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Those Troublesome Tresses (1913)

Seeing an exhibition of jealousy between and a farmer his wife, the Jones and the Millers start a great argument as to whether man or woman is the more liable to that complaint. Talking ... See full summary »

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Mr. Jones
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Mrs. Jones
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Mr. Miller
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Mrs. Miller
Florence Ashbrooke
Richard Leslie
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Storyline

Seeing an exhibition of jealousy between and a farmer his wife, the Jones and the Millers start a great argument as to whether man or woman is the more liable to that complaint. Talking over the matter in the house, the two women plan a trick on their husbands to see whether or not they are jealous. Fake love letters are to be written and posted to themselves. Unfortunately, neither of the ladies notices that the men overhear their talk. Jones and Miller have a great laugh together and agree to try some of that tricky business themselves. They go to a stable at the rear of their property and manage to get some light and dark colored horse hair. Fastening the hairs to resemble curls, they place them so that their wives will find them and grow suspicious. At breakfast time the next morning the letters arrive addressed to the ladies. When, after the men have gone to business. Mrs. Jones finds a curl m her husband's coat pocket, she is in despair and rushes to the house of Mrs. Miller to ... Written by Moving Picture World synopsis

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Short | Comedy

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19 August 1913 (USA)  »

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1.33 : 1
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The Green-Eyed Monster
26 June 2016 | by See all my reviews

Two pairs of married neighbors -- John Bunny and Flora Finch; Wally Van and Lillian Walker -- set out to prove whether men or women are more jealous in this Vitagraph comedy.

John Bunny was Vitagraph's biggest star at this time and was often paired with Miss Finch. With their contrasting physiques, they were a sure comedy pair. Wally Van was also a successful comic actor. The director of this movie, George D. Baker, was frequently the director of Bunny's comedies. when Bunny left Vitagraph to go back on the stage, Baker eventually left the company to helm Metro Pictures.

Although the slapstick comedies of Keystone and its imitators were enormously popular, it would not be until the rise of Roscoe Arbuckle and Charley Chaplin that situational comedies like these were swamped. Vitagraph would not enter the fray in that particular genre until 1916.

If you wish to see this Bunnyfinch -- as the lead pair's comedies were called in the industry -- a good copy can be found on the Eye Institute site on Youtube.


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