6.8/10
121,541
477 user 129 critic

The Score (2001)

An aging thief hopes to retire and live off his ill-gotten wealth when a young kid convinces him into doing one last heist.

Director:

Frank Oz

Writers:

Daniel E. Taylor (story), Kario Salem (story) | 3 more credits »
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Popularity
2,674 ( 130)
1 win & 1 nomination. See more awards »

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
Robert De Niro ... Nick
Edward Norton ... Jack / Brian
Marlon Brando ... Max
Angela Bassett ... Diane
Gary Farmer ... Burt
Paul Soles Paul Soles ... Danny
Jamie Harrold ... Steven
Serge Houde ... Laurent
Jean-René Ouellet ... André (as Jean Rene Ouellet)
Martin Drainville ... Jean-Claude
Claude Despins ... Albert
Richard Waugh ... Sapperstein
Mark Camacho ... Sapperstein's Cousin
Marie-Josée Colburn ... Woman in Study (as Marie-Josee D'Amours)
Gavin Svensson Gavin Svensson ... Man in Study
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Storyline

Three generations of method acting giants unite for this crime thriller written by Kario Salem and directed by Frank Oz. Robert De Niro stars as Nick Wells, an aging thief whose specialty is safe-cracking and who is on the verge of retiring to a life of ease, running his jazz club and romancing his girlfriend Diane (Angela Bassett). But before he can ride off into the sunset, Nick is pressured to do one last job by his mentor and business partner, a flamboyant and extravagant upscale fence named Max (Marlon Brando). Max is plotting the heist of the Montreal Customs House, and he's got a man on the inside, Jackie Teller (Edward Norton), a talented but volatile crook who has managed to ingratiate himself with the facility's staff as a fellow employee suffering from cerebral palsy. Jackie bristles at Nick's interference in "his" score, however, and threatens violence when it seems he's going to be cut out of the action. In the meantime, Nick grows increasingly ill at ease about the ...

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Taglines:

There are no partners in crime


Motion Picture Rating (MPAA)

Rated R for language | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

View content advisory »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

Director Frank Oz loved Howard Shore's music for the film but also felt that he needed enough silence to build up the mood of the story without overdoing it musically. Oz said "Howard Shore did a terrific job. He got the tone of the film just right". See more »

Goofs

When Max writes the location for Nick to exchange the scepter for the money, he doesn't give it to Nick. As Nick leaves, his hands are empty and we didn't see him put it in his pocket. A long shot of Max shows that the paper is no where in sight. See more »

Quotes

Nick Wells: After this no more jobs. This is the last one I'm doing. I'm quitting for good.
Max: Yeah? How many times have you told me that in twenty-fie years. I mean, I'm gonna believe that when the pigs eat my brother, right?
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Soundtracks

I'll Make It Up As I Go
Words and Music by David Foster and Amy Foster-Gillies (as Amy Gillies)
Performed by Diana Krall
Courtesy of The Verve Music Group
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User Reviews

 
Considering the cast, it's all a bit underwhelming...
30 August 2014 | by MartinHaferSee all my reviews

There really is nothing wrong with "The Score", though, for that matter, there really isn't a lot right about it either. Considering that the film is Marlon Brando's last and it also stars Robert De Niro and Edward Norton, I would have expected some magic. Instead, it's a mildly entertaining heist film. It also has a performance by Norton that is bound to offend many.

Nick Wells (De Niro) is an aging thief who wants one final score before he gets out of the business. His bizarre buddy, Max (Brando) contacts him about a great heist--a jewel-encrusted golden scepter. However, Nick will have to have a cocky (and annoying)young partner, Jack (Norton)--and Nick is obviously not happy working with the guy.

As for Jack, he's a guy who thinks long term. He took his present job some time back in order to infiltrate the place. And, since being hired, he has behaved as if he has cerebral palsy in order to convince everyone he's harmless. Little do his co-workers know that it's all a brilliant (and politically incorrect) disguise.

To me, the film never piqued my interest and never made my pulse change a single tick. Some of this might have been due to Brando's weak performance, a bit of irritation about Norton behaving as if he's mentally challenged and a very ordinary plot. All I know is that I didn't hate it nor did I like it.


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Frequently Asked Questions

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Details

Country:

Germany | Canada | USA

Language:

English | French

Release Date:

13 July 2001 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

The Score See more »

Filming Locations:

Kahnawake, Québec, Canada See more »

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Box Office

Budget:

$68,000,000 (estimated)

Opening Weekend USA:

$19,018,807, 15 July 2001

Gross USA:

$71,107,711

Cumulative Worldwide Gross:

$114,252,154
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Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

DTS | Dolby

Color:

Color (DeLuxe)

Aspect Ratio:

2.35 : 1
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