7.8/10
253,019
1,686 user 286 critic

Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon (2000)

Wo hu cang long (original title)
Trailer
2:04 | Trailer
A young Chinese warrior steals a sword from a famed swordsman and then escapes into a world of romantic adventure with a mysterious man in the frontier of the nation.

Director:

Ang Lee

Writers:

Du Lu Wang (book), Hui-Ling Wang (screenplay) | 2 more credits »
Popularity
1,560 ( 13)
Won 4 Oscars. Another 98 wins & 134 nominations. See more awards »

Videos

Photos

Edit

Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
Yun-Fat Chow ... Master Li Mu Bai (as Chow Yun Fat)
Michelle Yeoh ... Yu Shu Lien
Ziyi Zhang ... Jen Yu (Mandarin version) / Jiao Long (English dubbed version) (as Zhang Ziyi)
Chen Chang ... Lo 'Dark Cloud' / Luo Xiao Hu
Sihung Lung ... Sir Te
Pei-Pei Cheng ... Jade Fox (as Cheng Pei-Pei)
Fazeng Li Fazeng Li ... Governor Yu
Xian Gao Xian Gao ... Bo
Yan Hai Yan Hai ... Madame Yu
Deming Wang Deming Wang ... Police Inspector Tsai / Prefect Cai Qiu
Li Li ... May (as Li Li)
Suying Huang ... Auntie Wu
Jinting Zhang Jinting Zhang ... De Lu
Rui Yang Rui Yang ... Maid
Kai Li Kai Li ... Gou Jun Pei
Edit

Storyline

In early nineteenth-century China, in the waning years of the Qing dynasty, the renowned swordsman who yearns for enlightenment, Li Mu Bai, decides to give up his legendary Green Destiny sword: the sharp four-hundred-year-old blade of heroes. To mark the end of a blood-stained career, Li entrusts the excellent female warrior, Yu Shu Lien, with the precious weapon to deliver it to Governor Yu; however, once there, an audacious and nimble masked thief manages to steal it. As Shu Lien is hot on the trail of the skilled burglar, unrequited loves; fervent passions; an unconquerable desire for freedom, and bitter loose ends stand in the way. Can Mu Bai shake off his violent past? Written by Nick Riganas

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Taglines:

A film by Ang Lee See more »


Motion Picture Rating (MPAA)

Rated PG-13 for martial arts violence and some sexuality | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

View content advisory »
Edit

Did You Know?

Trivia

Jet Li was originally cast to play Li Mu Bai but turned the part down to appear in Romeo Must Die (2000). The role was next offered to Hong Kong singer/actor Leon Lai, but he also turned it down. See more »

Goofs

(at around 1h 7 mins) When Jen stabs Lo with the arrow in Lo's cave, blood trickles out from a spot about two inches above the injury. See more »

Quotes

[first lines]
Man: Master Li is here! Master Li is here!
See more »

Crazy Credits

The opening title appears in Chinese and English. See more »

Alternate Versions

The English subtitles on the DVD are translated differently than the original theatrical version. See more »

Connections

Referenced in Chow Yun-Fat Goes Hollywood (2001) See more »

Soundtracks

Moonlight Lover
(Mandarin Version)
Music Composed by Jorge Calandrelli, Dun Tan
Lyrics by Chia-Yang Yi
Performed by CoCo Lee featuring Cello Solo by Yo-Yo Ma
Coco Lee appears courtesy of Sony Music Entertainment (Holland) B.V.
See more »

User Reviews

 
My Dream Came True
31 December 2000 | by jasmine_kungSee all my reviews

As Ang Lee, I grew up reading wuxia novels in Taiwan. Those novels usually mixed engrossing history, thrilling action, enchanting romance. But when these novels were made into movies or TV series, none of them could match my imagination. It's either because of wrong casting, bad acting, tedious costumes, sloppy storytelling, minimal budget (so everything is shot in studio rather than in the grand Chinese landscapes as they were told in books), fake action... I could go on and on. Now Ang Lee finally made a wuxia film that captures my imagination and fulfills my dream of childhood.

The casting of CTHD is perfect. No disrespect to Jet Li, but Jet Li would not make Li Mu Bai into what he should be: noble, wise but weary. Chow Yun Fat conveys the unspoken feelings of Li Mu Bai in a way I can't imagine anyone else can. But he's known for his acting, Michelle Yeoh was known for her fighting skills. Here in CTHD, she proves herself as an excellent dramatic actress. The secrete longing for Li and the confusion of Li's true feelings were clearly conveyed by her eyes. The scenes between them are heartbreaking. Zhang Zi Yi is a true discovery! What a wonderful talent to steal scenes after scenes from the veterans around her. She ran from looking innocent, haughty, feisty to loving and distraught. She made the complex Jen a real flesh and blood believable human being. Chang Chen made a perfectly sexy and charming bandit.

The scenery and the photography was beyond belief. The majestic landscapes of China match my imagination when I read all the beautiful Chinese poems of the Tang and Sung dynasties. No wonder those poets could come up with those masterpieces. They sure had the best inspiration. Peter Pau not only captured the landscapes and the settings, he also managed to capture the fast-as-lightening action wonderfully. The shot of Jen gliding over water just lodged in my mind. The soundtrack is also excellent. Tan Dun used different instruments to match the different locales. He mixed in Central Asian music in the desert sequence and Chinese flute in the Southern China scenes. Yo-yo Ma's cello in the main theme makes me want to weep everytime I hear it.

The storytelling was also done expertly. As a romantic-at-heart, I love the desert romance between Jen and Lo. It's one of the most charming and believable love stories that I can remember. Most people gave credit of the fighting to Yuen Wo Ping. I'd give kudos to Ang Lee. I've seen Yuen's martial art films before, but they're never done in such an imaginative and artistic way. The artistic vision has to come from Ang Lee.

To sum it up, three cheers for Ang Lee! You not only fulfilled your childhood dream, you fulfilled mine too. It's such a pleasure to finally see a wuxia novel be done right. Thank you! Thank you! Thank you!


220 of 266 people found this review helpful.  Was this review helpful to you? | Report this
Review this title | See all 1,686 user reviews »

Frequently Asked Questions

See more »
Edit

Details

Official Sites:

Official Facebook

Country:

Taiwan | Hong Kong | USA | China

Language:

Mandarin

Release Date:

12 January 2001 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon See more »

Filming Locations:

Anhui Province, China See more »

Edit

Box Office

Budget:

$17,000,000 (estimated)

Opening Weekend USA:

$663,205, 10 December 2000

Gross USA:

$128,078,872

Cumulative Worldwide Gross:

$213,525,736
See more on IMDbPro »

Company Credits

Show more on IMDbPro »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Dolby Digital | Dolby Atmos

Color:

Color (Technicolor)

Aspect Ratio:

2.39 : 1
See full technical specs »

Contribute to This Page



Recently Viewed