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The Widow's Wiles (1913)

John Scott and Henry Carlton are old cronies, and it is their delight that young Jack Scott and Mamie Carlton are to be married some day. The Widow Bruce comes to town and both Scott and ... See full summary »

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Cast

Cast overview:
... The Widow Bruce
... Jack Scott
... Mamie Carlton
... John Scott - Jack's Father
... Henry Carlton - Mamie's Father
Ben Walker ... The Widow's Successful Suitor
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Storyline

John Scott and Henry Carlton are old cronies, and it is their delight that young Jack Scott and Mamie Carlton are to be married some day. The Widow Bruce comes to town and both Scott and Carlton become infatuated. In their rivalry they forbid Jack and Mamie to marry. The widow discovers the trouble and has Jack make love to her. Carlton and Scott see and each withdraws his objection to the marriage of Mamie and Jack, thinking by this means to get rid of their younger rival. But Mamie has seen Jack's love making, too, and the widow has to square Jack there. This she does and when Scott and Carlton find out, they race for the widow's house, only to find that she has just become engaged to a younger man. Written by Moving Picture World synopsis

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Genres:

Comedy | Short

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28 July 1913 (USA)  »

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1.33 : 1
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Released as a split reel along with the comedy Rastus Among the Zulus (1913). See more »

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User Reviews

The players seem to be in good spirit for fun making
14 October 2017 | by See all my reviews

Robert Bums and Walter Stull, in this picture, play two old cronies. The former has a son (George Reehm), the latter has a daughter (Frances Ne Moyer) and the young people are engaged. The widow (Mae Hotely) comes in a stylish plush dress and two old men lose their heads over her; fall out, and try to break up the love story of the young people. It is not wholly new, but some new things are rung in, and it makes a very fair offering, because the players seem to be in good spirit for fun making and the situation gave them a good chance. The audience seemed to like it very much. Arthur Hotaling produced it from the script of Epes W. Sargent. - The Moving Picture World, August 9, 1913


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