7.7/10
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Battle Royale (2000)

Batoru rowaiaru (original title)
Not Rated | | Adventure, Drama, Sci-Fi | 16 December 2000 (Japan)
Trailer
0:47 | Trailer

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ON DISC
In the future, the Japanese government captures a class of ninth-grade students and forces them to kill each other under the revolutionary "Battle Royale" act.

Director:

Kinji Fukasaku

Writers:

Koushun Takami (novel), Kenta Fukasaku (screenplay)
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Popularity
1,610 ( 616)
7 wins & 8 nominations. See more awards »

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
Tatsuya Fujiwara ... Shuya Nanahara - otoko 15-ban
Aki Maeda ... Noriko Nakagawa - onna 15-ban
Tarô Yamamoto ... Shôgo Kawada - otoko 5-ban
Takeshi Kitano ... Kitano-sensei (as Bito Takeshi)
Chiaki Kuriyama ... Takako Chigusa - onna 13-ban
Sôsuke Takaoka ... Hiroki Sugimura - otoko 11-ban
Takashi Tsukamoto ... Shinji Mimura - otoko 19-ban
Yukihiro Kotani Yukihiro Kotani ... Yôshitoki Kuninobu - otoko 7-ban
Eri Ishikawa Eri Ishikawa ... Yukie Utsumi - onna 2-ban
Sayaka Kamiya Sayaka Kamiya ... Satomi Noda - onna 17-ban
Takayo Mimura Takayo Mimura ... Kayoko Kotôhiki - onna 8-ban
Yutaka Shimada Yutaka Shimada ... Yûtaka Seto - otoko 12-ban
Aki Unone Aki Unone ... Fumiyo Fujiyôshi - onna 18-ban (as Aki Inoue)
Ren Matsuzawa Ren Matsuzawa ... Keita Îjima - otoko 2-ban
Hirohito Honda Hirohito Honda ... Kazushi Nîda - otoko 16-ban
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Storyline

Forty-two students, three days, one deserted Island: welcome to Battle Royale. A group of ninth-grade students from a Japanese high school have been forced by legislation to compete in a Battle Royale. The students are sent off to kill each other in a no-holds-barred game to the death, until one survives -- or they all die. Some decide to play the game like the psychotic Kiriyama or the sexual Mitsuko, while others are trying to find a way to get off the Island without violence. However, as the numbers dwindle is there any way for Shuya and his classmates to survive? Written by Prissy Panda Princess

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Taglines:

42 Students, Three Days, One Survivor, No Rules. See more »


Certificate:

Not Rated | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

View content advisory »
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Details

Official Sites:

Official site [Japan]

Country:

Japan

Language:

Japanese

Release Date:

16 December 2000 (Japan) See more »

Also Known As:

Battle Royale See more »

Filming Locations:

Hachijo Island, Tokyo, Japan See more »

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Box Office

Budget:

$4,500,000 (estimated)

Opening Weekend:

JPY 67,566,100 (Japan), 21 December 2000, Limited Release
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Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

| (director's cut)

Sound Mix:

Dolby Digital

Color:

Color

Aspect Ratio:

1.78 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

The magazine containing bomb-making instructions that is used by Shinji Mimura and his gang is titled "Hara Hara Tokei" ("The Ticking Clock"). This magazine is a real bomb-making magazine published by an anti-Japanese-Government activist group called Higashi Ajia Hannichi Buso Sensen (East Asia Anti-Japanese Armed Front) from the 1970s. See more »

Goofs

Bags that are given to students aren't big enough to fit some of the weapons (e.g. crossbow, sickle, etc). See more »

Quotes

[first lines]
Reporter: This year Zentsuji Middle School number 4's Class E was chosen from among 43,000 Ninth grade classes. This year's game, said to be more blistering than the last - - Oh look there! There she is! The winner's a girl! Surviving a fierce battle that raged two days, seven hours, and 43 minutes - the winner is a girl! Look, she's smiling! Smiling! The girl definitely just smiled!
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Crazy Credits

As the credits roll, a class picture is displayed, showing all of the students that have been killed in the Battle Royale, including the two transfer students. See more »

Alternate Versions

The Special Version includes the following:
  • Redone opening titles
  • Redone sound effects
  • Added CGI blood to make the shootouts more graphic Also, many shots were added, deleted, reedited, and extended for pacing and clarity purposes, including the following:
  • A longer basketball sequence
  • Added reaction shots of the kids in the classroom to Kitano's "Do you know this law" question, and after Kuninobu's death.
  • A flashback shot of Mizuho and Inada and Kaori Minami to remind us of who they were when we see their bodies.
  • Closer shots of Takiguchi and Hatagami's corpses
  • An additional shot of Nanahara weeping at the top of the lighthouse
  • Additional shots of postcards from Mimura's uncle
  • Kitano shutting down power to the computers and ordering the soldiers to reboot after the Third Man attack
  • A scene with Mitsuko as a 9-year-old coming home to find a pedophile in her house.
  • An additional shot of Mimura triggering the explosives on the truck
  • Requiems that show the real flashbacks, and we hear the dialog during Noriko's dream.
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Connections

Referenced in The Starving Games (2013) See more »

Soundtracks

Radetzky March
Op 228
Johann Strauss Sr.
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Frequently Asked Questions

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User Reviews

You'll get it if you know modern Japan
14 May 2004 | by tkuhnsSee all my reviews

Most of the reviewers here speak from their own viewpoints, i.e. non-Japanese westerners, and they praise/knock the movie based on its violence, plot, etc. That's fine. But through their ignorance of the culture this film springs from, they are missing its subtleties.

I've been teaching in a Japanese high school for three years now. Once I saw this movie, I could instantly appreciate its skill and surprising frankness at commenting on some of the sad and strange realities of Japan's modern youth.

Japan is a culture obsessed with youth. Almost everything here is tailored to the under-30 (and much younger, actually) crowd. For example, most westerners watching Japanese TV will be surprised at how childish it seems. The things that seem childish to your average American junior-high student are very appealing for a Japanese high-school student. Girls in their 30s desperately try to be "cute" to attract guys. Adults and children alike read comics by the droves, and sometimes pops up a strange, not-too-well-hidden undercurrent of pedophilia.

This movie takes the heavily cliquish, often childish, and often incomprehensible (to me) social system of young Japanese boys and girls and gives them guns. This is the natural result. Take it from me, the characters and situations are very realistic.

This gets mixed with the growing anxiety among the older generation at the rising rudeness and rebellion of the new generation in a culture that values politeness above all else. From a frustrated and humiliated teacher; to students killing each other over seemingly unimportant squabbles; to the overly-cutesy, peppy training video that perfectly mimics nearly any show on NHK these days -- this film subtly and brilliantly comments on half-a-dozen issues that weigh heavily on the minds of Japanese people today. That's why it was such a big hit in Japan.

Maybe you just have to live here to get it. I give it 5 stars.


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