7.8/10
253,075
1,686 user 286 critic

Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon (2000)

Wo hu cang long (original title)
Trailer
2:04 | Trailer
A young Chinese warrior steals a sword from a famed swordsman and then escapes into a world of romantic adventure with a mysterious man in the frontier of the nation.

Director:

Ang Lee

Writers:

Du Lu Wang (book), Hui-Ling Wang (screenplay) | 2 more credits »
Popularity
1,560 ( 13)
Won 4 Oscars. Another 98 wins & 134 nominations. See more awards »

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
Yun-Fat Chow ... Master Li Mu Bai (as Chow Yun Fat)
Michelle Yeoh ... Yu Shu Lien
Ziyi Zhang ... Jen Yu (Mandarin version) / Jiao Long (English dubbed version) (as Zhang Ziyi)
Chen Chang ... Lo 'Dark Cloud' / Luo Xiao Hu
Sihung Lung ... Sir Te
Pei-Pei Cheng ... Jade Fox (as Cheng Pei-Pei)
Fazeng Li Fazeng Li ... Governor Yu
Xian Gao Xian Gao ... Bo
Yan Hai Yan Hai ... Madame Yu
Deming Wang Deming Wang ... Police Inspector Tsai / Prefect Cai Qiu
Li Li ... May (as Li Li)
Suying Huang ... Auntie Wu
Jinting Zhang Jinting Zhang ... De Lu
Rui Yang Rui Yang ... Maid
Kai Li Kai Li ... Gou Jun Pei
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Storyline

In early nineteenth-century China, in the waning years of the Qing dynasty, the renowned swordsman who yearns for enlightenment, Li Mu Bai, decides to give up his legendary Green Destiny sword: the sharp four-hundred-year-old blade of heroes. To mark the end of a blood-stained career, Li entrusts the excellent female warrior, Yu Shu Lien, with the precious weapon to deliver it to Governor Yu; however, once there, an audacious and nimble masked thief manages to steal it. As Shu Lien is hot on the trail of the skilled burglar, unrequited loves; fervent passions; an unconquerable desire for freedom, and bitter loose ends stand in the way. Can Mu Bai shake off his violent past? Written by Nick Riganas

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Taglines:

A film by Ang Lee See more »


Motion Picture Rating (MPAA)

Rated PG-13 for martial arts violence and some sexuality | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

View content advisory »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

The film holds the record for the most Oscar nominations for a foreign language film along with Roma (2018) with 10 nominations. Additionally, it shares the record for most Oscar wins by a foreign language film with Fanny and Alexander (1982) and Parasite (2019). All three films won four awards. See more »

Goofs

(at around 1h 7 mins) When Jen stabs Lo with the arrow in Lo's cave, blood trickles out from a spot about two inches above the injury. See more »

Quotes

[first lines]
Man: Master Li is here! Master Li is here!
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Crazy Credits

The opening title appears in Chinese and English. See more »

Alternate Versions

When aired for the first time on television in Australia (Sunday, 12 September 2004) on their free-to-air international channel SBS, SBS used their own international translators to subtitle the movie from scratch, resulting in quite a few changes reflecting character names (some different spelling, most directly spelt from their Mandarin forms and not changed/altered into more Western forms), and a much closer, 'truer' explanation of events and people than the 'dumbed-down' translation of other DVD releases offer. See more »

Connections

References Once Upon a Time in China (1991) See more »

Soundtracks

Moonlight Lover
(Mandarin Version)
Music Composed by Jorge Calandrelli, Dun Tan
Lyrics by Chia-Yang Yi
Performed by CoCo Lee featuring Cello Solo by Yo-Yo Ma
Coco Lee appears courtesy of Sony Music Entertainment (Holland) B.V.
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User Reviews

 
Breathtakingly Beautiful...
10 September 2000 | by DrakkhenSee all my reviews

As a film student living in Toronto, I look forward to the Toronto International Film Festival every year. Last year, the highlight of the festival for me was American Beauty. This year, it would have to be (so far) Ang Lee's "Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon".

Being of Asian descent, I've seen my share of wu xia genre movies to last me a life time. However, most of them are so centred on the fighting, that they forget the rest of the elements that are involed. The movie turns into one long scripted fighting scene with maybe a slight hint of story. Crouching Tiger, on the other hand realizes these issues, and builds these oh-so entertaining action sequences into an epic with typical asian themes such as true love and honour.

Being an epic, one would expect the usual long takes and establishing shots, and boy does it ever look beautiful. Traversing through a myriad of regions spanning the lengh of China (from the deserts to bamboo forests, to mountains high in the clouds), the film soley based on its asthetic properties is nothing short of stunning. The lighting of different landscapes and the exquisitly designed costumes all radiate with stunning colour. And then there's the cinemetography. Wow! The backdrops, establishing shots look absolutely marvelous. If your jaw dropped when you saw Rome and its coliseum in Gladiator, wait until you see ancient Beijing recreated on the screen!

Okay, so it's a good looking movie. What about the story? The complexity of the plot is rather sparse, probably reminiscent of epics such as Braveheart or Gladiator, which is by no means a bad thing. Although both Chow Yun Fat and Michelle Yeo did have major parts, this movie belongs mostly to Zhang Ziyi who IMHO did an amazing job playing a very complex role (one which required her to represent nobily as a princess, naivness, as well as show inner strength). Mainly concentrating on her unwillingness to give in to the ideals of an arranged marriage, the decently written script adds a story of an old warrior trying to retire and a 300+ year old sword.

All in all, this film blends story, well choreographed action, and a stylistic eye to create a mythilogical piece that not only represents the wu xia genre justly by doing it well, but also contributes to raising the quality of filmmaking usually applied in the making of a similar type of film.


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Frequently Asked Questions

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Details

Official Sites:

Official Facebook

Country:

Taiwan | Hong Kong | USA | China

Language:

Mandarin

Release Date:

12 January 2001 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon See more »

Filming Locations:

Anhui Province, China See more »

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Box Office

Budget:

$17,000,000 (estimated)

Opening Weekend USA:

$663,205, 10 December 2000

Gross USA:

$128,078,872

Cumulative Worldwide Gross:

$213,525,736
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Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Dolby Digital | Dolby Atmos

Color:

Color (Technicolor)

Aspect Ratio:

2.39 : 1
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