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The Worst Films of 2017

When a movie misfires, sometimes it’s simply a good idea gone wrong. More often, though, it’s a terrible idea whose execution reveals just how threadbare the concept really was — and, by extension, the cynical and/or inept process that would greenlight such a movie to begin with. They can’t all be masterpieces, but do bad movies have to be so … demoralizing? Variety chief film critics Owen Gleiberman and Peter Debruge grapple with those cases in their combined list of the Worst Films of 2017. It might surprise you which 10 nearly broke their spirit.

Owen Gleiberman’s 5 worst:

1. “Trespass Against Us

It’s a wackadoo drama that hardly anyone saw or cared about, yet this degree of in-your-face ineptitude simply can’t be allowed to go unrecognized. Michael Fassbender and Brendan Gleeson play father-and-son criminals who live in a makeshift domestic trailer camp, where every moment consists of flamboyant bickering nonsense. The movie unfolds
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Ma Loute director Bruno Dumont: 'You can’t make a "European film"’

Film-making must be local, says French director, after his new Juliette Binoche-starring cannibal comedy premieres at Cannes film festival

There is, according to one its most heralded practitioners, no such thing as a good “European film”.

Speaking at the Cannes film festival, Bruno Dumont, the French director of L’Humanité, Flandres and Hors Satan, refuted the idea that one could or should set out to make films that could be termed “European”.

Continue reading...
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Cannes: Cohen Media Group Nabs North American Rights To ‘Rodin’ (Exclusive)

Cohen Media Group has acquired North American rights to Jacques Doillon’s “Rodin,” a biopic of Auguste Rodin, the revolutionary 19th-century French sculptor who is best known for “The Thinker.” César winner Vincent Lindon (“The Measure of a Man”) stars as Rodin.

The movie will depict Rodin’s relationship with his life-long partner, Rose Beuret, and tumultuous affair with Camille Claudel, his most apt pupil and muse. The movie opens when Rodin enters one of the most productive periods of his career.

“The remarkable life of Auguste Rodin is finally being told in a film that promises to reveal the man behind so many great works of art. We are thrilled to be along on this journey,” said Charles S. Cohen, Chairman and CEO of Cohen Media Group.

“Rodin” also stars Izia Higelin (“Saint Amour”) and Séverine Caneele (“Humanité”) star.

Pic is currently in production.

The pact was negotiated by
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Cannes: Wild Bunch to launch new Hazanavicius, Desplechin, Loznitsa

Exclusive: Slate includes films starring Louis Garrel, Marion Cotillard,

Wild Bunch will kick-off pre-sales at Cannes on Oscar-winner Michel Hazanavicius’s [pictured] new project Redoubtable revolving around the relationship between Jean-Luc Godard and actress Anne Wiazemsky in the late 1960s.

Based on Wiazemsky’s autobiographical account Un An Après, the production will star Louis Garrel as Jean-Luc Godard and Stacy Martin, last seen in High-Rise, as the director’s young muse.

The script kicks off with the 1967 shoot of La Chinoise – about a group of students who try to live by Maoists principles - and follows the couple through the late 1960s when Godard went through his so-called “revolutionary period”.

Wiazemsky – who met Godard when she was just 17-years-old and he was on the rebound from Anna Karina – was married to the filmmaker for more than a decade.

Like Hazanavicius’s Oscar-winning The Artist, the aesthetics and style of Redoubtable will take inspiration from the films around which the
See full article at ScreenDaily »

Cannes: Juliette Binoche Comedy ‘Slack Bay’ Bought for U.S.

Cannes: Juliette Binoche Comedy ‘Slack Bay’ Bought for U.S.
Kino Lorber has acquired North American rights to period comedy “Slack Bay,” which will premiere in competition next month at the Cannes Film Festival.

Starring Juliette Binoche, Fabrice Luchini and Valeria Bruni-Tedeschi, the film will be director Bruno Dumont’s third film to premiere in competition at Cannes, where he previously won the Grand Prix with “Humanité” and “Flanders.”

“Slack Bay” is set in 1910 on the northern French Coast, where several tourists have vanished while relaxing on the beaches. Police inspectors soon realize that the epicenter of these mysterious disappearances must be Slack Bay, where the Slack River and the sea join at high tide and a small community of fishermen and oyster farmers live — among them, the Bréfort ferrymen, led by a patriarch nicknamed “The Eternal.”

The film is produced by 3B Productions and co-produced by Arte French Cinema, Pictanovo and Twenty Twenty Vision in association with Cnc, Canal
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Cannes: Kino Lorber picks up 'Slack Bay'

  • ScreenDaily
Cannes: Kino Lorber picks up 'Slack Bay'
The distributor has pounced on all North American rights to Bruno Dumont’s Cannes competition selection and upcoming world premiere.

