7.5/10
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250 user 61 critic

Rabbit-Proof Fence (2002)

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In 1931, three aboriginal girls escape after being plucked from their homes to be trained as domestic staff and set off on a journey across the Outback.

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(book) (as Doris Pilkington Garimara), (screenplay)
Nominated for 1 Golden Globe. Another 23 wins & 24 nominations. See more awards »

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
... Molly Craig
... Daisy Craig Kadibill
Laura Monaghan ... Gracie Fields
... Moodoo
Ningali Lawford ... Maud - Molly's Mother
Myarn Lawford ... Molly's Grandmother
... Mavis
... Constable Riggs
... A.O. Neville
Natasha Wanganeen ... Nina, Dormitory Boss
Garry McDonald ... Mr. Neal at Moore River
... Police Inspector
Lorna Lesley ... Miss Thomas (as Lorna Leslie)
Celine O'Leary ... Miss Jessop
Kate Roberts ... Matron at Moore River
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Storyline

Western Australia, 1931. Government policy includes taking half-caste children from their Aboriginal mothers and sending them a thousand miles away to what amounts to indentured servitude, "to save them from themselves." Molly, Daisy, and Grace (two sisters and a cousin who are 14, 10, and 8) arrive at their Gulag and promptly escape, under Molly's lead. For days they walk north, following a fence that keeps rabbits from settlements, eluding a native tracker and the regional constabulary. Their pursuers take orders from the government's "chief protector of Aborigines," A.O. Neville, blinded by Anglo-Christian certainty, evolutionary world view and conventional wisdom. Can the girls survive? Written by <jhailey@hotmail.com>

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Taglines:

If you were kidnapped by the government, would you walk the 1500 miles back home? See more »


Motion Picture Rating (MPAA)

Rated PG for emotional thematic material | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

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Details

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Release Date:

31 January 2003 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

Long Walk Home  »

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Box Office

Budget:

$6,000,000 (estimated)

Opening Weekend USA:

$88,352, 27 November 2002, Limited Release

Gross USA:

$6,165,429, 27 April 2003
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Company Credits

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Aspect Ratio:

2.35 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

Included among the "1001 Movies You Must See Before You Die", edited by Steven Schneider. See more »

Goofs

When Moodoo is first seen riding north along the Rabbit-Proof Fence to meet a police constable he's on the west of the fence. Shortly before the actual meeting he's on the east side of the fence. See more »

Quotes

Moodoo: This girl is clever. She wants to go home.
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Crazy Credits

The painting songs sung by the Walpiri, Amatjere and Wangajunka women were not sacred songs, but were songs able to be performed in public. See more »

Connections

Featured in South Australia: ocean to outback (2003) See more »

Soundtracks

Old Folks at Home (Swanee River)
(1851) (uncredited)
Written by Stephen Foster
Sung by the children and staff at the Moore River Settlement
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User Reviews

 
The New World of the Civilised White Man
21 December 2008 | by See all my reviews

In 1931, with the Aborigine Act in Australia, the Chief Protector of Aborigines in the State of Western Australia A.O. Neville (Kenneth Branagh) had the power to relocate half-caste children from their families to educational centers to give the culture of the white man. When the fourteen year-old aboriginal girl Molly Craig (Everlyn Sampi) is taken from her mother in Jigalong with her eight year-old sister Daisy Kadibill (Tianna Sansbury) and their ten year-old cousin Gracie Fields (Laura Monaghan) to the distant Moore River Native Center, they run away trying to return to the tribe in the desert. They are chased by the skilled tracker Moodoo (David Gulpilil) and the police under the command of Neville, and have to survive to their long journey back home.

"Rabbit-Proof Fence" discloses a shameful part of the Australia contemporary history when the white man tried to force a process of eugenism, following the true saga of three escapees from one "native center" to reach their families in the desert. The story has top-notch performances of the three girls in the lead roles, supported by magnificent direction, cast and screenplay and wonderful music score of Peter Gabriel. I have never read anything about this attempt of constructing a new world of the "civilised" white man that led the Aborigine people to the destruction of their identity, family life and culture during the so-called stolen generations. My vote is eight.

Title (Brazil): "Geração Roubada" ("Stolen Generation")


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