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Who’s your favorite Best Actor Oscar winner of 1970s: Jack Nicholson, Marlon Brando, Dustin Hoffman … ? [Poll]

Who’s your favorite Best Actor Oscar winner of 1970s: Jack Nicholson, Marlon Brando, Dustin Hoffman … ? [Poll]
Some of the most legendary actors in Hollywood history won their Oscars in the 1970s. The Best Actor category of this decade was stacked with some of the biggest stars of the time, many of which have lived on for generations. But which Best Actor Oscar winner of the 1970s is your absolute favorite? Take a trip down memory lane and vote in our poll below.

George C. Scott, “Patton” (1970) — Scott took home the Best Actor prize for “Patton,” which also won Best Picture. In the film he plays the titular George S. Patton, the famous hot-tempered U.S. army general who led troops during World War II. He had previously been nominated for “Anatomy of a Murder” (1959), “The Hustler” (1961), and later for “The Hospital” (1971). Scott notably declined his nomination and win for “Patton.”

SEERobert De Niro (‘Raging Bull’) knocks out all contenders to be your top Best Actor Oscar winner of 1980s [Poll Results]

Gene Hackman,
See full article at Gold Derby »

Tribeca 2018: Alexander Payne Reflects On Why Downsizing “Tanked” and Talks Directing Jack Nicholson

  • HeyUGuys
As part of the 17th annual Tribeca Film Festival’s Tribeca Talks: Director’s Series Oscar-winning filmmaker Alexander Payne took to the stage to discuss his career to date which includes seven feature films: Election, Citizen Ruth, Downsizing, The Descendants, Sideways, About Schmidt and Nebraska. Payne was joined by fellow Nebraskan, comedian and multiple Emmy-winning TV host, Dick Cavett.

Cavett asked Payne about the experience of directing the great Jack Nicholson on About Schmidt. “He made me a better director,” Payne revealed. “There’s a lot of pressure when you’re a director to say the right thing. First of all to figure out what you want, if there’s something you want and then the right thing to say and often you can’t think of the brilliant thing to say, the “actable” verb. You have to give a result or a line reading. Anyway, I would say something
See full article at HeyUGuys »

Who’s your favorite Best Supporting Actor Oscar winner of 1980s: Jack Nicholson, Kevin Kline, Denzel Washington … ? [Poll]

Who’s your favorite Best Supporting Actor Oscar winner of 1980s: Jack Nicholson, Kevin Kline, Denzel Washington … ? [Poll]
Like the other acting winners of the 1980s, the Oscar for Best Supporting Actor went to big stars and character actors alike. The ’80s featured big-name winners like Jack Nicholson, Kevin Kline, Sean Connery and Michael Caine alongside hardworking veterans like John Gielgud, Louis Gossett Jr. and Don Ameche. The Academy also rewarded emerging talent, like Timothy Hutton, Haing S. Ngor and the now double-champ Denzel Washington.

So who is your favorite Best Supporting Actor winner of the 1980s? Look back on each performance and be sure to vote in our poll below.

Timothy Hutton, “Ordinary People” (1980) — Hutton came out of the gate strong with his heartbreaking performance in Best Picture winner “Ordinary People.” Hutton plays Conrad Jarrett, a teenager wracked with guilt after his brother is killed in a boating accident. Hutton is clearly the lead of the film, but at age 20, the studio may have felt it fairer
See full article at Gold Derby »

Kathy Bates (‘Misery’) is your #1 fan after being voted top Best Actress Oscar winner of 1990s [Poll Results]

Kathy Bates (‘Misery’) is your #1 fan after being voted top Best Actress Oscar winner of 1990s [Poll Results]
Kathy Bates just took a big swing at her fellow Best Actress Oscar winners. The legendary actress has won Gold Derby’s poll asking you to vote for your favorite winner of the 1990s, for her iconic role as demented fan Annie Wilkes in the film adaptation of Stephen King‘s “Misery” (1990).