Juliette Binoche, Fabrice Luchini and Valeria Bruni-Tedeschi star in the drama produced by 3B Productions and co-produced by Arte French Cinema, Pictanovo, Twenty Twenty Vision in association with Cnc, Canal +, Arte/Wdr and Region Nord Pas de Calais.

Slack Bay takes place in summer 1910 as a pair of inspectors investigate a case of missing tourists on the Channel coast, near a community of fishermen and oyster farmers where a love story plays out between two notorious families.

The film will mark Dumont’s third to premiere in competition on the Croisette. He has previously won grand prix for Humanité and Flanders.

CEO Richard Lorber negotiated the deal with Tanja Meissner, head of sales at worldwide sales agent Memento Films International.

Kino Lorber has collaborated with Dumont on the release of Humanité and Flanders, as well as
See full article at ScreenDaily »

Kino Lorber picks up 'Slack Bay'

  • ScreenDaily
Kino Lorber picks up 'Slack Bay'
The distributor has pounced on all North American rights to Bruno Dumont’s Cannes competition selection and upcoming world premiere.

Juliette Binoche, Fabrice Luchini and Valeria Bruni-Tedeschi star in the drama produced by 3B Productions and co-produced by Arte French Cinema, Pictanovo, Twenty Twenty Vision in association with Cnc, Canal +, Arte/Wdr and Region Nord Pas de Calais.

Slack Bay takes place in summer 1910 as a pair of inspectors investigate a case of missing tourists on the Channel coast, near a community of fishermen and oyster farmers where a love story plays out between two notorious families.

The film will mark Dumont’s third to premiere in competition on the Croisette. He has previously won grand prix for Humanité and Flanders.

CEO Richard Lorber negotiated the deal with Tanja Meissner, head of sales at worldwide sales agent Memento Films International.

Kino Lorber has collaborated with Dumont on the release of Humanité and Flanders, as well as
See full article at ScreenDaily »

Kino Lorber Picks Up Bruno Dumont’s ‘Slack Bay’ – Cannes

Getting in an early swing at a Cannes Competition title, Kino Lorber has acquired Bruno Dumont’s comedy Slack Bay. The company has taken all North American rights to the film, which stars Juliette Binoche, Fabrice Luchini and Valeria Bruni-Tedeschi. This is Dumont’s third film (see trailer above) to premiere in Competition at Cannes after twice winning the Grand Prix with Humanité and Flanders. World sales are handled by Memento Films International. Kino Lorber has had a…
See full article at Deadline Movie News »

Cannes 2016 line-up offers heavyweights, potential gems and food for thought

Cannes 2016 line-up offers heavyweights, potential gems and food for thought
Competition titles include Nicolas Windng Refn’s The Neon Demon [pictured], Jeff NicholsLoving and Xavier Dolan It’s Only The End Of The World.

The Cannes Film Festival unveiled the Official Selection for its 69th edition today at a packed press conference in Paris.

European heavyweights Pedro Almodovar, the Dardenne brothers and Ken Loach are among 20 filmmakers set to compete for the Palme d’Or.

There were few surprises in Competition – aside from the inclusion of Maren Ade’s Toni Erdmann, the first German film in Competition since Wim Wenders’s Palermo Shooting in 2008 – and the news that this year’s Palme d’Or winner will be the closing film.

The more exploratory Un Certain Regard section, however, welcomed a number of newcomers including Romanian director Bogdan Mirica’s Dogs, Us filmmaker Michael O’Shea’s The Transfiguration, and Personal Affairs (Omor Shakhsiya) by Maha Haj, a Palestinian citizen of Israel.

Cannes Film Festival general
See full article at ScreenDaily »

Memento, Binoche board Bruno Dumont’s 'Slack Bay'

Memento, Binoche board Bruno Dumont’s 'Slack Bay'
Exclusive: Ensemble cast features Juliette Binoche, Fabrice Luchini and Valeria Bruni Tedeschi; sales to launch at Cannes Marché.

Memento Films International (Mfi) has secured sales rights to Bruno Dumont’s Slack Bay (Ma Loute), co-starring Juliette Binoche, Fabrice Luchini and Valeria Bruni Tedeschi.

The quirky, dark comedy revolving around an investigation into a series of mysterious disappearances on the beaches of northern France.

The film follows Dumont’s Li’l Quinquin, the four-part TV series that premiered at Cannes in Directors’ Fortnight last year to rave reviews and marked a change in genre for the director of Cannes Grand Prix winners Humanité and Flanders. Some 1.4 million viewers watched the series when it was broadcast in France in September 2014.

