Frequency (2000) Poster

(2000)

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8/10
Good idea, great execution
TBJCSKCNRRQTreviews22 February 2004
The idea of this film is pretty original; I don't think I've ever heard of a story so well-thought out about time-travel/alternate time-lines before. The idea is based on the main character being able to communicate with his father, who's been dead for 30 years. His father hears it then, 30 years earlier. They quickly do some things that shouldn't have happened back then, which then changes the future(or present). The movie deals very well with how they change the future back and forth. The plot is very good, the acting is superb and the characters are all believable. The special effects are very good. The very idea behind the film is very good, but the way it develops so much further is amazing. The ending, while it may seem corny too some, and is, by all means, a bit of a typical Hollywood ending(some might even call it a cop-out), but personally I just think it worked better than anything else could have. I'd recommend this to pretty much anyone who can watch a movie where they have to suspend disbelief, but especially anyone into time-travel or alternate time-lines, as this is, in my opinion, one of the best movies made, concerning this subject. 8/10
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9/10
Unique and interesting premise
rickwiese18 April 2000
This unique and interesting film is actually more of a suspense thriller than a science fiction, although I think fans of both genres will be pleased.

Dennis Quaid plays a heroic firefighter who was killed trying to rescue a runaway from a burning warehouse during the days of the Amazing Mets' World Series victory in October 1969. Jim Caviezel ("The Thin Red Line") plays his son, now a cop, thirty years later. Through some quirk of physics involving abnormal solar activity and the Aurora Borealis, the two make contact with each other across the 30-year span over a ham radio. The son is able to prevent his father's death, but changing the past also turns out to have unexpected consequences with which the two must deal.

The film really works on all levels with good action sequences and suspense, a nice dose of humor and some very touching exchanges between father and son. It explores the "what if" scenario of one's being presented with the opportunity to change an event in the past and the way in which those affected must deal with the consequences in a very intelligent and thought-provoking manner.

The acting is uniformly strong, with Quaid very appealing as the courageous firefighter and loving father who has an almost-childlike love for baseball (he even pulls off a Brooklyn accent nicely!); Caviezel is equally good as the present day version of Quaid's character's son. Caviezel brings a subtle sadness to the character, a quality one might expect from someone whose life hasn't quite worked out quite as well as it might have, possibly due to a void created by the absence of his father. One of the strongest aspects of Caviezel's performance was a subtle shift in personality following the changing of events in the past (a change which left him with memories both of his father's death and of time spent with his father in the intervening years).

I have a good feeling about this film and think it has a chance to be a real surprise hit. It's certainly one of the best films of the year thus far.
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10/10
A movie that strikes deep and stays with you
Tabby-616 May 2000
Changing the past to affect the future may not be a new concept in film, but "Frequency" handles it deftly and with heart. The acting is superb, and as far as I can tell the plot is nearly airtight. It keeps you on your toes as the story twists in what feels like six directions at once and keeps you in emotional sync with the characters. The past/present connections are stirring and intriguing, especially the single-flash cuts at pivotal moments. This is one of the few movies about which I can honestly say, "I laughed, I cried, I was scared stupid." Truly the only good movie so far this year.
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10/10
Frequency is the first good movie of the year.
dribe30 April 2000
The plot in Frequency is hard to believe, but the movie's twists, action, and dramatic moments cover up its uncertainties. The idea of how the past affects the future is not original, but the rest of the film is.

When I first saw the preview for Frequency, I thought that the idea of a son talking to a his deceased father over a radio was original and interesting. I didn't think, however, that the film would be very good. I was wrong though. The movie is packed with action, mystery, twists, and emotion. The love between the father and son is so real, as are the characters themselves.

Frequency uses remarkable use of film's ability to stretch out moments of time and intercut between different events. And as far as timing goes, this movie has stopwatch-precision. As a result, it can produce tears, outbursts of laughter, or dropping jaws in the audience.

