Art for a Heart (1914)

When Dick Moore proposes to Aida Hamilton, his pretty young artist friend, she seems pleased, but tells him she can marry no one but an artist. Dick remembers that he once painted his ... See full summary »

Directors:

Wilfrid North (as Wilfred North), Wally Van

Writer:

Elaine S. Carrington (story) (as Elaine Sterne)
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Cast

Cast overview:
Wally Van ... Dick Moore
Lillian Walker ... Aida Hamilton
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Storyline

When Dick Moore proposes to Aida Hamilton, his pretty young artist friend, she seems pleased, but tells him she can marry no one but an artist. Dick remembers that he once painted his father's fence, and did it well, so, turning to Aida he says, "Why, I've painted some in my time." She is highly delighted, and tells him of a vacant studio above hers which he ought to rent at once. Dick is not over-anxious, but dares not back out, so he hires the studio, fitting it up in true artistic style. Aida shows him the announcement of a $1,000 prize for the best picture of any class shown at the National Gallery. She is going to try for it, and insists upon his doing likewise. Poor Dick, discouraged at his inability to paint, visits an exhibition to get an idea of the way it is done. He sees a crazy Futurist's daub, surrounded by an admiring crowd and immediately gets his idea. Locking himself in his studio, he throws eggs, cranberry sauce and vegetables at his canvas, adding some tobacco, ... Written by Moving Picture World synopsis

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Genres:

Short | Comedy

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Details

Country:

USA

Language:

English

Release Date:

11 March 1914 (USA) See more »

Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Sound Mix:

Silent

Aspect Ratio:

1.33 : 1
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User Reviews

The picture pleased a big audience
17 June 2018 | by deickemeyerSee all my reviews

Wallie Van and Lillian Walker make fun in this comedy. They are artists, in the same building. When Lillian follows the ordinary rules of painting she fails. Wallie, who has attended an exhibition where cubist stuff hangs, gets a "big idea." What he does in the way of "daring execution" is enough. Before he gets through with the contents of his ice-box, which he slams and splotches all over the canvas, he has a "work" which takes the thousand-dollar prize. True, the moon may hang in the middle of a hillside; celery may take the place of trees, smeared on with jam, but the result could hardly fail to take a prize in a cubist outfit. The picture pleased a big audience. - The Moving Picture World, March 28, 1914


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