Bates won our poll with 23% of the vote, squeaking out a victory over several beloved actresses. Jodie Foster (“The Silence of the Lambs”) and Jessica Lange (“Blue Sky”) tied for second place with 19% each. Coming in fourth place was Frances McDormand (“Fargo”), who also happens to be the frontrunner to win Best Actress at this year’s Oscars. Hilary Swank (“Boys Don’t Cry”) rounded out the top five at 9%.

SEEStephen King movies best performances: Where does Bill Skarsgard (‘It’) rank in top 10?

From there we have Holly Hunter (“The Piano”) at 6%, Susan Sarandon (“Dead Man Walking”) at
See full article at Gold Derby »

2018 BAFTA Awards: Lesley Manville has home-court advantage over Allison Janney, Laurie Metcalf

2018 BAFTA Awards: Lesley Manville has home-court advantage over Allison Janney, Laurie Metcalf
Lesley Manville has lost her previous two BAFTA Awards bids but third time could be the charm on Sunday as she contends for her scene-stealing turn in “Phantom Thread.” This home-grown talent could be the beneficiary of a split vote between two of the other Best Supporting Actress nominees: Americans Allison Janney (“I, Tonya”) and Laurie Metcalf (“Lady Bird”).

While Janney won the Globe, Critics Choice and SAG awards, there is still a sense that this race is far from being labelled a done deal. This isn’t a Gary Oldman situation, wherein his win is all but secured (clear your mantlepiece, Gary, you’ve got a statuette to make room for). Rather, this is still a race that is in flux.

That is where Manville comes in. She and her film made a surprising surge late in the awards race. The veteran character actress numbers among the six Oscar
See full article at Gold Derby »

‘Get Out,’ ‘Call Me by Your Name’ would only be second pair of Oscar screenplay winners without Globe nominations

‘Get Out,’ ‘Call Me by Your Name’ would only be second pair of Oscar screenplay winners without Globe nominations
Get Out” and “Call Me by Your Name” each has a Writers Guild Award to its name, with respective Best Original Screenplay and Best Adapted Screenplay victories Sunday, but that’s not the only thing the films have in common. Neither script was nominated at the Golden Globes, which only has one screenplay category. If they both go on to win their corresponding screenplay Oscars, they’d only be the second pair of script winners that were snubbed by the Globes.

The only pair to accomplish this was 2002’s “Talk to Her,” which won original, and “The Pianist,” which won adapted.” The Globes awarded “About Schmidt” over “Adaptation,” “Chicago,” “Far From Heaven” and “The Hours.” If that’s not enough, “Talk to Her” and “The Pianist” also claimed their Oscars without WGA mentions — the former was ineligible and the latter was not nominated.

See Writers Guild Awards winners: ‘Call Me
See full article at Gold Derby »

Who’s your favorite Best Actor Oscar winner of the 1990s: Anthony Hopkins, Tom Hanks, Al Pacino … ? [Poll]

Who’s your favorite Best Actor Oscar winner of the 1990s: Anthony Hopkins, Tom Hanks, Al Pacino … ? [Poll]
The Best Actor Oscar winners of the 1990s include some of the most legendary actors in film history, like Anthony Hopkins, Al Pacino, Tom Hanks and Jack Nicholson. We’ve also seen actors springboard off their victories to have fruitful careers in film, like Geoffrey Rush and Nicolas Cage. Now, two decades later, which do you consider the greatest Best Actor winner of the 1990s?

Refamiliarize yourself with the winners and be sure to vote in our poll below. (See 2018 Oscar predictions for Best Actor.)

