4.6/10
703
22 user 5 critic
Rescuers try to reach plane crash victims that are trapped on an isolated Mexican island populated by mutant baboons. Ron Perlman stars as a troubled guide hired to lead the mission.

Director:

Nelson McCormick

Writer:

Michael Thoma
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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
Ron Perlman ... Frank Brodie
Mark Kiely ... Scott Davis
Roxana Zal ... Tara Matthews
Kimberlee Peterson ... Kelsey Cunningham
Guillermo Ríos Guillermo Ríos ... Eddie Mendoza
Richard Fancy ... Deutsch
Julian Sedgwick Julian Sedgwick ... Stan Kovacs
Jimy Hefner Jimy Hefner ... Pilot
Bruno Danza Bruno Danza ... Captain
Ramiro González Ramiro González ... Boat mate (as Ramiro Gonzales)
Lola Noh ... Baboon patriarch (as Lorene Noh)
Gustavo Tecuapetla R. Gustavo Tecuapetla R. ... Baboon player 1
Lincy Anahy Avila G. Lincy Anahy Avila G. ... Baboon player 2
Claudia Acosta A. Claudia Acosta A. ... Baboon player 3
Artemio Arzate H. Artemio Arzate H. ... Baboon player 4
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Storyline

A private plane carrying the daughter of a rich businessman crash-lands on the uninhabited island of San Miguel off the coast of Mexico, an island regarded by the locals as cursed. The businessman's Chief of Security, Scott Davis mounts a high-tech mission to rescue the survivors, and in his search to find a guide, comes across Frank Brodie, a man who was on the island ten years previously. Davis finds Brodie to be a brooding, reclusive drunk, haunted by his experiences on the island, and Brodie tells Davis that it isn't worth mounting a rescue mission as the survivors will, by now, be dead. Brodie, however, decides to tag along, bringing along a veritable arsenal of weapons and a fatalistic attitude, ridiculing Davis' plans as naive. Accompanying them is Tara Matthews, a young woman purporting to be a medic, and Davis' second-in-command, Eddie Mendoza, a down-to-earth practical man who very quickly realizes Brodie knows what he is doing and is inclined to believe what the man says. ... Written by Helen Chavez

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Certificate:

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Details

Country:

USA

Language:

English

Release Date:

6 May 1999 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

Wild World See more »

Filming Locations:

Ixtapa, Guerrero, Mexico See more »

Company Credits

Show more on IMDbPro »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Dolby

Color:

Color
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Did You Know?

Trivia

The working title for the film was "Wild World". See more »

Goofs

When the cave explodes, you can see that it is a stuntman jumping out, not Ron Perlman. See more »

Quotes

Frank Brodie: [Kelsey is dragging a heavy suitcase alongside her] We leave everything here.
[throws it away]
Kelsey Cunningham: That is like a $1000 suitcase.
Frank Brodie: [shoots the suitcase into small pieces] Not any more.
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Connections

References Planet of the Apes (1968) See more »

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User Reviews

 
Retro Cheese-Fest
12 December 2005 | by smittie-1See all my reviews

Say what you will, but this engaging and cruddy little film has at least one major thing going for it- Mr. Ron Perlman, the hardest working, most underrated man to cruise the B-movie circuit since Brad Dourif. Plus, it's got a delicious monologue from the requisite mad scientist.

"Radical? I will show them 'radical'!" As modern TV movies go, Primal Force is more of a throw-back to an age when even the loosest, most derivative stories were set to celluloid with an intense determination and the utmost of integrity...no cheap shots or meta-jokes. Films like Alligator, Island of the Alive, and, of all things, Re-Animator had the same sort of consistent internal logic... and the tour-de-force acting styles of Michael Moriarty and Jeffrey Combs compare to Perlman's attempts at rising above the material. It is a modern movie, though, as the slightly irritating, music video style quick cuts and bwaa-bwaa electric riffs very quickly make clear. Aside from these minor quibbles and typical low budget continuity problems, Primal Force carries its modest concept cleanly through beginning to end, trying as hard as it can to make the material fresh and interesting. I've seen much worse on the Sci-Fi channel, anyway.

Anyone who enjoys '80s style nature-gone-wild flicks should take a look at least for Perlman.


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