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The Replacements (2000) Poster

Trivia

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Final film of Jack Warden.
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The Washington team is loosely based on the 1987 replacement Washington Redskins, who won all three of their "replacement" games. The "real" Redskins returned for Week 7 through to the Super Bowl, which they also won. After winning the Super Bowl, the franchise rarely if ever gave the replacement players any credit for the team's success. When the Redskins players received their Super Bowl rings, none of the replacement players received a ring even though it was said that had they not won their games, the team may not have made the playoffs let alone win the Super Bowl. However, after 30 years, the Redskins are finally going to recognize the replacement players' contribution and finally give them their Super Bowl rings. This was announced in March of 2018.
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During filming, Keanu Reeves was offered a tryout with the Baltimore Ravens. The Baltimore Ravens would eventually go on to win Super Bowl XXXV less than 6 months after the film's release.
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The reason everyone refers to Shane Falco's meltdown in the 1996 Sugar Bowl is because there was no game in 1996. This made it easy to avoid having issues with a real player or team. The Sugar Bowl after the 1995 season was played on 12/31/95 (V-Tech def. Texas) and after the 1996 season on 1/2/97 (Florida def. Florida State).
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Keanu Reeves gained 23 pounds for his role as quarterback Shane Falco.
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Training and practice took place at Glen Burnie High School, in Glen Burnie, MD. The football coach worked with the cast and crew on plays.
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Keanu Reeves plays a former quarterback from Ohio State. In Point Break (1991), Reeves' character was also a former quarterback from Ohio State.
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Clifford Franklin (Orlando Jones) is repeatedly seen tightly clutching a football in multiple off-the-field scenes, including in the cafeteria and during the chalk talk (quicksand) scene. This is because of a deleted scene in which Coach McGinty (Gene Hackman) tells Franklin to never let go of the football, in the hopes it will help him reduce dropped passes on the field, a mistake Franklin makes alarmingly often.
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Fumiko's war cry, "Nan desu ka!" in Japanese actually means "What is this?"
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The football scenes were filmed on a weekend, and a company of Army trainees from Aberdeen Proving Ground, MD was part of the crowd.
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The film is set in Washington, D.C. but was filmed in and around Baltimore, MD, including the Baltimore Ravens' stadium.
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Wilkinson (Michael Jace) is afraid to go back to prison in the quicksand scene. In 2016, Jace was convicted of second-degree murder, in the killing of his wife, and was sentenced to prison for 40 years.
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There were plans to do a sequel, but they fell through.
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Archie L. Harris Jr., who plays Wilson Carr, was an actual replacement player during the 1987 NFL strike. He played offensive tackle for the Denver Broncos, who eventually lost in Super Bowl XXII to the Washington Redskins.
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Though the film is not supposed to be connected to the actual 1987 NFLPA strike, there are some similarities between the film depiction of the Washington team and the actual Redskin team: 1. The teams played by Washington in the film mirror the teams the Redskins played during the 1987 scab games (including a Dallas team where all the regular starters crossed the picket line and returned); 2. Shane Falco wears the number 16. Redskins replacement quarterback Ed Ruppert (who played college ball at Louisville) wore that number. Ruppert managed to last three seasons as an Arena Football League quarterback at Albany; 3. The Redskins did have a player named Tony Robinson, who had just been released from prison prior to making the replacement team. The film depicts a player who's on work release to play for the team.
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Mark Robert Ellis and Allan Graf, who play the San Diego Head Coach and Dallas Head Coach, respectively, also served as football coordinators, designing plays, teaching proper techniques, and running a full three-week football camp for the actors and real football players working on the film. Their intention was to make the football aspects of the film as accurate and real as possible, allowing the actors to perform almost all their own football stunts.
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After the onside kick, Falco tackles Bateman; the QB isn't usually on special teams.
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Wilkinson (Michael Jace) is temporarily released from prison to play for the Washington Sentinels. During games, he wears a jersey with the surname Smith, because having a convicted felon on the team would likely draw a lot of unwanted attention/criticism. Coincidentally, Jace was convicted of second-degree murder in 2016 and was sentenced to 40 years to life in prison.
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Earl Wilkinson is based on Tony Robinson, who was a replacement quarterback for the Washington Redskins in a game against the Dallas Cowboys during the 1987 NFL strike. Robinson was an inmate on work release, and he was allowed to play that one game and led the Redskins to a 13-7 victory on Monday Night Football. It was one of the biggest upsets of the 1987 season. Robinson eventually was released from prison in 2012.
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The Japanese name Fumiko is really a female first name.
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The dance that the players are doing to the song "I Will Survive" is actually the "Electric Slide," a popular party dance, which is very easy and can be taught even to young children, which is probably the reason it was used.
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Washington Sentinels running back Walter Cochran (Troy Winbush) not only wears the same number (34) as Chicago Bears legend and hall-of-famer Walter Payton, but the first time he gets the ball, he does a single long jump-stride in open field before he takes off sprinting; this was Payton's signature move.
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The scene filmed in O'Neil's house as shot in one of the buildings owned by publishing company Agora, Inc., located in the historical district of Baltimore called Mt. Vernon. The majority of the scene was filmed in the conference room.
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Clifford Franklin Orlando Jones has a scene where he puts a sticky substance on his hands to help him catch the football. This also was done in Little Giants (1994) by Hanon, played by Troy Simmons.
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Film debut of David Denman.
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When the team raises their glasses to Shane at the bar, Cochran's champagne glass is full of milk. As he's a very religious man, it's fair to assume that he doesn't drink.
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The lunch scene during the practice was filmed in the Press Lounge at PSINet Stadium.
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When coach McGinty (Gene Hackman) is interviewed at halftime during the Dallas game, he responds with "Miles and miles and miles of heart". This is a reference to a statement he made to Shane Falco when McGinty told Falco he was being cut; i.e., that Shane had the miles of heart necessary to be a professional quarterback. This is reminiscent of the song "You Gotta Have Heart" applied to another hapless Washington team (the Senators) in the movie Damn Yankees (1958).
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Mark Steven Johnson did uncredited revisions on the script.
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Carolina Hoyos's debut.
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This movie is loosely based on the 1987 NFL strike in which the NFL used replacement players(called scabs by the regular players and the union). During the replacement games the then Washington Redskins played the following teams: St. Louis Cardinals(W, 28-21) NY Giants(W, 38-12) Dallas Cowboys(W, 13-7)
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Like in the movie, most of the Cowboys regular players including stars Tony Dorsett, Danny White, Ed "Too Tall" Jones and Randy White, crossed the picket line. Unlike the movie, no regular Redskins crossed the picket line.
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Spoilers 

The trivia items below may give away important plot points.

Nigel Gruff kicked a 65-yard field goal to win one of the games. The NFL record for longest field goal at the time this film was made was 63 yards (Matt Prater (III) of the Denver Broncos kicked a 64-yarder in 2013), so Gruff's kick would have set a league record. Update: Justin Tucker of the Baltimore Ravens kicked a 66-yard field goal on September 26, 2021.
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Jack Warden played Sentinels owner Edward O'Neil. He also played Head Coach/Owner George Halas of the Chicago Bears in Brian's Song (1971) and Coach Max Corkel in Heaven Can Wait (1978).
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Goofs | Crazy Credits | Quotes | Alternate Versions | Connections | Soundtracks

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