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Discovering Hamlet (1990)

Not Rated | | Drama, Documentary | TV Movie
A unique, behind-the-scenes look at Shakespeare's great play. In 1988, rising star Kenneth Branagh played the Prince of Denmark for the first time. His guide through four weeks of ... See full summary »

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Himself / Hamlet
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Richard Easton ...
Himself / Claudius
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Himself
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Himself / Polonius
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Herself / Ophelia
Jay Villiers ...
Himself / Laertes
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Himself / Guildenstern
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A unique, behind-the-scenes look at Shakespeare's great play. In 1988, rising star Kenneth Branagh played the Prince of Denmark for the first time. His guide through four weeks of rehearsals at England's Birmingham Repertory Theatre: famed actor Derek Jacobi, "the best Hamlet of his generation" (New York Times). Watch what happens from the first dress rehearsal to the tension-filled opening night. Narrated by Patrick Stewart. Written by Anonymous

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Drama | Documentary

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Not Rated
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Narrator: In the history of dramatic literature, there is one name that will always be remembered.
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Branagh as Hamlet
30 August 2005 | by See all my reviews

I saw this production of _Hamlet_ in London in late 1988. I had never heard of Kenneth Branagh then--nor Sir Derek Jacobi for that matter! I was an American English major beginning a junior year abroad in England, and I had the quaint idea that I'd spend my first night in London seeing _Hamlet_. It's safe to say I was not the most sophisticated member of the audience, so I won't hazard any evaluations of the production.

What I do remember vividly is that the play was radically edited. They didn't do the "To be or not to be" soliloquy at all, and some of the lines were re-allocated to different characters. Peter O'Toole, who was sitting two rows in front of me, shook his head in disapproval quite a few times during the play.


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