Jeremy Irons, “Reversal of Fortune” (1990) — The ’90s began with Jeremy Irons being awarded for “Reverse of Fortune,” in which the actor plays Claus von Bulow, a man charged with attempted murder after his wife goes into diabetic shock. Despite a long career in film this remains Irons’ only nomination and win, though he has won two Emmys for voiceover work and another for his performance in 2005’s “Elizabeth I.
See full article at Gold Derby »

Who’s your favorite Best Actress Oscar winner of the 1990s: Jessica Lange, Frances McDormand, Holly Hunter … ? [Poll]

Who’s your favorite Best Actress Oscar winner of the 1990s: Jessica Lange, Frances McDormand, Holly Hunter … ? [Poll]
The Best Actress Oscar winners of the 1990s have all had long careers of success in Hollywood to varying degrees. From overdue actresses finally getting their first statue like Susan Sarandon to younger talent like Gwyneth Paltrow, the decade is full of diverse performances. Now, two decades later, which do you think holds up as the top Best Actress performance of the ’90s?

Take a look back on each winning performance and make sure to vote in our poll at the bottom. (See 2018 Oscar predictions for Best Actress.)

Kathy Bates, “Misery” (1990) — Kathy Bates in “Misery” is a great example of an actress breaking through in an unconventional way. Playing Annie Wilkes, deranged fan of an author who tortures him mercilessly, Bates became one of few actresses to win for a pure horror movie. She would later earn supporting nominations for “Primary Colors” (1998) and “About Schmidt” (2002).

SEEOscar snub explained: Did ‘Three
See full article at Gold Derby »

‘Downsizing’: What Went Wrong with Alexander Payne’s Social Satire

  • Indiewire
‘Downsizing’: What Went Wrong with Alexander Payne’s Social Satire
It’s easy to forget how many times Alexander Payne has pulled off movies that, on their face, were nowhere close to commercial. Payne has crossed over between the arthouse and the mainstream throughout his career. He’s a strong writer-director with a good nose for what will play for smart audiences all over the country. Born in Omaha, Neb., he has a gift for finding the universal in ordinary people; he has the populist touch. Making people laugh is a surefire way of getting stories across — except when they don’t land.

Payne has enjoyed a remarkable run. He and his writing partner Jim Taylor (who dreamed up this “getting small” idea with his brother Doug) are Oscar perennials. They were nominated for writing “Election” (1999; $17 million worldwide) and producing with Jim BurkeThe Descendants” (2011; $175 million worldwide), a Best Picture nominee. Payne has won twice, for writing “Sideways” with Taylor
See full article at Indiewire »

‘Downsizing’: What Went Wrong with Alexander Payne’s Social Satire

‘Downsizing’: What Went Wrong with Alexander Payne’s Social Satire
It’s easy to forget how many times Alexander Payne has pulled off movies that, on their face, were nowhere close to commercial. Payne has crossed over between the arthouse and the mainstream throughout his career. He’s a strong writer-director with a good nose for what will play for smart audiences all over the country. Born in Omaha, Neb., he has a gift for finding the universal in ordinary people; he has the populist touch. Making people laugh is a surefire way of getting stories across — except when they don’t land.

Payne has enjoyed a remarkable run. He and his writing partner Jim Taylor (who dreamed up this “getting small” idea with his brother Doug) are Oscar perennials. They were nominated for writing “Election” (1999; $17 million worldwide) and producing with Jim Burke “The Descendants” (2011; $175 million worldwide), a Best Picture nominee. Payne has won twice, for writing “Sideways” with Taylor
See full article at Thompson on Hollywood »

‘Downsizing’ Review: Matt Damon Gets Small In A Smart, Funny & Human Movie With Big Ideas

‘Downsizing’ Review: Matt Damon Gets Small In A Smart, Funny & Human Movie With Big Ideas
There is no smarter director of wry and human comedy than Alexander Payne, whose filmography includes gems like Election, Nebraska, About Schmidt and Oscar-winning scripts like Sideways and The Descendants. As I say in my video review above, his latest, Downsizing, fits right in but also might be his most ambitious movie yet — certainly it is technically. In the vein of such great cinematic satirists as Billy Wilder and Preston Sturges, Payne and co-writer Jim Taylor
See full article at Deadline Movie News »

Election

We’ve all met Tracy Flick — the eager-beaver student that charms the right teachers, wins all the awards and corners the big scholarships. Alexander Payne’s witty, perceptive look at High School shows the predicament of a model teacher who can’t help but sabotage a pupil’s run for class president. Reese Witherspoon’s wholly original characterization scores big, and Matthew Broderick plays what is probably his best screen role.

