7.8/10
3,499
34 user 43 critic

Eureka (2000)

Yurîka (original title)
The traumatized survivors of a murderous bus hijacking come together and take a road trip to attempt to overcome their damaged selves. Meanwhile a serial killer is on the loose.

Director:

Shinji Aoyama

Writer:

Shinji Aoyama
5 wins & 2 nominations. See more awards »

Photos

Edit

Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
Kôji Yakusho ... Makoto Sawai
Aoi Miyazaki ... Kozue Tamura
Masaru Miyazaki Masaru Miyazaki ... Naoki Tamura
Yôichirô Saitô Yôichirô Saitô ... Akihiko
Sayuri Kokushô Sayuri Kokushô ... Yumiko
Ken Mitsuishi Ken Mitsuishi ... Shigeo
Gô Rijû Gô Rijû ... Busjack Man
Yutaka Matsushige ... Matsuoka
Sansei Shiomi Sansei Shiomi ... Yoshiyuki Sawai
Kimie Shingyôji Kimie Shingyôji ... Mito Tamura
Denden ... Yoshida
Eihi Shiina ... Keiko Kôno
Yûji Nakamura Yûji Nakamura ... Hiroki Tamura
Eimei Esumi Eimei Esumi ... Seiji Sawai
Yôko Noma Yôko Noma ... Kiyoko Sawai
Edit

Storyline

The traumatized survivors of a murderous bus hijacking come together and take a road trip to attempt to overcome their damaged selves. Meanwhile a serial killer is on the loose.

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Genres:

Drama

Certificate:

See all certifications »
Edit

Did You Know?

Trivia

The main inspiration for the film was the sarin gas attack on the Tokyo underground in 1995. See more »

Quotes

Makoto Sawai: Do you think one can live only for others?
See more »

Soundtracks

Eureka
Written by Jim O'Rourke
Performed by Jim O'Rourke
See more »

User Reviews

 
Could this be the best film of 2001?
28 April 2001 | by Jaime N. ChristleySee all my reviews

Amazing film. The reviews posted - at the time of this writing - on the IMDb page are sad, because I don't think the writers were ready for what kind of movie it is. (Stephen Holden's pan in the New York Times is especially foolhardy and thoughtless.) It helped to have a little advanced word, in order to brace myself. As it stands, it should have defeated "Dancer in the Dark" at Cannes last year, handily. And if I see a better movie this year, it'll be something for the history books.

It's not for the faint of heart. It's three hours and thirty-seven minutes long, in black and white, and in Japanese. And it's very slow-moving. The cinematography is beautiful, but that may not be enough for folks to hack through nearly four hours.

But the extreme length and slowness is not unjustified. It opens with a horrifying, traumatic event that provides an emotional undercurrent that informs the remainder of the story, in much the same way as "Saving Private Ryan" did (let that not discourage the anti-Spielbergers), and as the film progresses, the event becomes a memory, part of the characters' and ours, too. And the slowness isn't really slowness - it's the playing out of events and interactions as they would happen in real time (the story spans a few months, I believe, perhaps even a year, and maybe more).

"What's the freaking story?" I hear you ask...well, here goes. The opening sequence, which will undoubtedly inspire comparisons and contrasts to "The Sweet Hereafter" (as will the entire film), shows the hijacking of a commuter bus by a businessman pushed over the edge. As the scene unfolds, he has already killed a few passengers, the police are surrounding the bus, and he has used newspapers to block all the windows.

Without revealing too much, the bus driver and two teens - a brother and a sister - survive the incident. The driver (Koji Yakusho, star of "Shall We Dance?" and "The Eel") is shaken deeply, and leaves his brother and parents to wander. The youths' mother runs off with another man, and their father dies soon after in an auto accident - with insurance payments, they can live, but there is no one to watch over them.

I could go into more of the plot - and most critics will, I'm sure - but that isn't really necessary. The key to the movie is that the events seem to be played out as they would in real life, and that the movie camera just "happens to be there" to catch them and tell the story. Sure, this is the goal of all narrative films, but with "Eureka," the process seems to have been reinvented and renewed. The film is longer than most, but not a moment is wasted; it's one of the most efficiently edited movies I've ever seen. Every shot, nuance, glance, spoken word, everything has a reason for being.

There are some who say the movie is too somber, too gloomy. It isn't really. It's somber, sure, but it doesn't strain for it. There is humor - deadpan, mostly - and great joy, too. And if you love great cinema, there is even greater joy!


39 of 48 people found this review helpful.  Was this review helpful to you? | Report this
Review this title | See all 34 user reviews »

Frequently Asked Questions

This FAQ is empty. Add the first question.
Edit

Details

Country:

Japan | France

Language:

Japanese

Release Date:

29 November 2000 (France) See more »

Also Known As:

Eureka See more »

Edit

Box Office

Gross USA:

$49,388

Cumulative Worldwide Gross:

$49,388
See more on IMDbPro »

Company Credits

Show more on IMDbPro »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

DTS

Aspect Ratio:

2.35 : 1
See full technical specs »

Contribute to This Page



Recently Viewed