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Hatchie Is Saying Goodbye to Pop Cliche

Hatchie Is Saying Goodbye to Pop Cliche
Harriette Pilbeam was struggling to write songs for her new album when, one day last year, she suddenly had an idea.

“I was like, ‘I want to write a song that’s super simple, really repetitive, just a straight-up compressed New Order pop song,’” says the singer-songwriter better known as Hatchie. “And that’s what happened.”

The result, “Obsessed,” is a riff-driven highlight off Keepsake, Hatchie’s thrilling new debut. The album arrives a year after the sugar-rush pop of Sugar & Spice, an Ep that introduced her as a
See full article at Rolling Stone »

Evan Peters on Playing His Most Insane 'Ahs' Character Yet, Working With Emma Roberts & Directing (Exclusive)

Evan Peters on Playing His Most Insane 'Ahs' Character Yet, Working With Emma Roberts & Directing (Exclusive)
Warning: Spoilers ahead! Do not proceed if you haven't watched the season finale of American Horror Story: Cult.

Evan Peters is opening up about his "most difficult" season of American Horror Story yet.

During an exclusive interview with Et on Tuesday, the 30-year-old actor revealed what it was like taking on the lead role of Kai Anderson in Ahs: Cult and how he felt about that shocking season finale.

Over the course of seven seasons, Peters has been cast in a number of villainous roles, like Tate Langdon in Murder House, Jimmy Darling in Freak Show and James March in Hotel. But none have come close to Kai, whom Peters says was probably his favorite character he's portrayed in FX's anthology series thus far.

More: 'Ahs: Cult' Premiere: Evan Peters' Pro-Trump Character Revealed!

Photo: Frank Ockenfels/FX

"Kai has been a really challenging role, the hardest role that I had to do, so in that respect
See full article at Entertainment Tonight »

An Endless Feast: Reflections on Marathon Viewing

  • MUBI
What is the longest film you’ve ever seen? How would you describe the film’s effect on your body and on your psyche? Do you shy away from certain films due to their length, or does the prospect of a long movie excite you?In his Notebook feature on Krzysztof Kieślowski’s ten-hour long Dekolag (1988), Forrest Cardamenis points out the essential makeup of our contemporary viewing experience, which looks quite different from the cinematic landscape at the time of Dekolag’s release. Nowadays, the majority of our viewing is done in our homes, streamed rather than caught in a cinema, and the television season rather than film is our motion picture vehicle of choice. Watching lengthy narratives in the on-demand way is designed not to be particularly challenging. Most of it is laid out in an episodic format, the prime example being the television show with its convenient 20, 40, or
See full article at MUBI »

The Past, Present, and Future of Real-Time Films Part Two

Sidney And The Sixties: Real-time 1957-1966

Throughout the 1950s, Hollywood’s relationship with television was fraught: TV was a hated rival but also a source of cheap talent and material, as in the case of the small-scale Marty (1955), which won the Best Picture Oscar. These contradictions were well represented by the apparently “televisual” 12 Angry Men (1957), which began life as a teleplay concerning a jury with a lone holdout who must, and eventually does, convince his fellow jurors of the defendant’s innocence. Its writer, Reginald Rose, persuaded one of Hollywood’s biggest stars, Henry Fonda, to become a first-time producer of the film version. Fonda and Rose took basement-low salaries in favor of future points, and hired a TV director, Sidney Lumet, for next to nothing because Lumet wanted a first feature credit. Technically, there’s an opening bit on the courtroom steps that keeps this from being a true real-time film,
See full article at SoundOnSight »

Watch: Rare 30-Minute Concert 'The Velvet Underground In Boston' Directed By Andy Warhol

Of course, everyone knows Andy Warhol, the Pop Art leader and hugely influential figure that made modern art accessible and commercial on a scale no one quite thought possible at the time. But most folks know less about his more difficult film work, fare like the five-hour-plus "Sleep" (which is exactly what it sounds like), the eight-hour "Empire," and "Blow Job." But one that will certainly pique the interest of rock 'n' roll fans is this recently unearthed concert movie around one of the most important acts of all time. The Warhol Museum recently dug up the 30-minute "The Velvet Underground In Boston," directed by Warhol, that offers rare color footage of the band in action. Warhol was an early collaborator with the band, and this 1967 movie is less a document of the music, and more a portrait of the scene at the time, giving folks a glimpse of what
See full article at The Playlist »

50 Greatest Film Documentaries

Documentaries embody the adage that the truth is stranger than fiction. They shine a torch into the darkest corners of the earth and tell the stories of extraordinary people; both the famous and the forgotten. The invention of home video (and, more recently, the camera phone) has effectively made directors and documentarians of us all. But let’s start at the beginning.

