6.4/10
357
12 user 1 critic

Laughter on the 23rd Floor (2001)

R | | Comedy | TV Movie 26 May 2001
Writing a weekly TV show for a famous comic is anything but easy.

Director:

Richard Benjamin

Writers:

Neil Simon (play), Neil Simon (teleplay)
Reviews
Nominated for 1 Primetime Emmy. Another 1 win. See more awards »

Photos

Add Image Add an image

Do you have any images for this title?

Edit

Cast

Credited cast:
Nathan Lane ... Max Prince
Mark Linn-Baker ... Val Skotsky
Saul Rubinek ... Ira Stone
Dan Castellaneta ... Milt Fields
Richard Portnow ... Harry Prince
Kristi Angus ... Darlene Drew
Ardon Bess Ardon Bess ... Cecil
Colin Fox ... Cal Weebs
Sherry Miller ... Faye
Frank Proctor Frank Proctor ... Walter Winchell
Rest of cast listed alphabetically:
Mackenzie Astin ... Lucus Brickman
Marcia Bennett ... Cal's Secretary
Robert Bidaman Robert Bidaman ... Brad
Ian D. Clark ... Doctor
Philip Craig ... Dennis
Edit

Storyline

Writing a weekly TV show for a famous comic is anything but easy.

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Taglines:

TV's top comic has everything. Except his sanity.

Genres:

Comedy

Motion Picture Rating (MPAA)

Rated R for language | See all certifications »
Edit

Details

Country:

USA | Canada

Language:

English

Release Date:

26 May 2001 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

Laughter on the 23rd Floor See more »

Company Credits

Show more on IMDbPro »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Stereo

Color:

Black and White | Color (archive footage)| Color

Aspect Ratio:

1.33 : 1
See full technical specs »
Edit

Did You Know?

Trivia

The number 23 was chosen as the floor level in the title for the source play because, according to Neil Simon, script sessions for the original 1950s Your Show of Shows (1950) were held either on the 11th or 12th floor of the NBC-TV building. Add them together and one gets 23. See more »

Goofs

Lucas' last name is Nader in the film, Brickman in the credits. See more »

Quotes

Brian: The game is funny names.
Ira: You against me? Where's the challenge? You can have all the other writers.
Carol: Why do I want children? Look what they become.
Val: All right. Let's get this over with. What's the bet?
Writers: Shoes! We're playing for shoes. They take off their shoes My seventy dollar aligators against his worn out Irish cop shoes after 5 St. Patrick's Day parades.
Val: Brian: Up the Irish Crosses Himself Ira: Screw the Pharoah Val:Aaaaaand... Go!
Brian: Rabbi John Wayne.
Writers: Eh.
Ira: The Count of Monte through Friday.
Writers: Oooh!
[...]
See more »

Connections

References A Streetcar Named Desire (1951) See more »

Frequently Asked Questions

This FAQ is empty. Add the first question.

User Reviews

What happened to the play? Elevator did not reach floor 23...
3 April 2002 | by mercutio-8See all my reviews

Neil Simon's play "Laughter on the 23rd Floor" centered on the relationship between a 1950s television comic (based on Sid Caesar and his staff of writers, who worked out of the 23rd floor of a midtown building in Manhattan. This group would talk, confide, fight, and go for each others' throats if the situation - however absurd - warranted it. Underneath the zaniness, hostility or any dilemna, however, was a shared love and talent for creating sketch comedy. And it was this talent that bonded writers and comic together and, when all smoke cleared, made them realize that they did in fact care for what they did, and for each other. Max Prince (the Sid Caesar model), and his writers. The writers and Max Prince. He needed them, they needed him. Together they needed comedy. This play was indeed a fine ensemble. Every character is defined. None are short-changed in depth. Would have been a novel approach for the film. Understandably, a film version of a stage script needs some change and adaptation so as to not be a confined, filmed play. When this transition goes so far afield, however, changing the intention and focus of the original piece, there seems to be no point in adapting it to film at all. The film "Laughter on the 23rd Floor" plays like a sequel to an original that was never made (like maybe the play?) The film focuses on Max Prince's relationships with virtually everyone (including his dead parents in a cemetary scene), EXCEPT the writers. Characters who were not even in the play become the main supporting cast, while the writers are left as incidental characters. Considering those who are playing the writers - Victor Garber, Mark Linn-Baker, Saul Rubinek, Dan Castellaneta, among others - a fine pool of talent is genuinely squandered, with nothing to do except occassionally react to and comment on the changing state of The Max Prince show. As a result, when Max makes the heartfelt statement that his writers mean everything to him, the point is lost, because there has been little interaction with them A more fitting title for this film would be "The Travels and Travails of Max Prince". Why this instead of "Laughter on the 23rd Floor"? Because Max hardly spends any TIME on the 23rd floor!


3 of 4 people found this review helpful.  Was this review helpful to you? | Report this
Review this title | See all 12 user reviews »

Contribute to This Page

IMDb Freedive: Watch Movies and TV Series for Free

Watch Hollywood hits and TV favorites for free with IMDb Freedive. Start streaming on IMDb and Fire TV devices today!

Start watching



Recently Viewed