7.8/10
5,597
62 user 56 critic

One Day in September (1999)

The Palestinian terrorist group Black September holds Israeli athletes hostage at the 1972 Summer Olympic Games in Munich.

Director:

Kevin Macdonald
Won 1 Oscar. Another 4 wins & 7 nominations. See more awards »

Photos

Edit

Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
Michael Douglas ... Self - Narrator (voice)
Ankie Spitzer Ankie Spitzer ... Self
Jamal Al Gashey Jamal Al Gashey ... Self
Gerald Seymour Gerald Seymour ... Self
Axel Springer Axel Springer ... Self
Gad Zahari Gad Zahari ... Self
Shmuel Lalkin Shmuel Lalkin ... Self
Manfred Schreiber Manfred Schreiber ... Self
Walter Troger Walter Troger ... Self
Ulrich K. Wegener Ulrich K. Wegener ... Self
Hans-Dietrich Genscher Hans-Dietrich Genscher ... Self
Schlomit Romajo Schlomit Romajo ... Self
Magdi Gahary Magdi Gahary ... Self
Zvi Zamir Zvi Zamir ... Self
Dan Shilon Dan Shilon ... Self (as Dan Shillon)
Edit

Storyline

The 1972 Munich Olympics were interrupted by Palestinian terrorists taking Israeli athletes hostage. Besides footage taken at the time, we see interviews with the surviving terrorist, Jamal Al Gashey, and various officials detailing exactly how the police, lacking an anti-terrorist squad and turning down help from the Israelis, botched the operation. Written by Jon Reeves <jreeves@imdb.com>

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis


Motion Picture Rating (MPAA)

Rated R for some graphic violent images | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

View content advisory »
Edit

Did You Know?

Trivia

When One Day in September (2000) premiered at the Telluride Film Festival, Eric Bana was in attendance with his film Chopper (2000). Bana had seen One Day in September (2000) and read books on the subject. He would later go on to portray the lead role of Avner in Munich (2005) a film about the Israeli response to the 1972 Munich Olympics. See more »

Quotes

Walter Troger: I didn't like Issa of course because of what he was doing but I could have liked him when I met him elsewhere. He was not violent, I would have even trusted him in his word, not his compatriots and his partners. They were, like, what we say in German, Galgenvogel, gallows birds. But Issa was different from them.
See more »

Alternate Versions

Israeli version narrated by Rafi Ginat, and includes updated information regarding the claims of the families against the German authorities in the subtitles at the end of the film. See more »

Connections

Referenced in The 50 Greatest Documentaries (2005) See more »

Soundtracks

Reting's Eyes
Performed & composed by Philip Glass
Courtesy of Disney
Published by Cambell Connelly & Co. Ltd.
See more »

User Reviews

Don't watch this just before bedtime!
17 January 2002 | by claudecatSee all my reviews

Watching this documentary is a harrowing experience. I think the DVD version is unique in that even its menu page looks terrifying. By the end of the film, however, I was more angry than scared, because of the amazing level of incompetence German and Olympic officials showed in handling the hostage situation. The media also behaved abominably, broadcasting play-by-play accounts of the police's plans right into the ears of the terrorists. It made me think that the Bush administration might be partially correct in keeping the media in the dark about American military activities in Afghanistan.

I don't understand why some people felt the film didn't give the "context" of the kidnapping. I think Jamal al Gashey, the only kidnapper left alive now, explained quite clearly why he did what he did. But if the film had spent an extra hour discussing the Israeli-Palestinian conflict, would that have made a difference? In my mind, nothing justified the kidnapping of athletes who by their very presence at the Olympics were trying to further world understanding. I can't think of many things that do justify holding innocent hostages for ransom. The director seems to feel that way too. Apparently that makes the movie too biased for some viewers.

As for the comment that the movie "demonizes" the kidnappers, I don't agree. The filmmakers include a German official's statement that, if he had met him in a different situation, he would have liked the terrorist spokesman, Issa. al Gashey tells some very human stories, such as an ironic account of getting into the Olympic village with the help of American athletes out after curfew, and he insists that the plan was never to murder the Israelis. And al Gashey's brief but affecting account of being exiled from his childhood village does a lot more to argue the Palestinian side of the conflict than any brutal hostage-taking scheme. Too bad he never has realized that.

Interestingly, filmmaker Kevin MacDonald wrote that in Israel he has been accused of giving too much time to the Palestinians. He also notes that Simon Reeve wrote a companion book to the movie, because "there were many aspects of the story we could not include in a 90-minute film." It's a pity the existence of the book isn't publicized more (assuming it's any good).

I do wish the film had spent more time discussing the aftermath of the tragedy, and that MacDonald had used his incredible opportunity of interviewing the last remaining terrorist to ask him some more hard-hitting questions, instead of being satisfied with a step-by-step account of what the kidnappers did that day. (However, I just read that it was extremely difficult for MacDonald to get al Gashey to talk at all.

I wasn't completely convinced that the Germans colluded with the terrorists in the Lufthansa hijacking, and would have liked to see evidence for that. I would also have liked to learn more about the Black September group. Basically, I think the film should have been longer. If it was kept to its current length for some marketing reason, I think the sponsoring studio should rethink that rule.

However, the only choice I really wish the filmmaker had not made was to accompany extremely gruesome shots of bodies with loud psychedelic music. It would have been more respectful to show the images in silence.

Watching the film in light of the events of a day in September of 2001, and after, makes me think that the world hasn't come very far since 1972, in terms of solving the Middle East's problems.


33 of 40 people found this review helpful.  Was this review helpful to you? | Report this
Review this title | See all 62 user reviews »

Frequently Asked Questions

This FAQ is empty. Add the first question.
Edit

Details

Official Sites:

Sony Pictures Classics

Country:

Switzerland | Germany | UK

Language:

English | German

Release Date:

12 July 2001 (Germany) See more »

Also Known As:

En dag i september See more »

Edit

Box Office

Opening Weekend USA:

$15,149, 19 November 2000

Gross USA:

$156,818

Cumulative Worldwide Gross:

$156,818
See more on IMDbPro »

Company Credits

Show more on IMDbPro »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Stereo

Aspect Ratio:

1.85 : 1
See full technical specs »

Contribute to This Page

We've Got Your Streaming Picks Covered

Looking for some great streaming picks? Check out some of the IMDb editors' favorites movies and shows to round out your Watchlist.

Visit our What to Watch page



Recently Viewed