4.9/10
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373 user 128 critic

Dracula 2000 (2000)

Trailer
1:15 | Trailer
A group of thieves breaks into a chamber expecting to find paintings, but instead they release the count himself, who travels to New Orleans to find his nemesis' daughter, Mary Van Helsing.

Director:

Patrick Lussier

Writers:

Joel Soisson (story), Patrick Lussier (story) | 1 more credit »
Reviews
Popularity
2,756 ( 470)
2 nominations. See more awards »

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
Gerard Butler ... Dracula
Christopher Plummer ... Abraham Van Helsing
Jonny Lee Miller ... Simon Sheppard
Justine Waddell ... Mary Heller-Van Helsing
Vitamin C ... Lucy Westerman (as Colleen Ann Fitzpatrick)
Jennifer Esposito ... Solina
Omar Epps ... Marcus
Sean Patrick Thomas ... Trick
Danny Masterson ... Nightshade
Lochlyn Munro ... Eddie
Tig Fong ... Dax
Tony Munch ... Charlie
Jeri Ryan ... Valerie Sharpe
Shane West ... JT
Nathan Fillion ... Father David
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Storyline

In the millenium version of this classic Gothic horror we find Abraham Van Helsing (Plummer), who has tangled with Count Dracula (Butler) in the past, working as an English antiques dealer. Simon (Miller) is a vampire hunter in training under his apprenticeship. Van Helsing and Simon travel from London to New Orleans to rescue Van Helsing's daughter Mary (Waddell) from the family's life long nemesis - Dracula. Written by Sujit R. Varma

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Taglines:

19th Century Chills Terrify the 21st Century See more »


Certificate:

R | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

View content advisory »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

(at around 1h) The line in the film where Jonny Lee Miller playing Simon Sheppard says, "Never, ever fuck with an antiques dealer," was a line the actor would say on set as a joke. The director liked it and incorporated it into the scene. See more »

Goofs

(at around 1h 15 mins) Lafayette Cemetery closes at dusk (or maybe noon, reports vary); the gates are closed and locked. Yet we see the gates stand wide open very late at night. See more »

Quotes

Dracula: You made the world in your image. Now I make it in mine.
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Crazy Credits

As the credits roll, interspersed in the words, are coloured pictures of things important to the movie's premise, including a row of teeth, a bat, and a cross. These pictures are seen both on the left and right sides. See more »

Connections

Version of Tomb of Dracula (1980) See more »

Soundtracks

A Welcome Burden
Written and Performed by Disturbed
Courtesy of Giant Records
By Arrangement with Warner Special Products
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User Reviews

 
Nice hair, shame about the plot
29 March 2004 | by tjcclarkeSee all my reviews

Being a poor hen-pecked loser who isn't allowed cable television, I found myself in the rather alien position of being spoilt for choice over which movie to watch last Sunday night. British terrestrial television rarely throws up such a dilemma, so I had to consider carefully which one to select. In the corner marked 'safe option' we had Mel Gibson's Ransom (seen it; dull; can't really remember what happened but am assuming they eventually get the kid back), second was Man on the Moon (seen it; vaguely remember being a bit disappointed), and third was Wes Craven's Dracula 2000 (never seen it; presumably a straight-to-video job). Almost without hesitation I plumped for that.

A maverick choice, you might say - but there was method to my madness. On more than one occasion, drunken and deluded girls have approached me in bars and accused me of looking like Jonny Lee Miller. They are wrong of course - those close to me have taken sadistic pleasure in assuring me I look more like a cross between Woody Harrelson and Kelsey Grammar - not particularly good for my sex-symbol status, but useful if I ever wanted work as a stunt double on the set of Cheers.

Anyway, it turns out I chose wisely - Dracula 2000 is a hoot. More Schlock than horror (as you might expect from the creator of the Scream franchise) it has the kind of kitschy charm of Buffy the Vampire Slayer only with worse dialogue and a sillier plot. Those purists who prefer a more classic Peter Cushing/Christopher Lee tussle between good and evil are unlikely to stay beyond the first reel, but there are rewards for those who stick it out.

Miller plays Simon Shepherd the protégé of the mysterious Matthew Van Helsing (Christopher Plummer). A gang of thieves infiltrate Van Helsing's secret stash of old relics and unwittingly release Dracula from his silver coffin. Big mistake. The dark lord makes a bee-line for New Orleans in search Van Helsing's daughter Mary. On his way, he creates merry hell crafting a few undead henchwomen (mostly blonde) and enjoying unspeakable depravity in the middle of the Mardi Gras carnival. Unsurprisingly, Miller and Plummer pack their crucifixes and silver bullets and hurry over to save the day.

This being a sexed-up modern-day version of Bram Stoker's classic, Dracula himself is far from the urbane older gentleman with the black cloak and the widow's peak - this one is young and spunky and has the kind of barnet you might find in a L'oreal commercial. Try to imagine a bastard hybrid of David Copperfield and Alan Partridge and you won't be far off. Dracula's hair is not the only highlight though: There are some brilliantly awful modern cultural references - Sweet and innocent Mary works in Virgin Megastore (geddit?) - and an audacious religious sub-plot which goes some way towards explaining Dracula's hatred of silver.

All in all it is great fun. It was inevitably mauled by the critics, but I guess they don't have a sense of humour. Poor old Jonny's been in some turkeys since he made Trainspotting, but I'm backing him to hilt on this one - it certainly beats watching Mel Gibson and Rene Russo blubbing for two and a half hours.

7/10


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Frequently Asked Questions

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Details

Country:

USA

Language:

English

Release Date:

22 December 2000 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

Wes Craven Presents Dracula 2000 See more »

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Box Office

Budget:

$54,000,000 (estimated)

Opening Weekend USA:

$8,636,567, 25 December 2000

Gross USA:

$33,022,767

Cumulative Worldwide Gross:

$47,053,625
See more on IMDbPro »

Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

DTS | Dolby Digital | SDDS

Color:

Color

Aspect Ratio:

2.35 : 1
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