In 1896, the Lumière brothers wowed the world with their L’arrivée d’un train en gare de La Ciotat, a silent, fifty-second film of a train leaving a platform. There’s the tale (perhaps apocryphal) of the audience at its first public screening frantically trying to escape the train racing through the screen towards them. The power of film, and indeed the documentary, was unleashed.

Considered the first feature-length example of the genre, Robert J. Flaherty’s Nanook of the North (1922) captured Inuk Nanook and his family living,

Big Brother: this pop-endurance challenge remains oddly mesmeric

Why does Australia still surrender to Big Brother? Because it fulfils our need for art-as-endurance

In the decade since its debut, Big Brother has changed its format only a little. What has altered is the temperature in which this fever-dream was conceived. Twelve years ago, Big Brother was a hot, hot hothouse. Now that the commonplace on telly is commonplace, our interest has cooled into a new reverie.

Once it was with real interest but now it is with a sort of compulsive unconcern we see the ordinary unfold at DreamWorld. While I watched Sara-Marie Fedele's "bum dance" with real warmth, there is a cold distance between me and Tahan – doomed in the first week of this newest cycle on Nine to wear nothing but a crocheted bikini.

In 2002, the spectacle of unremarkable people was in itself remarkable. Now, they're just actually unremarkable. So unremarkable. There is no one
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

Andy Warhol's iconic New York anti-films come to London

Warhol's most famous movies – including Sleep, a five-hour film of his lover dozing – perfectly capture the avant garde New York of the Velvet Underground and the Chelsea hotel

This weekend the Ica will be showing new prints of some of Andy Warhol's most famous films – Sleep, Vinyl and Chelsea Girls. These consciously crude and raw films of the 1960s New York avant garde have been restored by MoMA and the Whitney Museum of American Art and the only surprise is that they're getting such a short outing at a single London cinema. A national release of some kind is called for, surely?

I say that, but I have never actually seen Chelsea Girls. And yet I feel as if I have watched it many times. I got to know and love it indirectly when I was 15, through a vinyl album by Nico that I bought at a record shop in Wrexham.
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Tilda Swinton to Occasionally Sleep in a Glass Box at MoMA

  • Vulture
Tilda Swinton to Occasionally Sleep in a Glass Box at MoMA
Pretty much everything Tilda Swinton does is great, so when she showed up to sleep alongside a jug of water on a mattress in a glass box at MoMA on Friday, she immediately became the greatest thing in sleeping art since Andy Warhol's never-ending Sleep film. "Museum staff doesn't know she's coming until the day of, but she's here today," a museum source told Gothamist (who took some fun photos.) The performance, titled "The Maybe," will remain "unannounced" and "random" and will last for a full day when it happens. Swinton (who's done this before in London and Rome) hasn't said anything about the piece, and MoMA's official comments only confirmed that there would be "no published schedule for its appearance, no artist's statement released, no museum statement beyond this brief context, no public profile or image issued. Those who find it chance upon it for themselves, live and
See full article at Vulture »

Tilda Swinton to Occasionally Sleep in a Glass Box at MoMA

  • Vulture
Tilda Swinton to Occasionally Sleep in a Glass Box at MoMA
Pretty much everything Tilda Swinton does is great, so when she showed up to sleep alongside a jug of water on a mattress in a glass box at MoMA on Friday, she immediately became the best thing in sleeping art since Andy Warhol's never-ending Sleep film. "Museum staff doesn't know she's coming until the day of, but she's here today," a museum source told Gothamist (who also took some fun photos.) The performance, titled The Maybe, will remain "unannounced" and "random" and will last for a full day when it happens. Swinton (who's done this before in London and Rome) hasn't said anything about the piece, and MoMA's official comments only confirmed that there would be "no published schedule for its appearance, no artist's statement released, no museum statement beyond this brief context, no public profile or image issued. Those who find it chance upon it for themselves, live
See full article at Vulture »

Homosexuality and Censorship: Lacma mini-film series showcases works by Genet, Warhol, Van Sant