Bruno Dumont’s brilliant and hilarious script is a breath of fresh air,” said Mfi sales chief Tanja Meissner.

“We’ve always loved Bruno’s cinema but Li’l Quinquin truly surprised us, becoming a cult
See full article at ScreenDaily »

Memento boards Bruno Dumont’s 'Slack Bay'

Memento boards Bruno Dumont’s 'Slack Bay'
Exclusive: Paris-based sales company, which recently handled Still Alice and Winter Sleep, set to launch sales at Cannes.

Memento Films International (Mfi) has secured sales rights to Bruno Dumont’s Slack Bay (Ma Loute), a quirky, dark comedy revolving around an investigation into a series of mysterious disappearances on the beaches of northern France.

The film follows Dumont’s Li’l Quinquin, the four-part TV series that premiered at Cannes in Directors’ Fortnight last year to rave reviews and marked a change in genre for the director of Cannes Grand Prix winners Humanité and Flanders. Some 1.4 million viewers watched the series when it was broadcast in France in September 2014.

Bruno Dumont’s brilliant and hilarious script is a breath of fresh air,” said Mfi sales chief Tanja Meissner.

“We’ve always loved Bruno’s cinema but Li’l Quinquin truly surprised us, becoming a cult item at once. We’re very excited to work on this project
See full article at ScreenDaily »

Li'l Quinquin Paints Small-Town Milieu with as Much Humor as Violence

Li'l Quinquin Paints Small-Town Milieu with as Much Humor as Violence
Who would have guessed that Bruno Dumont, the divisive French filmmaker best known for oblique, rurally set dramas (including 1999's Humanité and 2006's Flanders, both Grand Prix winners at Cannes), would draw renewed vigor from the loose aesthetic of serial television? Li'l Quinquin, which aired in France as a four-part miniseries, exploits the average TV viewer's familiarity with one-off jokes and untied loose ends, and turns out something rare and rewarding: a Dumont film that paints its small-town milieu with as much humor as violence (though there's a fair dose of that, too) and finds some tenderness in life's absurdities. Li'l Quinquin follows two cartoonish detectives, the wiry, efficient Lieutenant Carpentier (Philippe Jore) a...
See full article at Village Voice »

David Cronenberg Says History Has Absolved His Cannes Jury For Awarding The Dardennes For 'Rosetta' In 1999

The year was 1999, and the competition at the Cannes Film Festival was pretty fierce. Takashi Kitano was in the mix with "Kikujiro," Jim Jarmusch was walking the red carpet with "Ghost Dog: The Way Of The Samurai," and David Lynch arrived with "The Straight Story," but the two movies causing the most buzz on the Croisette were Bruno Dumont's "L'humanité" and Pedro Almodovar's "All About My Mother." Those films were widely seen to be battling for the coveted Palme d'Or but that year, the prize somewhat controversially went to Jean-Pierre and Luc Dardennes' "Rosetta." It was their first Palme, followed by another in 2005 for "L'Enfant," and for David Cronenberg, who was jury president at the time, history has vindicated what was seen as a shocker fifteen years ago. "I think about [Fidel] Castro’s words. He said, 'history will absolve me.' I don’t know if that’ll work for Castro,
See full article at The Playlist »

Cracking Up: A Conversation on Bruno Dumont's "Li'l Quinquin"

  • MUBI
The following exchange took place between critics Michael Pattison and Neil Young over email between 4 and 8 August, not long after Li’l Quinquin screened at Wrocław’s New Horizons International Film Festival—following its world-premiere at Cannes earlier this year, and now playing at the Toronto International Film Festival.

Set in a village in northern France and originally made in four parts for transmission on French television, Bruno Dumont’s latest work is 200 minutes in length and chronicles an unorthodox murder investigation conducted by Capt Van der Weyden (Bernard Pruvost) under the watchful eyes of a rambunctious kid known only by his nickname, Li'l Quinquin (Alane Delhaye).

Spoiler Warning: this exchange reveals and discusses significant plot details of Li’l Quinquin

Michael Pattison: You remarked on Twitter earlier that you were still thinking about Li’l Quinquin a day after seeing it—that, having slept on it, the film
See full article at MUBI »

Interview with Bruno Dumont

Juliette Binoche as Camille Claudel

He has a reputation as a doom-and-gloom minimalist but French director Bruno Dumont is much more than the sum of his parts. In his latest film, Camille Claudel, 1915, he focuses on the ill-fated artist and her internment in a mental asylum after her long affair with Auguste Rodin. Inspired by correspondence between the artist and her younger brother Paul (himself a famous poet and dramaturge), it is a gruelling and meditative study very much in line with the tone of Dumont’s work such as Outside Satan and Humanité. Here he uses disabled people as supporting cast members and for the first time he works with a major star, Juliette Binoche. In the autumn he lightens up with a cop comedy series with a difference for French television. Richard Mowe met Dumont earlier this year in Paris at the Unifrance Rendez-vous with French Cinema.

