7.8/10
2,107
35 user 5 critic

Longitude (2000)

In two parallel stories, the clockmaker John Harrison builds the marine chronometer for safe navigation at sea in the 18th Century and the horologist Rupert Gould becomes obsessed with restoring it in the 20th Century.

Director:

Charles Sturridge

Writers:

Dava Sobel (book), Charles Sturridge
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7 wins & 5 nominations. See more awards »

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
Jeremy Irons ... Rupert Gould
Anna Chancellor ... Muriel Gould
Emma Kay Emma Kay ... Laura Gurney
Samuel West ... Nevil Maskelyne
Ian McNeice ... Dr. Bliss
Michael Gambon ... John Harrison
Ian Hart ... William Harrison
Bill Nighy ... Lord Sandwich
Brian Cox ... Lord Morton
Barbara Leigh-Hunt ... Dodo Gould (as Barbara Leigh Hunt)
Gemma Jones ... Elizabeth Harrison
Peter-Hugo Daly Peter-Hugo Daly ... John Jefferies (as Peter Hugo Daly)
John Leeson ... BBC Producer
Nick Reding Nick Reding ... Captain Campbell
Peter Penry-Jones Peter Penry-Jones ... Surgeon
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Storyline

In the eighteenth century, the only way to navigate accurately at sea was to follow a coastline all the way, which would not get you from Europe to the West Indies or the Americas. Observing the sun or stars would give you the latitude, but not the longitude unless done in conjunction with a clock that would keep time accurately at sea, and no such clock existed. After one too many maritime disasters due to navigational errors, the British Parliament set up a substantial prize for a way to find the longitude at sea. This movie's main story is that of craftsman John Harrison (Sir Michael Gambon). He built a clock that would do the job, what we would now call a marine chronometer. But the Board of Longitude was biased against this approach and claiming the prize was no simple matter. Told in parallel is the twentieth century story of Rupert Gould (Jeremy Irons), for whom the restoration of Harrison's clocks to working order became first a hobby, then an obsession that threatened to ...

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Genres:

Drama | History

Certificate:

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Parents Guide:

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Did You Know?

Trivia

The shipboard scenes were shot aboard three different working ships, then edited to give the impression that it was all happening aboard a single vessel. See more »

Goofs

During the entire movie, when H1 is seen, the ticking that can be heard belongs to H3. The actual H1 and H2 tick in a rather dull way, but H3 is instantly recognizable, which is probably why its sound was used for H1 and H2 too. H4 appears to use the correct sound. See more »

Quotes

Lord Morton: Mr. Harrison, either your father signs an oath agreeing to these terms, or this matter ends here. We are prepared to pay half the award (less those monies paid out), once we are satisfied with the disclosure, and the other half when the new watches made by your father have proved their worth.
William Harrison: Your Honor, if you would just change the wording of "experimental observations", he would, 'e would sign.
Lord Morton: No, no, *no*, *NO*, **NO**!!! How many times do I have to say it to you *bloody people*?!! You do *...
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Connections

Referenced in 500 Days of Summer (2009) See more »

User Reviews

A timely epic
23 July 2000 | by chip98See all my reviews

Long, but worth it! A blessed antidote to MTV's Tom Green and the rest of the scumbag-chic that passes for culture these days. Based on the brilliant history of the same name by Dava Sobel.

In the days when ships measured themselves by yardage of sail and bank of cannon, knowing your north-south latitude was easy. Finding your east-west longitude however (and keeping your ship off the reefs) was hit-and-miss. That could get you killed. The cure was to know the time in London, precisely, but keeping time accurate on a rolling ship was tougher than keeping milk fresh; pendulum clocks need stable ground, and pendulum clocks were all they had.

Queen Anne (Br., 1665-1714) had another idea: a 20,000 pound-sterling prize to anyone who had a solution. Problem was, no one expected a country carpenter cum-clockmaker to do it. John Harrison (Michael Gambon) was that carpenter, and it became *his* problem--a three-decades-long problem. It would also pose one for Rupert Gould (Jeremy Irons) two centuries later, as a marriage-busting, sanity-breaking obsession over restoring Harrison's neglected prototypes: clocks that could keep time at sea better than the quartz-timed digital you might be wearing now.

"Longitude" weaves seamlessly--almost--between the two eras, tracking the exertions and miseries of John Harrison and Rupert Gould with the same kind of synchronicity Harrison spent half his life pitching to astronomers who had scarce respect for the tinkerings of a hayseed. Michael Gambon's passionate performance as John Harrison is truly Oscar-calibre, eclipsing Irons--but only because the tunnel-visioned Rupert Gould is hardly a vehicle for the memorable. Too bad this was "only" a TV mini-series. As a theatrical release it would have lent due reknown to a scarce-remembered true epic of genius.

Watch this when you get the chance. Then go punch Tom Green in the nose.


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Details

Country:

UK | USA

Language:

English

Release Date:

2 January 2000 (UK) See more »

Also Known As:

A hosszúsági fok See more »

Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

(2 parts)

Sound Mix:

Dolby Digital

Color:

Color

Aspect Ratio:

1.85 : 1
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