I think the ending of the movie could be improved, but I still highly recommend seeing this film. As long as you don't worry too much about the plausibility of the time-lapse details, you'll enjoy it. After all, it's entertainment in its finest form.
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the characters make the difference in surprising "Frequency"
UnclePaul1 May 2000
Several films have deal with changing the past and the ensuing effects on the future. "Back to the Future", "Timecop", and "The Final Countdown" come immediately to mind. Director Gregory Hoblit (his "Fallen" (1998)and "Primal Fear" (1996) were both excellent) explores that theme again in "Frequency". But writer Toby Emmerich (in his first writing credit), puts a different spin on the theme. In most 'changing the past' films, a character goes back in time. In "Frequency", one main character lives in 1999 while another lives in 1969--and you see the actions in 1969 immediately affecting 1999. Sounds confusing, huh? Well, it is. But it works.

The movie opens with the introduction of the Sullivan family. Frank (Dennis Quaid) is a heroic New York firefighter, and escapes a harrowing situation to return home to his wife and his 6-year-old son John. It's an exciting time in New York, as the 'Miracle Mets' have made the World Series. Frank is a ham radio user, and a strange disturbance in the sky (solar flares, I believe. I never took astronomy) in the sky has really increased the range of his radio. "I'm reaching people I've never reached before", he says. Flash forward to 1999, when young John has grown up into a 36-year-old NY homicide detective (James Caviezel) with relational problems (and possibly a drinking problem as well). We learn his father died several years earlier in a warehouse fire, and it's obvious that John has never really gotten over it. He ends up setting up the old ham radio (did I mention that the solar flares are back?), and contacts a fellow New Yorker named Frank. It certainly won't ruin any big surprise when I tell you that it's his father Frank--in 1969. After recovering from his astonishment and convincing his father who he really is (his knowledge of the 1969 World Series proves quite helpful), they begin a series of nightly conversations. Unfortunately, their conversations change the past--and the future--in very dangerous ways. A serial killer who should only have 3 victims suddenly has more, and John must use his knowledge of the crimes (30 years old to him) to guide his dad in a 1969 pursuit of the killer. And the chase is on. Will they stop the killer? Will the solar flares last long enough for them to finish their plan? Will anyone in 1999 or 1969 believe them?

That lengthy 'plot summary' really didn't ruin any of the suspense--or come close to explaining the whole story. So, it goes without saying that the story is pretty convoluted and involved. But it's not hard to follow, and the movie grabbed me and kept me interested throughout. Granted, you will need to use a serious amount of 'suspension of disbelief'. If you get hung up on "there's no way they could be talking to each other" or "changes in the past wouldn't immediately appear in the future--they would have already happened and would have been there all along", you'll do 2 things: (1) you'll give yourself a headache, and (2) you'll miss out on a very entertaining film. The reason I gave this more stars than last week's "U-571"? I cared about the characters, and I found "Frequency" much more entertaining. Also, the story was quite original--with great use of the Miracle Mets and the 1969 World Series throughout.

Speaking of the characters--Quaid and Caviezel both do great work. Their conversations via radio are very touching and authentic (once you accept the general premise, of course). Although Quaid is a 'movie star', don't let that fool you--he's a very good (and probably underrated) actor. Just watch him as Doc Holliday in "Wyatt Earp" (1994), Remy McSwain in "The Big Easy" (1987), or Gordo Cooper in "The Right Stuff" (1983) if you don't believe me. And Caviezel's a real up-and-comer (1998's "The Thin Red Line"). He does a great job as a grieving son who is reunited (in a way) with his father, but watches his joy dissipate in the face of the mess he's created. He also believably portrays a character who has memories of the way things were, but is now bombarded with 'new' memories of the way things have become. The other characters are definitely secondary, but Elizabeth Mitchell as wife/mom Julia, and Andre Braugher (TV's "Homicide", 1998's "City of Angels", and 1989's "Glory") as Frank's policeman friend Satch are both solid.

