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Brotherhood of the Wolf (2001)

Le pacte des loups (original title)
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1:40 | Trailer

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In 18th century France, the Chevalier de Fronsac and his native American friend Mani are sent by the King to the Gevaudan province to investigate the killings of hundreds by a mysterious beast.

Director:

Christophe Gans

Writers:

Stéphane Cabel (original scenario), Stéphane Cabel (adaptation) | 1 more credit »
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1,481 ( 2,093)
4 wins & 22 nominations. See more awards »

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
Samuel Le Bihan ... Grégoire de Fronsac
Mark Dacascos ... Mani
Jérémie Renier ... Thomas d'Apcher (as Jérémie Rénier)
Vincent Cassel ... Jean-François
Émilie Dequenne ... Marianne
Jacques Perrin ... Thomas d'Apcher (old)
Christian Marc Christian Marc ... Serviteur Thomas Agé
Karin Kriström Karin Kriström ... Bergère du Rocher
Philippe Nahon ... Jean Chastel
Virginie Darmon Virginie Darmon ... La Bavarde
Vincent Cespedes Vincent Cespedes ... Soldat
Hans Meyer ... Marquis d'Apcher
Jean-Paul Farré Jean-Paul Farré ... Père Georges
Pierre Lavit Pierre Lavit ... Jacques
Eric Prat Eric Prat ... Capitaine Duhamel (as Éric Prat)
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Storyline

In 1764 something was stalking the mountains of central France. A 'beast' that pounced on humans and animals with terrible ferocity. Indeed they beast became so notorious that the King of France dispatched envoys to find out what was happening and to kill the creature. By the end, the Beast of Gevaudan had killed over 100 people.To this day, no one is entirely sure what it was, a wolf? a hyena? or something supernatural? The Beast is a popular myth in France, albeit one rooted firmly in reality; somewhat surprisingly it is little known to the outside world, and perhaps incredibly it has never been made into a movie. Until now. Based on the true story of the Beast of the Gevaudan that terrorized France in the eighteenth century, the movie aims to tell first and explain afterwards. In the first part, a special envoy of the King of France, altogether biologist, explorer and philosopher, arrives in the Gevaudan region, in the mountainous central part of France. The Beast has been ... Written by Anonymous

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Taglines:

The year is 1766... The hunt for a killer has begun


Motion Picture Rating (MPAA)

Rated R for strong violence and gore, and sexuality/nudity | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

View content advisory »
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Details

Official Sites:

Universal [United States]

Country:

France

Language:

French | German | Italian

Release Date:

1 February 2002 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

Brotherhood of the Wolf See more »

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Box Office

Budget:

€30,000,000 (estimated)

Opening Weekend USA:

$475,181, 13 January 2002, Limited Release

Gross USA:

$11,260,096

Cumulative Worldwide Gross:

$70,752,904
See more on IMDbPro »

Company Credits

Production Co:

Canal+, Davis-Films, Eskwad See more »
Show more on IMDbPro »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

| (director's cut)

Sound Mix:

DTS | Dolby Digital

Color:

Color

Aspect Ratio:

2.35 : 1
See full technical specs »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

De Fronsac travels on a ship aptly named "Frère loup", French for "Brother wolf". See more »

Goofs

In the "final" fighting scene by the ruins, the wire that makes one of the women "fly" is visible when she lands in the leaves. See more »

Quotes

Jean-Francois de Morangias: Congratulations. If I had both my hands, I'd applaud you.
See more »

Alternate Versions

A third version of the film was released theatrically and on DVD in the UK. In this version all the scenes involving the Royal Hunter (Bauterne) are removed - his character is referred to, but never seen. This includes the removal of the following scenes:
  • The entire elaborate arrival of Bauterne is removed.
  • The scene with Bauterne in the bath telling the Chevalier that he is no longer required and then attempting to seduce an unwilling female servant.
  • The scene where Chevalier is ordered to use his skills to make an ordinary dead wolf killed by Bauterne look like the beast, and the following scenes where he does so.
  • The scenes where the fake 'beast' is presented to the Royal court and the ensuing discussion are all removed. Later DVD editions (2007 onwards) re-inserted these scenes.
See more »

