6.0/10
6,282
147 user 49 critic

Timecode (2000)

Trailer
0:43 | Trailer
Four frames of simultaneous action that alternately follow a smitten lesbian lover as she obsesses over her partner's dalliances and the tense goings-on of a Hollywood film production company.

Director:

Mike Figgis

Writer:

Mike Figgis (story)
2 nominations. See more awards »

Videos

Photos

Learn more

More Like This 

Timecode (2016)
Short | Drama | Romance
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 7.1/10 X  

Luna and Diego are the parking lot security guards. Diego does the night shift, and Luna works by day.

Director: Juanjo Giménez Peña
Stars: Lali Ayguadé, Pep Domenech, Vicente Gil
Drama
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 5.3/10 X  

A British car racer meets a suicidal woman while in Istanbul for the Gumball Rally.

Director: Mike Figgis
Stars: Rosey Chan, Daniel Lapaine, Sophie Winkleman
Captives (1994)
Crime | Drama | Romance
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 6.4/10 X  

A beautiful young dentist (Ormond) working in a tough British prison starts to become attracted to a violent inmate (Roth) after the break-up of her marriage, and embarks upon an illicit ... See full summary »

Director: Angela Pope
Stars: Julia Ormond, Tim Roth, Keith Allen
Biography | Drama | History
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 6.5/10 X  

Hollywood makes a deal with Mexican revolutionary Pancho Villa to film his war and recreate his life.

Director: Bruce Beresford
Stars: Antonio Banderas, Eion Bailey, Alan Arkin
Hotel (2001)
Comedy
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 4.1/10 X  

A prostitute, a hired killer, and a movie crew cross paths in a Venice hotel where human meat is on the menu in this freewheeling film.

Director: Mike Figgis
Stars: Max Beesley, Saffron Burrows, Rhys Ifans
Thriller
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 4.2/10 X  

Martin is a successful writer whose wife suddenly disappeared. During a film shoot fifteen years later, Martin meets Angelique, who disappears the same night. The next day, police find her dead body and a mysterious investigation begins.

Director: Mike Figgis
Stars: Sebastian Koch, Lotte Verbeek, Emilia Fox
Co/Ma (2004)
Documentary
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 5.2/10 X  

19 filmmakers from ten european countries selected by Mike Figgis for a Masterclass by the European Film Academy come to Slovenia in a challenging mission: to conceive, shoot, complete a ... See full summary »

Directors: Jovan Arsenic, Mike Figgis, and 3 more credits »
Stars: Aleksandra Balmazovic, Aljosa Kovacic, Thekla Reuten
Stormy Monday (1988)
Crime | Drama | Music
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 6.2/10 X  

A crooked American businessman tries to push the shady influential owner of a nightclub in Newcastle, England to sell him the club. The club's new employee and the American's ex lover fall in love and inadvertently stir the pot.

Director: Mike Figgis
Stars: Melanie Griffith, Tommy Lee Jones, Sting
Musical
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 7.6/10 X  

A cinematographic adaptation of the dance performance by Ann Van den Broek.

Director: Mike Figgis
Stars: Sura Dohnke, Frauke Marien, Cecilia Moisio
Class Action (1991)
Drama | Thriller
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 6.4/10 X  

An attorney representing a traumatized accident victim finds that his opponent is a very familiar defense attorney - his own daughter.

Director: Michael Apted
Stars: Gene Hackman, Mary Elizabeth Mastrantonio, Colin Friels
Miss Julie (1999)
Drama
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 6.2/10 X  

A footman seduces a count's daughter.

Director: Mike Figgis
Stars: Saffron Burrows, Peter Mullan, Maria Doyle Kennedy
Documentary
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 7.5/10 X  
Director: Mike Figgis
Stars: Sara Baras, Elena Camunez Andújar, Eva Yerbabuena
Edit

Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
Xander Berkeley ... Evan Wantz
Golden Brooks ... Onyx Richardson
Saffron Burrows ... Emma
Viveka Davis ... Victoria Cohen
Richard Edson ... Lester Moore
Aimee Graham ... Sikh Nurse
Salma Hayek ... Rose
Glenne Headly ... Therapist
Andrew Heckler ... Auditioning Actor
Holly Hunter ... Renee Fishbine
Danny Huston ... Randy
Daphna Kastner Daphna Kastner ... Auditioning Actor
Patrick Kearney Patrick Kearney ... Drug House Owner
Elizabeth Low Elizabeth Low ... Penny - Evan's Assistant
Kyle MacLachlan ... Bunny Drysdale
Edit

Storyline

The primary story with this movie is that it is shown in four simultaneously filmed ninety-three minute single shot takes (in other words, shown in four quadrants), with the actual plot secondary. The four cameras follow the players involved, with two or more of the four cameras sometimes filming the exact same scene from different angles and thus different perspectives. The audio on each of the four quadrants is turned up and down based on which quadrant(s) the viewer should pay most attention to at any given time. The actual plot, which takes place in Hollywood, involves the pre-production by Red Mullet Productions for the movie "Bitch from Louisiana". The production team is in an executive meeting to discuss several aspects of the movie, including problems with one of their own, Alex Green, who has been missing in action from much of the production and this meeting. Alex's problems stem from his substance abuse and philandering, his wife Emma who is contemplating leaving him, of ... Written by Huggo

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Taglines:

You are looking at a movie screen split into four parts. You will see a tale of sex and power, captured by four different cameras. You will witness a story told in real time, without any edits. You will experience the first movie ever told in four dimensions. See more »

Genres:

Drama | Romance

Motion Picture Rating (MPAA)

Rated R for drug use, sexuality, language and a scene of violence | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

View content advisory »
Edit

Details

Country:

USA

Language:

English

Release Date:

28 April 2000 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

Time Code See more »

Edit

Box Office

Budget:

$5,000,000 (estimated)

Opening Weekend USA:

$93,148, 30 April 2000

Gross USA:

$1,057,750

Cumulative Worldwide Gross:

$1,431,406
See more on IMDbPro »

Company Credits

Show more on IMDbPro »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Dolby Digital | SDDS

Color:

Color

Aspect Ratio:

1.85 : 1
See full technical specs »
Edit

Did You Know?

