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Vatel (2000)

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0:53 | Trailer
Vatel is the cook of Prince Condé. When the prince invites Louis XIV to hunt, he has to give lavish banquets in order to fall in his favor. But when Vatel falls in love with the king's mistress, love and duty come into conflict.

Director:

Roland Joffé

Writers:

Jeanne Labrune, Tom Stoppard (English adaptation)
Nominated for 1 Oscar. Another 2 wins & 2 nominations. See more awards »

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
Gérard Depardieu ... François Vatel
Uma Thurman ... Anne de Montausier
Tim Roth ... Marquis de Lauzun
Julian Glover ... Prince de Condé
Julian Sands ... Louis XIV
Timothy Spall ... Gourville
Murray Lachlan Young ... Philippe d'Orleans, 'Monsieur'
Hywel Bennett ... Colbert
Richard Griffiths ... Dr. Bourdelot
Arielle Dombasle ... Princess de Condé
Marine Delterme ... Athenaïs de Montespan
Philippine Leroy-Beaulieu ... Duchesse de Longueville
Jérôme Pradon ... Marquis d'Effiat
Féodor Atkine ... Alcalet
Nathalie Cerda Nathalie Cerda ... The Queen Marie-Thérèse
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Storyline

In 1671, with war brewing with Holland, a penniless prince invites Louis XIV to three days of festivities at a chateau in Chantilly. The prince wants a commission as a general, so the extravagances are to impress the king. In charge of all is the steward, Vatel, a man of honor, talent, and low birth. The prince is craven in his longing for stature: no task is too menial or dishonorable for him to give Vatel. While Vatel tries to sustain dignity, he finds himself attracted to Anne de Montausier, the king's newest mistress. In Vatel, she finds someone who's authentic, living out his principles within the casual cruelties of court politics. Can the two of them escape unscathed? Written by <jhailey@hotmail.com>

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Taglines:

Some men are too noble to live among aristocracy.


Motion Picture Rating (MPAA)

Rated PG-13 for sexual content and some violence | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

View content advisory »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

The film opened the 2000 Cannes Film Festival. See more »

Goofs

Effiat quotes Melville's Captain Ahab (Moby Dick) when playing with the whale, but it was another 200 years before Melville wrote Moby Dick. See more »

Quotes

Louis XIV: Peace with the Dutch is good for nothing, except tulips.
See more »

Connections

Featured in Arcimboldo: Nature and Fantasy (2010) See more »

Soundtracks

Secundo pezzo
Composed by Ennio Morricone
text based on "Le Bourgeois Gentilhomme" by Molière
Performed by Arielle Dombasle
See more »

User Reviews

One of the year's best films
17 January 2001 | by tprofumoSee all my reviews

Roland Joffe's "Vatel" does something few movies can do these days: it takes you to a place you've never been before.

The French made film has Louie XIV visiting a poor province ruled by an improverished prince, who must put on spectacular entertainment fit for the Sun King. There's more than the King's time at stake here, though, for Louie wants the prince to lead his army, should France go to war with Holland, and the Prince desperately needs Louie's financial help, to save his nearly brankrupt province.

Enter the prince's chief steward, Vatel, played by Gerard Depardiue. A combination French chief extraordinaire and showman supreme, he not only serves up unbelieveable meals, but also puts on shows that would out do James Cameron, and does it on a much smaller budget. From pop up lawn decorations to fire works extravaganzas that would shame the Chinese, Vatel displays a genius for spectacle that will literally leave you breathless.

"Vatel" the movie includes lots of court intrigue and some fine acting from those carrying it out. Deparidieu delivers an unexpected performance as Vatel. Rather than the explosive, temperamental French chief, he plays this 17th century showman as a harried administrator who is trying keep a lot of balls in the air at the same time he must navigate the tricky waters of French politics. It's an understated performance in which much of what is going on is behind his eyes (and probably in his stomach ulcers) rather than on the surface.

His protagonists are Julian Sands as the petulant,devious King and Tim Roth as the chief court intriguer, kind of an early version of a political advance man. Uma Thurman is a lady in waiting who has caught all three men's eyes.

All are good, but what sets "Vatel" off is the visuals which give you a look at spectacle the likes of which this writer had never before seen. This film should walk away with all the set design, costume design and effects Oscars hands down. It is one of the most incredible visual experiences in film history. See it in the theaters, though, and not squashed into a TV screen.


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Details

Official Sites:

Official site

Country:

France | UK | Belgium

Language:

English

Release Date:

10 May 2000 (France) See more »

Also Known As:

Vatel See more »

Filming Locations:

Château de Chantilly, France

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Box Office

Budget:

$36,000,000 (estimated)

Opening Weekend USA:

$16,032, 1 January 2001

Gross USA:

$51,080

Cumulative Worldwide Gross:

$184,301
See more on IMDbPro »

Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Dolby Digital

Color:

Color

Aspect Ratio:

2.35 : 1
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