This film has some decent action/suspense scenes, and 1999 John's radio conversation with his buddy Gordo (in 1969) is very funny. There have certainly been better action/suspense/serial killer movies (the action scenes weren't amazing, the story has some holes, and I thought the ending was a little cheesy), but the heart of the film is the relationship between Frank and John. I bought into that relationship fully, and that's why I liked this film as much as I did. And that's why I definitely recommend seeing "Frequency".
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Wow! A thriller that warms your heart!
shawng-316 April 2000
An excellent movie, what a pleasant surprise. I can't remember the last time I was in a movie where the audience applauded at the end, and at scenes during the movie, too. It could be called a thriller, but that's just a part of what the movie was about. It was filled with well placed sentimentality and timely humor. Not a moment in the movie was there a wasted scene or a time when I lost interest. Yes, a Hollywood ending, but like most good things, it's the journey not the destination that makes it worth while. I saw it at a sneak preview, and I will go see it again in general release. I highly recommend it. It's not an epic, but it is the best movie I've seen in years.
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7/10
Stand up and Cheer!!!
alley1962718 April 2000
You can't help it!! You have to cheer and applaud this movie. I can't remember the last time the whole audience clapped at the end of a movie. It has been such a long time since a movie was made that warmed your heart, while keeping you at the edge of your seat. This movie will make you laugh, get a little misty in the eyes, and you won't even notice the time. You're almost sad to see it end. Dennis Quaid is excellent, this is his best movie in years. This movie also has some new faces you won't soon forget. Don't take my word on this, see it your self. You will be thinking about this movie for weeks.
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10/10
And the summer starts off with a bang!
drew-8915 April 2000
Warning: Spoilers
Going into this film I had no idea what the true story line was. Is it a time travel film, is it a sci-fi film or is it a murder mystery? Well it's a little of each of these. Put behind you images of flying Delorians traversing through time and just let the film soak you in it's original story of what if. What if you could change history and bring back the ones you lost long ago. What if that power came with a price. Is it better to leave things as is or if given the chance to change the world you live in would you? These questions and more rise in this film that ask, would you, could you, should you. Dennis Quaid, in one of his best roles, is a fire fighter from New York in 1969. His hobby is ham radio when not rescuing people from near death in the line of duty. His son John is just a child and dreams of being a baseball player when he grows up. But in the realities of life somethings were not meant to be. John grows up and becomes a police officer working on the homicide squad in 1999, and his father never made it out of a burning building in 1969. On October 10th 1969 sun spots rise up the day before the fatal day in the warehouse. 30 years later the same event happens on the same day in 1999. John finds his fathers radio and begins to play with it and finds a man who seems to have the same call letters and last name. The sun spots allow his radio waves to traverse 30 years into the past to his father. He can save his life with the knowledge of the future and have him back in the present. This comes at a deadly price for in 1969 there is a serial killer who preys on nurses. Johns mother is a nurse. Together John and his father must stop this killer from taking more lives in a game of cat and mouse that unfolds, reverses, and progresses over the 30 year gap. Memories disappear and new ones open in there place, people survive and others die. All this leads to a fantastic final battle of old and new.

This really is a film not to be missed. Fans of thrillers, sci-fi and action will all be pleased with this film.
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10/10
Touching Father-Son Fantasy Thriller
ccthemovieman-14 November 2006
Wow, what a suspenseful film! This is a combination crime and fantasy story, a time-travel theme employed as a son is able to talk to his father 30 years in the past and help change history for the better. Far-fetched? Oh, of course, but it's not meant to be taken seriously as something that could happen. Like "Field Of Dreams," it's pure fantasy but a nice father-and-son vehicle that makes you - or at least it did me - bring a tear or two to your eyes.

The young guy is played by Jim Caviel and his dad is played by Dennis Quaid. Both are excellent and likable guys, as they usually are in the films they play. They talk to each other through an old ham radio. Through it, the son helps save his dad and mom's life on a few occasions and catch a serial-killer in the process. Well, you have to see it because explaining it just makes it sound silly. It's not; it's a fine movie and great escapist entertainment. Once you get into this story, it is impossible to put down. For New York City folks, and fans of the New York Mets, I would imagine this movie has added sentimentality.