Connections

References Xin du bi dao (1971) See more »

Soundtracks

Once
(uncredited)
by Felicia Sorensen
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Frequently Asked Questions

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User Reviews

No classic, but with food for thought, thrills AND Monica Bellucci naked, go for it.
22 December 2001 | by Victor FieldSee all my reviews

The presence of Robert DeNiro and Charles Grodin in "Midnight Run" seemed to cause many people to wildly overrate that standard action movie; similarly, the we-hate-Forrest-Gump crowd approached the quietly compelling "Cast Away" with too much prejudice to view it fairly. In "Brotherhood of the Wolf" (the English-language title of "Le Pacte des loups"), a character says that lies told in Latin can be seen as truth; the fact that this is a commercial film in French (with subtitles so you can fool yourself into feeling clever that you're watching an art movie) may explain why some are very, very enthusiastic about it. Not that the movie doesn't deserve praise (it does in a lot of ways); it's just that I wonder if they'd have been as impressed had it been the identical film shot in English and with an American cast (or with Americans other than Mark Dacascos).

Based on the French tale of a deadly creature that roamed the Gallic countryside in the 18th century and was never caught, "Le Pacte des loups" plays like a better, more coherent, more frightening version of "Sleepy Hollow," with the representative from the major city (Samuel le Bihan)and his Iroquois Indian blood brother (Dacascos) sent to investigate the gruesome goings-on, and gradually finding out there's far more than meets the eye - although unlike "Sleepy Hollow," which went overboard with the decapitations, the murders are kept to a minimum in the early going (we do see the beast attacking two of its female victims (the beast only attacks women and children) in the first half, but most of the details are kept to our imaginations... unlike later on in the movie). The movie takes its time setting the pace and mood, slipping in a few clues to the resolution - one hint: watch out for the gun - and risking losing the audience because it really is pretty methodical; but once all the main characters have been introduced, and once past the halfway point, the movie really starts to deliver.

Director/co-writer Christophe Gans leaves several narrative threads hanging, but barring a few plot holes this doesn't damage the movie's overall effect because so much stuff is woven into it; the tunnel vision of several of the characters, religious symbolism, conspiracy, a hint of incest between a crippled aristocratic hunter (Vincent Cassel) and his sister (Emilie Dequenne) that comes up in a crucial moment of the plot... provided you don't think it over too much afterwards (for starters, why does the beast not go after men?), or simply think on the movie's impressive visuals (the first fight scene and several thereafter are in slow motion, but when le Bihan launches an attack on the baddies towards the end - for reasons I won't divulge here - they come in regular speed; some of the CGI effects are a bit awkward, but the work of Jim Henson's Creature Shop is thankfully less like the Bloop in "Lost in Space" and more like their usual effective stuff, with a creature guaranteed to give you nightmares), it works just fine.

Mention should also be made of the fine score from Joseph LoDuca, no stranger to scoring uncharacteristically zesty historical stories after Hercules and Xena - his cue for our heroes going hunting and the final scene are standouts, although I could have lived without that song over the credits (sung in English, by the way); of the cast's acting, with special nods to Cassel, Dacascos, and Monica Bellucci as the prostitute who turns out to be more involved with the plot than it appears (if only American actors (and while we're at it, British ones) were as multilingual as their Continental counterparts); and of the brutal but effective fight scenes, with a particularly impressive climax. While this isn't the all-timer some say it is (that first hour IS a problem), I enjoyed it in the end; despite its reputation, French cinema has always had its accessible offerings (let's not forget it gave us "Diva," Brigitte Bardot, "La Cage aux Folles" and Luc Besson, "The Fifth Element" notwithstanding), and this is further proof.

As for Monica Bellucci naked - definitely one of the most memorable (and unlike the other ones, decidedly pleasant) moments in the movie, with Gans throwing in an amazing dissolve from Miss Bellucci's topography to that of the French mountains. For once, Jim Henson's Creature Shop doesn't contribute the most impressive bodywork to a film.


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