Richard Mowe: I believe that.
See full article at eyeforfilm.co.uk »

Capsule Movie Reviews (Oct. 16): 'Kill Your Darlings' and six more

New Release

Kill Your Darlings

R, 1 Hr., 40 Mins.

This shocking drama about the earliest days of the Beats is the rare art biopic that sees the dark roots of creativity. In 1943, Allen Ginsberg (Daniel Radcliffe) enters Columbia University and is drawn into the orbit of the floridly brilliant and damaged Lucien Carr (Dane DeHaan). Radcliffe, in a superb performance, captures Ginsberg’s playfully stern poetic passion, Ben Foster nails the aristocratic young rotter William Burroughs, and DeHaan is inspired as a bohemian-turned-killer. A- —Owen Gleiberman

As I Lay Dying

R, 1 Hr., 49 Mins.

James Franco directed this adaptation of the William Faulkner novel,
See full article at EW.com - Inside Movies »

Lorber buys Camille Claudel 1915

  • ScreenDaily
Kino Lorber has picked up all Us rights to Bruno Dumont’s Camille Claudel 1915 starring Juliette Binoche.

Nationwide release will kick off on October 16 with an exclusive engagement at New York’s Film Forum.

Binoche portrays Auguste Rodin’s protégé and later his mistress, who is also the sister of the Christian and mystic poet Paul Claudel and in later years is confined to a mental institution.

Kino Lorber CEO Richard Lorber released Dumont’s first two films in the Us – The Life Of Jesus and Humanité.

Lorber negotiated the deal for Camille Claudel 1915 with Wild Bunch head of international sales Carole Baraton.
See full article at ScreenDaily »

Exclusive Interview with 'The Bunny Game' Director Adam Rehmeier

  • FEARnet
Exclusive Interview with 'The Bunny Game' Director Adam Rehmeier
With cinematographer and 2nd unit director credits already under his belt, Adam Rehmeier burst onto the indie film scene with his feature film directorial debut, The Bunny Game (2012), in which Rodleen Getsic plays a desperate prostitute who ends up fighting for her life after hooking up with a maniacal trucker. The critically-acclaimed black and white film is somber, gritty, and saturated with panic and dread. Rehmeier's follow-up feature is something of a companion piece: Jonas (2013) is a brooding, sinister, and intelligent film that's as fascinating as the director's methods in creating it. Gregg Gilmore plays Jonas, who mysteriously washes up on a beach, then proceeds to gather an audience for "God's Big Message." Jonas will be released September 11th, and you can watch it in its entirety, absolutely free, at jonasmovie.com. Rehmeier generously took some time to discuss with FEARnet his unique films and his intriguing filmmaking tactics. FEARnet:
See full article at FEARnet »

Mark Kermode's DVD round-up

Les Misérables; Side by Side; Hors Satan

Although it may not be the first screen musical to feature live-on-set singing, Les Misérables (2012, Universal, 12) is certainly the most ambitious, a huge, sweeping epic that produced a tidal wave of tears when it opened in UK cinemas. According to news reports, audiences of all ages – both male and female – were weeping openly during the multitudinous dramatic climaxes, a response attributed to the immediacy and intimacy that live voice recording conjured. Certainly, the technique pays dividends, most notably in Oscar-winner Anne Hathaway's breathtakingly fragile rendition of I Dreamed a Dream, delivered in one continuous take, pitched somewhere between a whisper and a scream, between speech and song, with eye-watering results.

Yet for all its intimacy, the film does not skimp on spectacle. Nodding its head toward the lessons of Alan Parker's brilliant Evita, Tom Hooper's profoundly cinematic adaptation of a
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Bruno Dumont, Hors Satan

An abiding presence at the Cannes Film Festival, where he has twice won the Grand Prix, French writer-director Bruno Dumont (Flanders) is arguably one of the most celebrated and least understood auteurs of the contemporary European film scene. Hailed as a neo-Bressonian wunderkind for his remarkable debut Life of Jesus (1997), a portrait of grinding life among provincial French youth, the onetime philosophy teacher returned two years later with Humanité, an opaque detective story that baffled many observers and even incensed some of Dumont’s staunchest champions. Subsequent films, the notoriously carnal Twentynine Palms (2003)— a kind of metaphysical horror exercise …
See full article at Filmmaker Magazine_Director Interviews »
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