7.2/10
5,192
110 user 47 critic

My First Mister (2001)

A 17-year-old girl has a troubled relationship with a 49-year-old man.

Director:

Christine Lahti

Writer:

Jill Franklyn

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From $2.99 (SD) on Prime Video

ON DISC
1 nomination. See more awards »

Photos

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
Rutanya Alda ... Woman at Apartment
Natasha Braisewell Natasha Braisewell ... Girl in Vintage
Albert Brooks ... Randall - 'R'
Henry Brown ... Jack Taylor - Salesman
Gary Bullock ... Mr. Smithman
Kevin Cooney ... Doctor
Nic Costa ... Blaine - Surfer Boy
William Forward ... Customer
John Goodman ... Benjamin
Desmond Harrington ... Randy
Shawn Huff ... Woman at R's Store
Carol Kane ... Mrs. Benson
Michael McKean ... Bob
Chadwick Palmatier Chadwick Palmatier ... Manager
Pauley Perrette ... Bebe
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Storyline

Jennifer does not fit in. A total misfit, she's as wacky as a teenager can be. Goth-ed out with multiple piercings, tattoos, and dyed hair, she listens to strange music, watches vintage TV, eats primarily chocolate, and self injures. But now high school is over and she needs a job. Can she possibly have anything in common with the overweight middle-aged man in the haberdashery window? He gives her a job, not to mention a real friendship. Written by Martin Lewison <milst1@yahoo.com>

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Taglines:

Mismatched. Misguided. Unmistakably friends. See more »

Genres:

Comedy | Drama | Romance

Motion Picture Rating (MPAA)

Rated R for language and some sexual material | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

View content advisory »
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Details

Official Sites:

Paramount Classics

Country:

Germany | USA

Language:

English

Release Date:

26 October 2001 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

Educando a J. See more »

Filming Locations:

Santa Clarita, California, USA See more »

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Box Office

Opening Weekend USA:

$102,456, 14 October 2001, Limited Release

Gross USA:

$621,377, 21 April 2002
See more on IMDbPro »

Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Dolby Digital

Color:

Color

Aspect Ratio:

2.35 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

Leelee Sobieski's character, Jennifer, has a number of facial piercings, and cartilage piercings in both ears, but does not have her earlobes pierced - to which a reference is made in the movie. At the time the movie was made, Leelee herself did not have pierced earlobes, as she did not have them done until 2006. Specially for her part in this movie, she did, however, have both nostrils, both eyebrows and her lip pierced, along with the cartilage of both ears. After filming was completed, she removed the piercings and allowed them to close up again, but kept the jewelry as a souvenir of the movie. See more »

Goofs

When J is talking to Randy from her car after first meeting him, the door is open from his point of view but closed from hers. See more »

Quotes

Randall ("R"): It's just one of those small but enormous things.
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Connections

References The Munsters (1964) See more »

Soundtracks

Soldiers
(1997)
Written by Susan Wallace and Tina Root
Performed by Switchblade Symphony
Used by permission of Cleopatra Records
(Publisher: Big Weirdo Music - BMI)
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User Reviews

One of those small but enormous things
27 October 2001 | by crypticcryticSee all my reviews

If you asked me why I saw this particular film I'd like to tell you that I've seen all of Christine Lahti's films. Truth be told, it's because I'm middle aged white guy with a bad sense of humor and I live vicariously through Albert Brooks. Look at these character contrasts: young girl-old man, freak-straight, red-gray, latte-sanka, rap-jazz, pierced/tattooed-not either. And now the similarities- two lonely relationally challenged, uncommunicative, sarcastic.that feels better. We meet a poet-eulogist Jennifer portrayed by an almost unrecognizable LeLe Sobieski. Self described as "not a girl, but opposite a boy," Jennifer's self-mutilation clearly punctuates her pain. Her art is self-focused until she finds a purpose larger than herself. A Chaplin-esque Randall Harris (Albert Brooks) is introduced dressing a female mannequin. Jennifer's looking at him backward thru binoculars bothers him. This gives her perspective and the opportunity to fantasize. As their relationship develops his intentions seem noble - or repressed - and hers exploratory - and expressed. Controversial? Only in subtext since the age difference will raise questions and eyebrows. And there's the absent father issues. Comedic elements include distorted visuals, costumes, makeup and dialogue. The relationship is treated with such sensitivity - well as much as can be expected when dealing with an alienated teen and it speaks to the emptiness we feel when we're walking around among aliens. "Who do you talk to? Who are your friends?" asks Randall but like most accusatory questions, he could well direct it his own way. At the end of the film, you'll find a toast to go into your repertoire. Watch for it. This quirky film is a must see for all who need a refreshing look at relationships and personal growth. And who among us doesn't?

CyCy


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