Election

Blu-ray

The Criterion Collection 904

1999 / Color / 2:35 widescreen / 103 min. / available through The Criterion Collection / Street Date December 5, 2017 / 39.95

Starring: Matthew Broderick, Reese Witherspoon, Chris Klein, Jessica Campbell, Phil Reeves, Molly Hagan, Delaney Driscoll, Mark Harelik, Colleen Camp.

Cinematography: James Glennon

Film Editor: Kevin Tent

Production Design: Jane Ann Stewart

Original Music: Rolfe Kent

Written by Alexander Payne, Jim Taylor from a novel by Tom Perotta

Produced by Albert Berger, David Gale, Keith Samples, Ron Yerxa

Directed by Alexander Payne

“What
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

Get in the zone: the many adaptations of Roadside Picnic

Padraig Cotter Oct 11, 2017

The sci-fi novel Roadside Picnic has inspired works in film, TV, books and even videogames...

Stalker was the final film Andrei Tarkovsky made in the Soviet Union, and is a hypnotic, beguiling experience that refuses to surrender to any one interpretation. That hasn’t stopped critics and fans attempting to apply their own readings of course; is it a religious allegory, a commentary on life in the Soviet Union, an essay on filmmaking or is it about three miserable Russian blokes having a bit of an aimless wander? It could be all of the above, or none - it’s up to each viewer to decide for themselves.

The film is a loose adaptation of Russian sci-fi novel Roadside Picnic by Boris and Arkady Strugatsky, and while on the surface they share similar characters and themes, they play out very differently. Even more interesting is how Roadside Picnic
See full article at Den of Geek »

Downsizing Trailer Shrinks Matt Damon and Kristen Wiig

  • MovieWeb
Downsizing Trailer Shrinks Matt Damon and Kristen Wiig
Paramount Pictures has released the first trailer and photo for Downsizing, the latest from fimmaker Alexander Payne, which tackles the global issue of over-population in a very peculiar way. The title does not refer to downsizing on a corporate level, as it pertains to company-wide layoffs, but rather the downsizing, or miniaturization of every day people. While this gimmick has certainly been tackled before, Downsizing takes a global approach to a rather silly trope that has been used countless times in movies such as Honey, I Shrunk the Kids, and even Marvel's Ant-Man.

Downsizing imagines what might happen if, as a solution to over-population, Norwegian scientists discover how to shrink humans to five inches tall and propose a 200-year global transition from big to small. People soon realize how much further money goes in a miniaturized world, and with the promise of a better life, everyman Paul Safranek (Matt Damon
See full article at MovieWeb »

‘Downsizing’ Review: Alexander Payne Goes Big by Going Small and Slightly Overreaches

The formidable critic Anthony Lane once collectivized the archetypal Alexander Payne lead — that unmistakably downbeat beast — as the “beached male.” Matt Damon is certainly no such thing. Nor is his Paul Safranek, the character he plays in Payne’s new film, Downsizing, a remarkably uncharacteristic environmentally conscious sci-fi comedy that poses this question: in a world stretched to breaking point by overpopulation, food and water shortages, overflowing landfills, and so on: would our problems not be solved if we were all just a little smaller?

