7.3/10
2,478
42 user 23 critic

The Tracker (2002)

Not Rated | | Drama, History, Western | 8 August 2002 (Australia)
It's 1922; somewhere in Australia. When a Native Australian man is accused of murdering a white woman, three white men (The Fanatic, The Follower and The Veteran) are given the mission of ... See full summary »

Director:

Rolf de Heer

Writer:

Rolf de Heer
16 wins & 16 nominations. See more awards »

Photos

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Cast

Complete credited cast:
David Gulpilil ... The Tracker
Gary Sweet ... The Fanatic
Damon Gameau ... The Follower
Grant Page ... The Veteran
Noel Wilton Noel Wilton ... The Fugitive
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Storyline

It's 1922; somewhere in Australia. When a Native Australian man is accused of murdering a white woman, three white men (The Fanatic, The Follower and The Veteran) are given the mission of capturing him with the help of an experienced Native Australian (The Tracker). So they start their quest in the outback, not knowing that their inner wrestles against and for racism will be more dangerous that the actual hunting for the accused. Written by Bruno Benton

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Taglines:

All men choose the path they walk See more »

Genres:

Drama | History | Western

Certificate:

Not Rated | See all certifications »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

A first for a Rolf de Heer film was the inclusion of songs in this movie. "The thought of me ever making a film with songs in it is quite bizarre," de Heer said. "But it felt right. [It] had to do with the content and lightening it up and subverting it." See more »

Quotes

[first lines]
The Tracker: About half a day ahead, boss, and he's gettin' tired.
The Fanatic: Tell me when it gets to dark. Come on. Keep going.
The Tracker: Okay, boss. Like this?
[mock running and galloping]
The Tracker: We'll catch him quick.
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Connections

Referenced in The Tracker: David Gulpilil - 'I Remember...' (2018) See more »

User Reviews

 
Superb. Original. Captivating. Finally,this important but dark part of Australia's history has been dealt with cinematically in a thorough and intelligent way.
15 August 2002 | by burpboySee all my reviews

I left this brilliant film being excited and proud to be an aspiring Australian film-maker. What a film experience. Surely this is one of the great Australian films, certainly of this current year and without doubt for a long time. I say this film made me feel proud but really, as I was sitting after the film enjoying the warm sunshine and the beauty of the Sydney Opera House and the Sydney Harbour, I was quite ashamed and saddened to be an Australian. The film deals with a very dark and still repressed area of Australian history that goes to the very heart of what it means to be an Australian, what out heritage is and what our role is in relation to this heritage. Rather than give a synopsis (they are always so boring) of how the film deals with these issues, I would just simply implore everyone everywhere (not just Australians) to see this film. I really believe the film has importance and resonance for all people, apart from its issues and meaning I think the film is simply film-making of the highest calibre. Bold, creative, subtle at times as well as appropriately disturbing and unsettling when it needs to be. Rolf De Heer has surely made his best film, a film to make you stand up and take notice of his ability. Visually beautiful (what an amazing country we have) and the use of Aboriginal singer Archie Roach's haunting songs is inspired and integral to the film's impact. I have to make special mention of the actors. Basically the film is a four-hander with Grant Page, Gary Sweet, Damon Gameau and David Gulpill giving outstanding performances. Particularly Sweet, giving authority and complexity to a unlikeable role that Australians would be not used to seeing after his television appearances. Can I also reserve a particular rave for Damon Gameau who plays the role of the young follower. Gameau, just out of drama school, is a real find. The Australian press have not given him the praise that he deserves and acknowledged the exceptional way he manages to convincingly capture the complicated shifts in the arc of his character's journey. For me at the end of the film, Gulpill and Gameau together onscreen deliver the film's final moments with such sensitivity and beautiful chemistry that you can't help but be incredibly moved.

Finally I want to say that above all, at the centre of the story, David Gulpill is just extraordinary (one interviewer described him as our biggest Aboriginal movie star, certainly his performance has to be the highlight of his long and significant career.)You feel everything this film has to say, every part of its journey in his performance. You feel the injustice, the horror, the abuse, the loss of culture and identity. Conclusively, you feel for real that being an Australian means acknowledging that our country, as we now know it, was founded on the invasion and near-obliteration of a pre-existing people and their culture.


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Details

Country:

Australia

Language:

English | Aboriginal

Release Date:

8 August 2002 (Australia) See more »

Also Known As:

El rastro See more »

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Box Office

Opening Weekend USA:

$4,993, 19 January 2004

Gross USA:

$55,188

Cumulative Worldwide Gross:

$672,495
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Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Dolby Digital

Color:

Color

Aspect Ratio:

2.35 : 1
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