Trivia

The film was written on music paper, exactly like a string quartet. Each bar line representing a minute. See more »

Goofs

The reflection of the cameraman's head is visible on the clock as he approaches it, focuses on the object and then pulls away from it. See more »

Quotes

Darren: Did you look at Tower Records, cause they just re-released ABBA's greatest hits.
See more »

Alternate Versions

Timecode was shot with a total of 15, 90+ minute, real-time takes. For the theatrical release the last take was used. Take 1, which runs 93 minutes, has the role of the Executive played by Holly Houston and the role of Emma's Therapist is played by Laurie Metcalf. Take 15, the one used for the theatrical version which runs 97 minutes, has the roles of the Executive taken over by Holly Hunter and the Therapist role is taken over by Glenne Headly. Both takes are included in the US DVD release. See more »

Connections

Spoofed in My Big Fat Independent Movie (2005) See more »

Soundtracks

Single
Written by Ben Watt and Tracey Thorn
Performed by Everything But The Girl
Courtesy of Atlantic Recording Corp.
By Arrangement with Warner Special Products/Virgin Records Limited
See more »

Frequently Asked Questions

This FAQ is empty. Add the first question.

User Reviews

 
A film doesn't have to be revolutionary for it to be brilliant.
2 October 2000 | by the red duchessSee all my reviews

Mike Figgis does a Robert Altman. Except, instead of creating a large narrative of interconnecting plot strands, he puts them all on four split screens. Is this therefore more subversive than Altman? I don't think so - Altman's method is an attack on Hollywood linearity, on conventional methods of 'connection'; his characters exist is the same space but are emotionally etc. miles apart. The characters in 'Short Cuts', like the city of L.A. itself, are a mass without a centre. Figgis, for all the supposed diffusion of his visual strands, actually reunites, glues together Altman's ruptures. In this way it might seem a more optimistic kind of film. It isn't.

'timecode' is being touted as a revolution in cinema, a new way of watching films. Instead of watching one screen and being led by a director, we are given four, and asked to make our choices. I was surprised at how panicked I was at this in the first 20 minutes, darting between scenes, wondering which one I should follow. This forced me out of the film much more disturbingly than anything by Fassbinder or Godard. But this alienation is deceptive. Firstly we are not really bombarded by four narratives - put 'pierrot le fou', 'diary of a country priest', 'vampyr' and 'branded to kill' on four screens, then you'd be confused. Figgis leads you all the way, gives you an illusion of choice, but rarely fulfils it. The focus is on one screen at a time - either the soundtrack is turned up loudest, the plot is more interesting, whatever. For long periods of time, you can safely ignore other scenes because there is nothing going on - for about 20 minutes, for example, Lauren sits in a limousine listening to a bug planted on Rose; this leaves us free to watch another screen and see what she's listening to. Other scenes are merely tedious - eg Emma droning to her shrink (a nod to Godard's 'week end', that famous end of cinema?) - so that you gladly look elsewhere. It is possible to listen to one scene, and flit around at the others to catch up on what's going on.

What I'm saying is, 'timecode' is not a difficult experience - after the initial adjustment, you watch the film as you would any other, especially as all the stories converge and are really only one story. Even at the beginning, the feeling is less one of Brechtian alienation than akin to being a security guard faced with a grid of screens - you rarely think about the physical processes of film or performance, as you would in a Dogme or Godard film.

So if 'timecode' is less revolutionary than it seems, that doesn't mean it isn't a brilliant film, a real purse in a pig's ear of a year (or whatever the expression is). One reason for this is the four-screen structure: I would have to watch it a few more times, but I was very conscious of the orchestration of the screens, the way compositions, or camera movements, or close-ups etc., in one screen were echoed, reflected, distorted in the others - a true understanding of this miraculous formal apparatus would, I think, give us the heart of the film, and bely the improvised nature of the content. Figgis is also a musician - he co-composed the score - and the movement here, its fugues and variations are truly virtuosic, almost worthy of my earlier Altman comparison.

But the content is great fun too. At first I was disappointed at the self-absorbed drabness of the material, the idea that we shouldn't be made to work too hard because we've enough to deal with the four screens. And, it is true, that the stories rarely transcend cliche. But, such is the enthusiasm of the performers (people like Salma Hayek obviously relishing slightly more useful roles than the bilge they're usually stuck in); the precision of the structure; the mixture of comedy and pathos, and the way the style facilitates both, that you're convinced you're watching a masterpiece. Quentin's massaging and Ana's pitch are two of the funniest things I've seen in ages, while Stellan Skarsgard's rich performance stands out all the more for its brittle surroundings.


27 of 40 people found this review helpful.  Was this review helpful to you? | Report this
Review this title | See all 147 user reviews »

Contribute to This Page

Free Movies and TV Shows You Can Watch Now

On IMDb TV, you can catch Hollywood hits and popular TV series at no cost. Select any poster below to play the movie, totally free!

Browse free movies and TV series

Stream Popular Action and Adventure Titles With Prime Video

Explore popular action and adventure titles available to stream with Prime Video.

Start your free trial



Recently Viewed