It’s a fine conceit from Payne and his long-time writing partner Jim Taylor, but one that poses far, far more questions than it hopes to answer. Viewers should perhaps not be too hard on themselves if their minds wander away from the theater (and perhaps Payne’s narrative) at times to consider all the possibilities of a place such as Leisureland, the miniature world
See full article at The Film Stage »

'Downsizing' Has Big Buzz Out of the Venice Film Festival

  • Movies.com
Alexander Payne and Jim Taylor have been making movies of substance for decades, since 1996's Citizen Ruth. Their latest, Downsizing, about a man (Matt Damon) who decides to shrink himself to make his life easier, promises to be another entertaining and enlightening feature with socially minded subject matter. And yet again, the duo is garnering tremendous acclaim for their work.  While Payne and Taylor have seen negative reviews for writing ventures such as Jurassic Park III and I Now Pronounce You Chuck & Larry, their own movies, cowritten by both and directed by Payne (Citizen RuthElection, About Schmidt, Sideways), have an average Rotten Tomatoes score of 88.3%. If we include movies where Taylor is a producer but not writer (add...

Read More
See full article at Movies.com »

Downsizing Movie Review (Venice Film Festival 2017)

  • ShockYa
Downsizing Movie Review (Venice Film Festival 2017)
Title: Downsizing Director: Alexander Payne Cast: Matt Damon, Kristen Wiig, Christoph Waltz, Hong Chau, Alec Baldwin, Neil Patrick Harris, Maribeth Monroe and Jason Sudeikis. Thomas Robert Malthus had already predicted the perils of over population, back in the eighteenth century. The witty director of ‘About Schmidt,’ ‘Sideways,’ ‘The Descendants,’ ‘Nebraska,’ Alexander Payne, seems to provide […]

The post Downsizing Movie Review (Venice Film Festival 2017) appeared first on Shockya.com.
See full article at ShockYa »

Alexander Payne On ‘Downsizing’, Opening Venice & Snarky Tailors

Alexander Payne On ‘Downsizing’, Opening Venice & Snarky Tailors
Exclusive: Tomorrow, Alexander Payne's Downsizing will open the 74th Venice Film Festival. The Matt Damon-starrer marks a number of firsts for Payne, the Oscar-winning filmmaker behind such great pics as Election, Citizen Ruth, About Schmidt, Sideways, The Descendants and Nebraska. Not only has he never had a movie at Venice, he's never even been to the Lido event. As for any pressure of opening the fest, which has become a key launch pad for awards-season contenders…
See full article at Deadline Movie News »

First look image from Alexander Payne’s new film Downsizing

Entertainment Weekly has debuted the first image from director Alexander Payne’s upcoming sci-fi comedy drama Downsizing featuring Matt Damon and Kristen Wiig; take a look below…

Downsizing imagines what might happen if overpopulation and climate change [prompt] Norwegian scientists to discover how to shrink people down to five inches tall and propose, very earnestly, the population’s two-to-three-hundred-year transition from big to small,” states Payne, whose credits include Election, About Schmidt, Sideways, The Descendants and Nebraska.

Downsizing is set for release on December 22nd and features a cast that includes Matt Damon, Kristen Wiig, Christoph Waltz, Laura Dern, Alec Baldwin, Neil Patrick Harris, Maribeth Monroe and Jason Sudeikis.
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

The Opening Night Selection for the 2017 New York Film Festival is Richard Linklater’s “Last Flag Flying”

Believe it or not, we’re already at the point in the year where fall film festival announcements are being made. Yesterday afternoon, the first shot across the bow was fired when the New York Film Festival announced Richard Linklater’s Last Flag Flying as it’s Opening Night Selection. Getting a bit of a head start on things, Nyff is planting a flag, no pun intended, on this flick as an awards vehicle. Linklater nearly took home an Oscar for Boyhood, so he’s certainly due. Could this do it for him? Time will tell, but getting this prestigious slot at Nyff is a strong first step. There’s plenty of reason to be excited for this one. This film is a road trip tale, working as a sort of pseudo sequel to the classic The Last Detail. In the press release, Film Society described it thusly: “In Richard Linklater’s lyrical road movie,
See full article at Hollywoodnews.com »
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