7.8/10
5,662
63 user 56 critic

One Day in September (1999)

The Palestinian terrorist group Black September holds Israeli athletes hostage at the 1972 Summer Olympic Games in Munich.

Director:

Kevin Macdonald
Won 1 Oscar. Another 4 wins & 7 nominations. See more awards »

Photos

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
Michael Douglas ... Self - Narrator (voice)
Ankie Spitzer Ankie Spitzer ... Self
Jamal Al Gashey Jamal Al Gashey ... Self
Gerald Seymour Gerald Seymour ... Self
Axel Springer Axel Springer ... Self
Gad Zahari Gad Zahari ... Self
Shmuel Lalkin Shmuel Lalkin ... Self
Manfred Schreiber Manfred Schreiber ... Self
Walter Troger Walter Troger ... Self
Ulrich K. Wegener Ulrich K. Wegener ... Self
Hans-Dietrich Genscher Hans-Dietrich Genscher ... Self
Schlomit Romajo Schlomit Romajo ... Self
Magdi Gahary Magdi Gahary ... Self
Zvi Zamir Zvi Zamir ... Self
Dan Shilon Dan Shilon ... Self (as Dan Shillon)
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Storyline

The 1972 Munich Olympics were interrupted by Palestinian terrorists taking Israeli athletes hostage. Besides footage taken at the time, we see interviews with the surviving terrorist, Jamal Al Gashey, and various officials detailing exactly how the police, lacking an anti-terrorist squad and turning down help from the Israelis, botched the operation. Written by Jon Reeves <jreeves@imdb.com>

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis


Motion Picture Rating (MPAA)

Rated R for some graphic violent images | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

View content advisory »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

Director Kevin MacDonald finally managed to persuade the surviving terrorist Jamal Al Gashey to talk on camera after eight months of fitful negotiation and numerous aborted meetings in secret locations. Al Gashey specified certain conditions prior to their actual meeting in an Arab country insisting MacDonald was to travel alone, not to inform anybody where he was going and provide a wig and moustache for Al Gashey to disguise himself when in front of the camera. The interview piece used in the documentary was filmed by somebody Al Gashey trusted. See more »

Quotes

Ulrich K. Wegener: Then there was silence. And I told the minister..."I think I have to go to look for what the police is doing. "And then I went to the captainof the police company there... and said, "Are you going to do something? You have to move your people there.You pull out the hostages or whatever, you know... and do something. "They didn't do anything. "I have no orders," he said. It was... It was a really tragic story... and so we could only look, you know. And when after... You could hear them yelling, ...
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Alternate Versions

Israeli version narrated by Rafi Ginat, and includes updated information regarding the claims of the families against the German authorities in the subtitles at the end of the film. See more »

Connections

Referenced in The 50 Greatest Documentaries (2005) See more »

Soundtracks

It's Not Too Beautiful
Performed by The Beta Band
Copyright 1999 Regal Records Ltd.
Licensed courtesy of EMI Records Limited
Written by Stephen Mason/Richard Greentree/John Maclean/Robin Jones/John Barry
Published by EMI Music Publishing Ltd.
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User Reviews

 
A Fine Documentary
22 May 2004 | by canadudeSee all my reviews

"One Day in September" is a phenomenal documentary. Its focus is on the hostage situation during the 1972 Munich Olympics when Palestinian terrorists took Israeli athletes prisoner. The film does something which I think any great documentary should when it covers or explores historical events. It frames the entire hostage crisis in a larger context. Yes, the film covers 21 hours of September 5th on which the hostage situation commenced and (one could say) resolved itself. However, in order to understand the reactions of the German government, the Israeli government, the media and the Olympic Games' fans and participants, the film discusses the German desire to create the atmosphere of peace to erase the stigma of the 1936 Olympics, then full of Fascist propaganda. It touches on the ongoing Israel-Arab conflict. It touches on the meaning of the Olympics.

"One Day in September" never strays from its focus, however, which is to document the hostage crisis and what it meant. What makes the film great, aside from its intelligent approach to the subject, is how well the atmosphere of the hostage situation is carried across. By the end of the film you do feel like you've watched the news for a day, glued to the TV screen hoping that the people will make it out alive. Watching it, you are reminded of how ill-prepared states are for terrorist attacks (still rings true even recently) because of the ulterior motives of statesmen. A lot of what happens at the state, political level, happens because it has to look good. The Germans were unprepared for the terrorists because they thought that extreme police security would welcome images of pre-War Olympics in Germany. They wanted to appear a certain way. The same went for how they handled the crisis.

The film, like many terrorist crises, ends with a tragedy. What remains with the viewer is not only the deep sadness at how one of the most peaceful world events turns into one of the most hateful, but also how incredibly contemporary those events from over thirty years ago still seem.


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Details

Official Sites:

Sony Pictures Classics

Country:

Switzerland | Germany | UK

Language:

English | German

Release Date:

12 July 2001 (Germany) See more »

Also Known As:

One Day in September See more »

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Box Office

Opening Weekend USA:

$15,149, 19 November 2000

Gross USA:

$156,818

Cumulative Worldwide Gross:

$156,818
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Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Stereo

Aspect Ratio:

1.85 : 1
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