Landmark and controversial Gay movies at Lacma On March 23, the Los Angeles County Museum of Art will be screening two film programs inspired by its current Robert Mapplethorpe exhibit: "America’s Most Wanted: The Queer Underground," featuring Jack Smith's Flaming Creatures, Jean Genet's Un Chant d'Amour, and Kenneth Anger's Scorpio Rising; and "Temptations: My Hustler and Mala Noche," featuring Andy Warhol's My Hustler and Gus Van Sant's Mala Noche. The screenings are free of charge. The 26-minute Un Chant d'Amour is Genet's sole film; considering its theme and stylistic approach, the film, as to be expected, faced censorship issues at the time of its first screening in the U.S. in 1966 (sixteen years after it was made). The Lacma release (see below more information on each film) describes Un Chant d'Amour (aka "A Song of Love") as "an iconic landmark of queer cinema for its lyrical,
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

The Black Hole Of The Camera: The Films Of Andy Warhol

Forget everything you think you know about Andy Warhol.

With the brilliant new book The Black Hole of the Camera: The Films of Andy Warhol, author J. J. Murphy obviously focuses in on the artist’s filmmaking career. However, Murphy may just be the first writer to integrate movies such as Couch, Eat, Empire, Lonesome Cowboys and The Chelsea Girls into the totality of Warhol’s artistic pursuits, i.e. silk screening, painting, filmmaking, videomaking, tape recording and photography.

This is, unbelievably, the first time in cinema scholarship such an endeavor has ever been undertaken. That may seem like a shame, particularly given Warhol’s enormous filmic output and his stature as one of the most important artists of the 20th century. Yet, it’s clear it’s been worth the wait for such an astute writer and Warhol film fan like Murphy to finally tackle the topic.

Previously, one
See full article at Underground Film Journal »

Mickey Factz Changed His Identity For Mickey Mause Mixtape

Bronx Mc tells Mixtape Daily what it took to 'become' Mickey Mause, the 1980s graffiti artist at the center of his new mixtape.

By Rob Markman

Mickey Factz

Photo: MTV News

Don't Sleep: Necessary Notables

Headliner: Mickey Factz

Mixtape: Mickey Mause

Essential Info: Chances are you won't hear any tracks from Mickey Factz's Mickey Mause mixtape burning up radio, but that doesn't make it any less poignant. Lupe Fiasco dubbed it a "#MasterPiece" on Twitter and even Swizz Beatz gave it a push, sending out the link over the social networking site.

The highly conceptualized tape, which samples from producers Danger Mouse and deadmau5, finds the Bronx Mc in character. He isn't Mickey Factz, but instead Mickey Mause, a 1980s graffiti artist who strives to make a name for himself among the greats like Jean-Michel Basquiat, Andy Warhol, Keith Haring, Kenny Scharf and Fab Five Freddy.

On his way to infamy,
See full article at MTV Music News »

The Future is Video Games - Not Films. Maybe

Commenting on the critics with Simon Columb...

Steven Poole writes for The Guardian on March 11th about the financial success of the gaming industry...

"The fastest-selling cultural product in history was created by people you've probably never heard of. While this year's Oscars honoured films in which the movie business sweetly congratulates itself on its own birth – The Artist, Hugo – the most dollar-hoovering entertainment release ever is not a film, still less an album; it's a video game. Coming out last autumn, Modern Warfare 3 – a blockbuster military shooter made by a Californian game studio called Infinity Ward – took just 16 days to gross $1bn, beating by one day the previous record set by a film about blue people in space."

The article is fascinating as it delves deeper into the hugely successful brand of Rockstar games - the company behind Grand Theft Auto. Read the full article here.

Clearly the gaming industry is growing - financially,
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

Andy Warhol Would Have Been 83 Today

Andy Warhol, the insanely influential and iconic multimedia pop artist, was born on Aug. 6, 1928. He would have been 83 today. He passed away on Feb. 22, 1987 following complications due to gall bladder surgery, which really sucks because one gets the feeling that Andy would have totally loved and embraced the Internet and incorporated it into his work.

Warhol made the bulk of his films between 1963 and 1968 when he became notorious for shooting extremely long movies of monotonous tasks. Many of these movies were named after the task performed on camera, including Sleep, Eat, Kiss and Haircut.

