A concert film featuring four major African American stand up comedians.

Director:

Spike Lee
3 nominations. See more awards »

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Cast

Complete credited cast:
Steve Harvey ... Self
D.L. Hughley ... Self
Cedric the Entertainer ... Self
Bernie Mac ... Self
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Storyline

February 26 and 27, 2000, the Original Kings of Comedy play Charlotte, NC. The themes are Blacks and Whites, men and women, old-school and hip-hop. Steve Harvey emcees, celebrates '70s music and lyrics of love, and pokes at folks in the front row. D.L. Hughley mines racial differences and talks about his marriage. Cedric the Entertainer riffs on a Black president and on being grown up. Bernie Mac, who says he expresses what's in the back of our minds, closes with reflections on being 42 (new aspects to his sex life and his attitude toward children). Spike Lee's camera takes us backstage and off-stage with the Kings and into the crowd where everyone's laughing. Written by <jhailey@hotmail.com>

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Taglines:

We Got Jokes. See more »


Motion Picture Rating (MPAA)

Rated R for language and sex related humor | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

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Did You Know?

Trivia

Spike Lee shot the film on digital video over two nights. See more »

Quotes

Bernie Mac: When you're listening to one of our conversations you might here the word MOTHER FUCKER about 32 times. Don't be afraid of the word MOTHER FUCKER... Imma break it down to ya... If you're out there this afternoon and you see like 3 or 4 brothers talkin', you might hear a conversation and it goes like this: You seen that MOTHER FUCKIN' Bobby? That MOTHER FUCKER owes me 35 MOTHER FUCKEN dollars! He told me he gone pay my MOTHER FUCKEN money last MOTHER FUCKEN week. I aint seen this MOTHER FUCKER ...
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Connections

References Moesha (1996) See more »

Soundtracks

I Want to be Free
Written by Billy Beck (as Willy Beck), Marshall E. Jones (as Marshall Jones), Ralph Middlebrooks, Clarence Satchell, James 'Diamond' Williams (as James Williams), Leroy 'Sugarfoot' Bonner (as Leroy Bonner)and Marvin Pierce
Performed by Ohio Players
Courtesy of Mercury Records under license from Universal Music Enterprises.
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User Reviews

great fun!
19 August 2002 | by Skeletors_HoodSee all my reviews

This was a great stand-up movie, and it's wonderful that stand-up is coming back in this form. I have been exposed to stand-up ever since I was a little kid, and I have seen the evolution of stand go from 90 min concert movies like this one, down to 1 hour specials, and even down to 30 min specials as well. And The Kings bring back a variety show for us in the movie format, and the result is a masterpiece.

For those of you who only saw racism in the jokes, then you really weren't paying attention to what was being said, and knowing the attention span of the average American, that's not hard to believe. Did anyone notice that the WHITE people in the audience were laughing just as hard as the black? I think that it's because most of us white folks can take a joke, and understand that the comic is really playing around, without doing a "my god, that's a racist remark" defense that many people here seem to be doing. What these men were doing with comparing black and white is NO DIFFERENT than when Jeff Foxworthy compares and contrasts rednecks and sophisticated people.

Now, the fact that the comics were using stereotypes...hmmm. How do I say this? Folks, I have collected comedians for years, and my collection spans from CD's, DVD and VHS tapes. I have comedians that few people have heard of. My collection spans over both genders, different nationalities and ethnic groups, and I must say that every comedian needs to joke about something that the audience can and will understand, and stereotypes are the key thing to do just that, because everyone understands stereotypes. And besides, some comedians will even take a common stereotype and make it their act...Tim Allen used the stereotype of the man's man; Roseanne Barr used the disgruntled housewife, and Jeff Foxworthy used the redneck angle. Now, a comedian can go without stereotypes, but he/she runs the risk of losing the audience. And besides, it's not the stereotype that makes the joke, it's the exaggeration behind the joke.

And as far as the comedians in the movie here, they really strive for a good show. Steve Harvey did great jokes, and even did things, that while not really funny, were great entertainment, like when he was playing samples of different songs for the audience. Hughley was funny as well, especially when he was interacting with the audience. The other two comics I have never sen before, but I have no complaints, as they round out the show nicely. Each comic owned the stage when they were on it, and they would be hard to top. And folks, I like Chris Rock, but he wasn't as funny as these guys are, simply because he tries waaay too hard, and these guys are just here having fun.

A great performance by some great comics, and I would recommend this to anyone. A+++++


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Details

Official Sites:

Paramount Pictures

Country:

USA

Language:

English

Release Date:

18 August 2000 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

Kings of Comedy See more »

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Box Office

Budget:

$13,000,000 (estimated)

Opening Weekend USA:

$11,053,832, 20 August 2000

Gross USA:

$38,182,790

Cumulative Worldwide Gross:

$38,182,790
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Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Dolby Digital

Color:

Color

Aspect Ratio:

1.85 : 1
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