journey to bring him home.

Directors:

Andrew Stanton, Lee Unkrich (co-director)

Writers:

Andrew Stanton (original story by), Andrew Stanton (screenplay by) | 2 more credits »
Reviews
Popularity
660 ( 279)
Top Rated Movies #170 | Won 1 Oscar. Another 48 wins & 62 nominations. See more awards »

Videos

Photos

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
Albert Brooks ... Marlin (voice)
Ellen DeGeneres ... Dory (voice)
Alexander Gould ... Nemo (voice)
Willem Dafoe ... Gill (voice)
Brad Garrett ... Bloat (voice)
Allison Janney ... Peach (voice)
Austin Pendleton ... Gurgle (voice)
Stephen Root ... Bubbles (voice)
Vicki Lewis ... Deb / Flo (voice)
Joe Ranft ... Jacques (voice)
Geoffrey Rush ... Nigel (voice)
Andrew Stanton ... Crush (voice)
Elizabeth Perkins ... Coral (voice)
Nicholas Bird ... Squirt (voice)
Bob Peterson ... Mr. Ray (voice)
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Storyline

A clown fish named Marlin lives in the Great Barrier Reef and loses his son, Nemo, after he ventures into the open sea, despite his father's constant warnings about many of the ocean's dangers. Nemo is abducted by a boat and netted up and sent to a dentist's office in Sydney. While Marlin ventures off to try to retrieve Nemo, Marlin meets a fish named Dory, a blue tang suffering from short-term memory loss. The companions travel a great distance, encountering various dangerous sea creatures such as sharks, anglerfish and jellyfish, in order to rescue Nemo from the dentist's office, which is situated by Sydney Harbour. While the two are searching the ocean far and wide, Nemo and the other sea animals in the dentist's fish tank plot a way to return to the sea to live their lives free again. Written by David Morris

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Taglines:

Grab shell dude! See more »


Certificate:

G | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

View content advisory »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

The second highest grossing film of 2003. See more »

Goofs

(at around 47 mins) When Marlin is telling his story to the small turtles in the EAC, their shells look different than in other scenes. See more »

Quotes

[first lines]
Marlin: Wow.
Coral: Mmm.
Marlin: Wow.
Coral: Mm-hmm.
Marlin: Wow.
Coral: Yes, Marlin. I... No, I see it. It's beautiful.
Marlin: So, Coral, when you said you wanted an ocean view, you didn't think you were going to get the whole ocean, did you? Huh?
[deep breath]
Marlin: Oh, yeah. A fish can breathe out here. Did your man deliver, or did he deliver?
[...]
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Crazy Credits

The first names of "Production Babies" are listed towards the end of the credits. See more »

Alternate Versions

The 4:3 version of the movie is not cropped as with most movies, but actually re-rendered with scenes rearranged to preserve composition. See more »

Connections

Referenced in The Breaker Upperers (2018) See more »

Soundtracks

Just Keep Swimming
(uncredited)
Sung by Ellen DeGeneres
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User Reviews

 
Pixar's best feature to date
15 October 2005 | by kylopodSee all my reviews

I have enjoyed most of the computer-animated films made so far, ranging from Pixar films like "Toy Story" and "The Incredibles" to DreamWorks films like "Shrek." But "Finding Nemo" is the one that remains unparalleled, not because of its comedy or creativity, both of which are equaled in the "Toy Story" movies and in "Monsters Inc.," but because it truly, more than any of the previous computer-animated features, reinvents the genre of the children's animated film.

Humor in traditional animation is usually based on broad slapstick and physical exaggeration. There are occasional nods to this brand of humor in "Finding Nemo," as when a flock of seagulls ram into a boat and we see their beaks crowing on the other side of the sail. But such sequences only call attention to how far this movie generally departs from old cartoon conventions. Instead, the movie invests its world of sentient animals with a surprisingly scientific texture. All of the animals are based on real species. The fish tank is constructed out of real devices. There is a strong sense of locale, as Marlin (Albert Brooks) travels across the Pacific to Australia, where even the animals speak with an Australian accent. In a scene that I'm sure Gary Larson of "Far Side" fame loved, a pelican discusses with a group of fish the intricate details of dentistry. The fact that the animals talk and understand what's going on is treated as though it were a natural feature of the world. The realism is so striking that by the end of the film, you'll almost believe it possible for fish to plot an escape from a tank.

Far from making the film pedantic, this approach results in an intelligent but still entertaining picture. Most of the humor is based on parodies of human behavior: repentant sharks start a club that's like Alcoholics Anonymous, a school of fish act like obnoxious DJs while forming themselves into spectacular patterns, and a four-year-old girl behaves like most kids that age, oblivious and destructive. The manner in which Marlin finds his way to his son is so inventive that we can forgive the film for the number of coincidences involved.

The story employs the same basic formula used in "Toy Story," in which two characters, one uptight and the other clueless, are thrown together as they're forced to journey through a world populated by creatures that are a lot more knowing than the humans realize. This movie, however, creates a unique character in Dory (Ellen DeGeneres), a fish with short-term memory loss. To give a cartoon character a real human disorder is risky, to say the least, and I'm glad the filmmakers didn't lose the nerve to include this ingenious device, which not only generates some of the film's biggest laughs, but reinforces the character interaction that is so central to the story. This is in fact the only Pixar film to feature true character development. In the course of his voyage, Marlin learns to be more adventurous, getting parenting tips from a surfer-dude turtle voiced by the film's director Andrew Stanton, while his son Nemo learns to be self-reliant.

Of course, none of the sharks, jellyfish, whales, gulls, pelicans, lobsters, and humans that Marlin encounters along the way really mean any harm. They're just doing what they do. As Nigel the Pelican tells Nemo at one point, "Fish gotta swim, birds gotta eat." That's perhaps the film's most interesting insight, that there are no true villains, just creatures that act according to their nature, and a few that transcend it.


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Frequently Asked Questions

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Details

Official Sites:

Official Facebook | Official site | See more »

Country:

USA | Australia

Language:

English

Release Date:

30 May 2003 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

Finding Nemo 3D See more »

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Box Office

Budget:

$94,000,000 (estimated)

Opening Weekend USA:

$70,251,710, 1 June 2003

Gross USA:

$380,843,261

Cumulative Worldwide Gross:

$940,350,194
See more on IMDbPro »

Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

DTS (Digital DTS Sound)| Dolby Digital | SDDS | Dolby Atmos (3D re-release)| Dolby Surround 7.1 (3D re-release)

Color:

Color

Aspect Ratio:

1.33 : 1
See full technical specs »

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