6.5/10
5,574
90 user 71 critic

The Claim (2000)

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A prospector who sold his wife and infant daughter in exchange for a mining claim, tries desperately to win them back as he helps to build the Pacific Railroad with a group of pioneer friends.

Writers:

(screenplay by), (inspired by the novel by: "The Mayor of Casterbridge")
1 win & 10 nominations. See more awards »

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
Ron Anderson ...
Stagecoach Driver
Marty Antonini ...
German
...
Randy Birch ...
Priest
...
French Sue
Bill Chesterman ...
Mr. Timpson
Artur Ciastkowski ...
Delaney
Fernando Davalos ...
Barman
...
Crocker
...
Annie
Kate Hennig ...
...
Miner No.3
Landon Hicks ...
Young Miner
Matthew Johnson ...
...
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Storyline

A prospector sells his wife and daughter to another gold miner for the rights to a gold mine. Twenty years later, the prospector is a wealthy man who owns much of the old west town named Kingdom Come. But changes are brewing and his past is coming back to haunt him. A surveyor and his crew scout the town as a location for a new railroad line and a young woman suddenly appears in the town and is evidently the man's daughter. Written by John Sacksteder <jsackste@bellsouth.net>

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Taglines:

Everything has a price.

Genres:

Drama | Romance | Western

Motion Picture Rating (MPAA)

Rated R for sexuality, and some language and violence | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

 »
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Details

Country:

| |

Language:

Release Date:

2 February 2001 (UK)  »

Also Known As:

Kingdom Come  »

Filming Locations:

 »

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Box Office

Budget:

CAD 20,000,000 (estimated)

Opening Weekend:

£38,975 (United Kingdom), 9 February 2001, Limited Release

Opening Weekend USA:

$7,131, 1 January 2001, Limited Release

Gross USA:

$669,258, 5 July 2001
See more on IMDbPro »

Company Credits

Show more on  »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

| (DVD)

Sound Mix:

Color:

Aspect Ratio:

2.35 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

The scene where Dillon ('Peter Mullan') confronts Daglish (Wes Bentley) in the bedroom of Lucia (Milla Jovovich) had to be reshot many months after principal photography was over. Bentley had cut his hair for another role, and had to be outfitted with a wig matching his hairstyle in "The Claim" at a cost of ten thousand American dollars. See more »

Goofs

Near the end of the film, Donald and Francis arrive back to town on horseback. Several men are walking behind them. Two men in Russian style hats are wearing modern day aviator sunglasses. See more »

Quotes

Vauneen: [first lines - overlapping conversations] Alright ladies, let's go. I'm Vauneen, I take care of you from this point on. Ya get down, and we're going to get you to work real soon...
Deputy: Alright gents, let's hand-up your firearms.
Donald Dalglish: Why?
Deputy: It's a town's rule.
Donald Dalglish: These firearms are the property of the Central Pacific Railroad.
Deputy: That don't matter, Mr. Dillon says no firearms in town, so no firearms in town, come on...
Donald Dalglish: You can't take these weapons...
Vauneen: I said, leave that...
Deputy: Well then you can't come into Mr. ...
[...]
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Connections

Version of The Mayor of Casterbridge (1921) See more »

Soundtracks

Se Velha
Written by Americo Durao & Antonio Menano
Published by SPA
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User Reviews

 
Worthy but inconsistent
10 February 2001 | by See all my reviews

Based loosely on Thomas Hardy's novel "Mayor of Casterbridge" this is a valiant recreation transposed from England to the cold mountains of early California. A man sells his wife and daughter for a gold-mining claim. Years later, when he is the local sheriff, his wife and daughter return. A sub-plot documents the arrival of the railroad construction. This has all the makings of a truly great movie but unfortunately is good without being great. The first half is particularly disappointing - the camera fails to linger where there are wonderful scenic shots of breathtaking beauty or dialogue that could have emotional impact. It lingers over boring, inconsequential scenes. The movie also veers stomach-churningly between episodes of gripping realism to episodes where it simply looks all too obviously like actors on a set reciting their lines. Verging on pretentiousness at times, The Claim still manages to pull through as a worthwhile film, largely because it is worth seeing for the bits that work well.

The movie was shot in sub-zero Calgary, Canada, and considering the lengths to which the film makers went to in order to achieve authenticity, it is sad that the finished result was rather less than finished.


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