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The Bourne Identity (2002)

PG-13 | | Action, Mystery, Thriller | 14 June 2002 (USA)
Trailer
2:09 | Trailer
A man is picked up by a fishing boat, bullet-riddled and suffering from amnesia, before racing to elude assassins and attempting to regain his memory.

Director:

Doug Liman

Writers:

Tony Gilroy (screenplay), W. Blake Herron (screenplay) (as William Blake Herron) | 1 more credit »
Reviews
Popularity
951 ( 358)
3 wins & 6 nominations. See more awards »

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
Matt Damon ... Bourne
Franka Potente ... Marie
Chris Cooper ... Conklin
Clive Owen ... The Professor
Brian Cox ... Ward Abbott
Adewale Akinnuoye-Agbaje ... Wombosi
Gabriel Mann ... Zorn
Walton Goggins ... Research Tech
Josh Hamilton ... Research Tech
Julia Stiles ... Nicolette
Orso Maria Guerrini ... Giancarlo (as Orso Maria-Guerrini)
Tim Dutton ... Eamon
Denis Braccini Denis Braccini ... Picot
Nicky Naudé ... Castel (as Nicky Naude)
David Selburg David Selburg ... Marshall
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Storyline

When a body is recovered at sea still alive, the mystery man (Damon) seems to have forgotten everything in life, including who he was. Eventually he begins to remember smaller details in life and soon finds out that his name was Jason Bourne. What he doesn't like is the gun and fake passports belonging to him. Now Bourne, and his new friend, Marie Helena Kreutz (Potente) travel from country to country in search of his new identity. But someone is not happy to see him alive, and is frantically trying to track him down. Written by Peet

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Taglines:

He never asked to be Bourne. See more »


Motion Picture Rating (MPAA)

Rated PG-13 for violence and some language | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

View content advisory »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

In 1983, Universal had planned to make this with Burt Reynolds as Jason Bourne and Jack Clayton as director. Due to Reynolds busy schedule, the movie stalled. See more »

Goofs

When the fishing boat captain treats Bourne's wounds he checks his whole body and discovers the strange scar on his hip. But as this is a scar and not a wound requiring attention there is no reason for him to cut out the ID chip from his hip. The clues to Bourne's identity should never have been revealed from this. Bourne should leave the fishing boat with no clue to his identity and the film's writers would have had to find another way to reveal his identity. See more »

Quotes

Marie: He went out the window... why would someone do that?
See more »

Crazy Credits

A thunderstorm sounds in the background of the Universal logo. See more »

Alternate Versions

The newly released DVD of the film contains the original never before seen opening to the film in which Bourne is seen in the same town seen at the end of the film wandering around, asking if anyone has seen the girl in the photo he is holding. After being pointed in the wrong direction, Bourne then falls to the ground, drugged, and the picture of Marie that he was holding drops from his hand. See more »

Connections

Referenced in Alex Rider: Operation Stormbreaker (2006) See more »

Soundtracks

Ready Steady Go
Written by Paul Oakenfold and Andy Gray
Performed by Paul Oakenfold (as Oakenfold) with Vocals by Asher D.
Courtesy of Maverick Recording Company
By Arrangement with Warner Special Products and Courtesy of Mushroom Records (UK) Ltd. / Perfecto Records
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User Reviews

 
Hooray for decent, more realistic spy films!
17 March 2003 | by SleelSee all my reviews

I have grown extremely tired of the typical formula spy film like Bond, or the juvenile stunt exhibition "Triple X." There have been a bare handful of spy films that feature relatively realistic spy thrillers, especially recently with a concentration on spectacular movies that have less substance than cotton candy.

Besides "The Bourne Identity," "Ronin" is the only other recent spy movie I can think of that didn't feature skydiving, bungie jumping, skiing downhill while shooting innumerable bad guys, laser pens, cars with ejection seats, or silicone breasted women with names you'd be vaguely embarrassed to say in front of your mother. Most of the crap that passes for an espionage film has no plot or reason for existing other than to meet a quota of explosions and cleavage in order to draw the summer action film crowd.

While "Bourne" does not have a particularly deep plot, it is consistent and focused. The focus is entirely upon Bourne and how he is to deal with having no memory of his past, being hunted without knowing why. Some people have complained about being confused by the movie. I for one, do not need to have everything spelled out since in many cases this smacks of unreality in the first place; the essence of espionage is drawing conclusions from very sketchy information. If you can't handle a little of that, you probably should stick to Disney films or TV's Scooby Doo where everything is explained in the end. We never find out about what is in the case in "Ronin" and I can live without some information being filled in about Bourne's past.

To those who have moaned about the incompatibility of the book and the movie, seek help. There are probably several things that work in the book that would either be boring and take too much screen time to explain, or would be viewed as cliche to modern screen audiences. As I remember, I liked the book, and I definitely like this movie. I view any movie adaptation as an interpretation of the book rather than a translation from words to pictures anyway.

As for realism, most of the action scenes are believable, no super-gadgets are to be seen, no incredibly lovely models fall madly in bed with Bourne, and the hero shows definite signs of physical vulnerability despite a very high level of training and competance. As someone who has trained in martial arts for over 10 years, unrealistic fight scenes are a pet peeve. The fights in "Bourne" are fast, nasty, and very realistic while still being entertaining for the layman. (And yes, taking a gun away from some idiot who is standing well within your striking radius without getting shot is definitely doable, though I had serious doubts until we tested it for ourselves with plastic dart guns in the dojo several years ago).

While not being perfect, "The Bourne Identity" is, simply put, several grades above the typical spy film. Being focused on an individual level rather than involving itself huge political ramifications lends it another layer of respectability rather than detracting from it as some comments have implied since it remains a human problem on a comprehensible scale. The mysteries that are left are bigger mysteries for Bourne than us, and I think should be viewed as intentional omissions rather than loose ends. The implausibilities are kept to a minimum and the realism to as high a level as possible while still being spectacular enough to meet the expectations of the genre.


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Frequently Asked Questions

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Details

Official Sites:

Universal [United States]

Country:

USA | Germany | Czech Republic | France

Language:

English | French | German | Dutch | Italian | Yoruba

Release Date:

14 June 2002 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

The Bourne Identity See more »

Filming Locations:

Seine River, Paris, France See more »

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Box Office

Budget:

$60,000,000 (estimated)

Opening Weekend USA:

$27,118,640, 16 June 2002

Gross USA:

$121,661,683

Cumulative Worldwide Gross:

$214,034,224
See more on IMDbPro »

Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

DTS | Dolby Digital | SDDS | DTS (DTS: X)

Color:

Color

Aspect Ratio:

2.39 : 1
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