But the most notorious of his static films is 1964′s Empire, a non-moving cinematic portrait of the spire of NYC’s Empire State Building that, when screened, runs for 8 hours. Empire was photographed by Jonas Mekas and the filming of which was named Bad Lit: The Journal of Underground Film’s sixth most outrageous moment in underground film history.
See full article at Underground Film Journal »

Wamg Sits In On Pirates Of The Caribbean: On Stranger Tides Press Conference With Johnny Depp, Geoffrey Rush, Penelope Cruz, Ian McShane, Rob Marshall & Jerry Bruckheimer

On Thursday, May 5th, Wamg attended the Pirates Of The Caribbean: On Stranger Tides press conference at the swanky Montage Hotel in Beverly Hills. Speaking to a room of over 300 members of the media, producer Jerry Bruckheimer, along with director Rob Marshall and the entire star-studded cast talked about their experience making the film.

In attendance were Johnny Depp (Jack Sparrow), Penelope Cruz (Angelica), Geoffrey Rush (Barbossa), Ian McShane (Blackbeard), Astrid Berges-Frisbey (Syrena), Sam Claflin (Philip), Rob Marshall / Director, and Jerry Bruckheimer / Producer.

Photo: From Penelope Cruz’s Star On Walk of Fame.

Pete Hammond from Deadline.com was the the afternoon’s moderator. Below is a sampling of the press conference which includes insight on Pirates 5 & 6 and where things stand on The Lone Ranger project.

Female Speaker: Hi. My question is the Captain Jack. You are saying you enjoy playing Captain Jack because you have [inaudible] and absolutely abstract. How
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

Johnny Depp reveals a unique idea hatched for Pirates 5 and 6

Johnny Depp reveals a unique idea hatched for Pirates 5 and 6
Movieline has reported on a “Pirates of the Caribbean: On Stranger Tides” press conference in which Johnny Depp and producer Jerry Bruckheimer talk more about the film. Depp also reveals an interesting idea that may or may not show up in the later “Pirates” installments. “There’s a very clever idea that’s being hatched in terms of ‘Pirates 5′ and ’6′,” he said in a joking tone. “We’re actually shooting them on the ['Pirates of the Caribbean'] ride…Just moving in circles, nonstop. Kinda like Andy Warhol’s ‘Sleep’–just close-ups on everyone. Of course, it’s logical to assume this is just a joke, But wouldn’t be hilarious if someone actually went through with...
See full article at ShockYa »

Going solo: the grinding power of the single-actor film

The recent flowering of one-actor set pieces join a tiny but diverse sub-genre exploring the sad gnaw of solitude

As the second film from the director of a low-budget sleeper hit now working with a large sum of money, Duncan Jones's Source Code has the perfect profile for a spirit-sapping let down, a CGI-laden kick in the shins. But in fact, the only small disappointment I felt about it was how its four leading actors represented a departure from the makeup of Jones's debut Moon – which apart from the occasional appearance from the likes of Matt Berry, was essentially a one-man show (that man the tireless Sam Rockwell).

Not that Jones has completely abandoned the single-character motif – amid Source Code's exploding trains and homages to The Manchurian Candidate, chunks of the story find a lone Jake Gyllenhaal hunched in a dingy airtight receptacle, that image at least providing
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

The Cinema of Narcolepsy: Certified Copy and Uncle Kent

There are films about slumber such as Andy Warhol's Sleep  (currently screening at MoMA). And there are movies focusing on sleep's byproduct, dreams: confusingly manipulated ones such as in Inception or brutally fatal ones as in the Nightmare on Elm Street series. Then there are the features that you wished you had slept through such as You, Me and Dupree, the second half of Kaboom, and every work ever directed by Thailand's Apichatpong Weerasethakul.

read more
See full article at CultureCatch »

Sliff 2010 Review: Visionaries

For many, Visionaries will feel like an incomprehensible documentary about a group of strange filmmakers who made incomprehensible films. For those who feel they may fit this description, this is your friendly .heads up. to enter into the film with an open mind and uninhibited curiosity. Every film featured in Visionaries has some meaning or purpose.

Workman interviews several groundbreaking and influential filmmakers of the experimental and avant-garde .genre. including Jonas Mekas, who serves as the film.s tour guide into the minds of cinematic artists like Stan Brakhage, Man Ray, Su Friedrich and Kenneth Anger. David Lynch offers insights as well, one of the most interesting is when he explains how when sound and images are projected together, the viewer.s mind involuntarily begins to construct a narrative. With this concept, it may be assumed that the viewer is the storyteller and each film may ultimately have an infinite number of stories it tells.
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »
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