8.6/10
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15 user 1 critic

I'll Get You! 

Nu, pogodi! (original title)
A long-years odyssey of Wolf to catch Hare. Comprehensive changes in the Soviet Union pass in the background.
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1  
2017   2012   2006   2005   1994   1993   … See all »

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Cast

Series cast summary:
Anatoliy Papanov ...  Wolf 17 episodes, 1969-1994
Klara Rumyanova ...  Hare 17 episodes, 1969-1994
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Storyline

"Well, wait!" - Soviet and Russian animated series. The story of this animation began in 1969. Directed by Gennady Sokolskiy was filmed "zero" series for the cartoon "Merry Carousel", the main idea of which formed the basis of the famous animated series "Well, wait!". The basis of the animation is that the wolf chases the hare in the hope of eating it, but for various reasons he can not do it. As a result, the hare is always the winner, and the wolf at the end of each series says or shouts: "Well, Hare, wait!." Written by Peter-Patrick76 (peter-patrick@mail.com)

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Did You Know?

Trivia

The female Fox singer in Episode 15 is based upon Alla Pugacheva. The Hare's subsequent performance in the drag is a parody of one of her songs popular at the time. See more »

Connections

Referenced in Po hlave: Svédská trojka (2020) See more »

User Reviews

"Hare, just you wait!"
3 June 2007 | by ackstasisSee all my reviews

Probably inspired by the American "Tom and Jerry" and "Roadrunner and Wile E. Coyote" cartoons, the Russian animated series "Nu, pogodi!" features the smoking, beer-gutted, rebellious Volk (wolf) and his futile attempts to capture and eat the innocent young Zayats (hare). The first cartoon of the series was released in 1969, the second in 1970 and the series continued for sixteen episodes until the death of Anatoli Papanov, the voice of the wolf, in 1987. In 1993, two more episodes were produced featuring archived samples of Papanov's voice.

Though the cartoons are in Russian, dialogue within the films is scarce, rarely stretching beyond the wolf's trademark "Nu, zayats, nu pogodi! / Hare, just you wait!", which he utters every time his plans fail, and which you'll pick up on very quickly. Each ten-minute episode takes place in a different setting, and the wolf attempts to utilise the current situation to capture the hare (voiced by Klara Rumyanova) and presumably make a good meal out of her. Alas, these attempts are almost always in vain, with the hare constantly outsmarting the desperate wolf, either deliberately or inadvertently. Just like in your typical 'Roadrunner' cartoon, our sympathies are split between the characters – we certainly don't want the young innocent hare to be devoured, but we do feel sorry for the wolf as his endeavors fail miserably time after time.

I'm yet to see all the episodes in the series (I've really just started, in fact), but I'm enjoying it immensely, and each adventure brings forth something different and exciting. Somewhat uniquely, 'Nu, pogodi!' often sets its story to the tune of popular pop hits from the era in which it was made, so approximate dates of release can be pinpointed for any given episode based purely on the music selection. I also uncovered an interesting piece of trivia about the series. Initially, Russian singer/actor Vladimir Vysotsky was cast as the voice of the wolf, but Soviet cinema authorities did not give the studio their approval to use him, as he was not popular amongst the Communist party elite. As we know, Anatoli Papanov went on to become the voice of the wolf, though the cartoon's producers possibly included a slight tribute to Vysotsky by playing a sample of his well-known "Song about a Friend" ("Pesnya o Druge" in Russian) at the very beginning of the first episode.


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Details

Official Sites:

Official site [Russia]

Country:

Soviet Union

Language:

Russian

Release Date:

6 May 1969 (Soviet Union) See more »

Also Known As:

Well, Just You Wait! See more »

Company Credits

Show more on IMDbPro »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Mono

Color:

Color

Aspect Ratio:

1.33 : 1
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