Highly recommended.
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7/10
A real treat from an unknown director.
Spikeopath23 September 2009
An atmospheric phenomenon over New York City allows a firefighter to communicate with his son 30 years in the future via a short-wave radio. Once they establish who they are, they have little time for small talk since lives are about to be altered as they seek to influence the past. Not only that, but a serial killer known for what became known as the Nightingale Murders is now back on the scene. What have they done? What can they do? And more importantly now, who will get hurt? I personally have been delighted to find on line reviewers of this film to have been as pleasantly surprised as I was. Many have focused on the fact that they didn't know what to expect, and thus got rewarded for being in the dark as it were. So with that in mind, I'm not about to start delving into the film too much, because if you are a potential first time viewer then you really are better off going in with no expectation level. What can safely be said is that Frequency achieves a rare feat of successfully blending genres and thematics. Sci-fi, mystery, fantasy, thriller, crime and drama all come into play in unknown director Gregory Hoblit's film. Nicely written by Toby Emmerich, the film also benefits from its fine cast of actors. Leading man is Dennis Quaid, who might just be one of the most safest go to guys in his generation, and support comes from a pre-Jesus James Caviezel, Andre Braugher, Shawn Doyle and Elizabeth Mitchell.

Frequency is heartily recommended to those who don't need head twisting cinema before they can proclaim a film to be worthy of their time. Yes some things of course defy logic here, this is after all a fantasy led film. But with so many interesting themes going on amongst the cross time molded core, Frequency rises above any charge of being merely popcorn fodder. Smart, warm and exciting, see this one if you can. 7.5/10
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8/10
A complex, thought provoking thriller that is well acted and directed. ***1/2 out of ****.
Movie-1225 May 2000
FREQUENCY / (2000) ***1/2

It' 1999. Jim Caviezel stars as John Sullivan, a detective whose life is falling apart. Recently, he has split up from his girlfriend, he and his police partner Satch (Andre Braugher), are unable to solve a serial murder case that has been reopened due to the discovery of skeletal remains of a past victim. The thirty year anniversary of the death of his firefighter father (Dennis Quaid), is also approaching. John is beginning to sink in a pit of despair.

One night John stumbles upon his dad's old ham radio. He makes an effort to get the machine to power up once again. When he does and begins conversations with another operator, however, he realizes the person he is communicating with is his long dead father. Somehow, due to the presence of the Northern Lights, John is able to transmit back in time to 1969 and literally alter the course of his existence.

The concept of time traveling communication may seem far-fetched to some, and "Frequency" is a little hard to grasp at times, especially when the film never directly explains why the father and son are able to talk with each other through time. Notwithstanding, the production works as a science fiction thriller with supernatural overtones. While the filmmakers do succeed in convincingly constructing "Frequency," most audiences might have to leave logic at the theater entrance before viewing it.

"Frequency" is a well-structured motion picture; the movie is focused throughout. Although its story changes pace at different periods, for the most part the audience can follow along with the characters. This is a movie with a complicated and challenging story. Because of the film's complexity, we are enormously involved, if slightly confused. Screenwriter Tobias Emmerich links original and fresh feeling material here. Gregory Hoblit produces the right amount of action and suspense, combined with gentle emotions, to generate a film we have not seen before.

Dennis Quaid and James Caviezel are the perfect choices for the principal characters. Quaid performs with intriguing tension and appropriate receptivity. Caviezel dazzles with intricacy and dexterity. Offering refined supporting roles are Andre Braugher ("City of Angels", "Get on the Bus") and Noah Emmerich ("The Truman Show") who furnishes some light-hearted material as John's best friend.

Director Gregory Hoblit ("Fallen," "Primal Fear") clearly executes topics on screen. This film is overflowing with ideas and contains enough plot for a television series. However, "Frequency" is not without flaws. Sullivan's chaotic life is only vaguely portrayed. Although we do care for the character, more development would increase the relationship between the audience and he. Some of the make-up effects depicting age differences were disgraceful. Andre Braugher appeared as if his make up artists were straight out of junior high, slapping too much pancake cream plaster on him. The film's contrived climax concludes with a formalistic fight instead of continuing its battle of wits.

Despite a few unacceptable external problems, internally this is a very effective production. As a whole, "Frequency" contains a very encompassing story and places interesting characters in engaging circumstances. The movie is definitely worthy of recognition, but do not view it unless you plan on thoroughly discussing it afterwards.
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8/10
Great!
sedlacek1-305-2100861 March 2012
The movie opens with the introduction of the Sullivan family. Frank (Dennis Quaid) is a heroic New York firefighter, and escapes a harrowing situation to return home to his wife and his 6-year-old son John. It's an exciting time in New York, as the 'Miracle Mets' have made the World Series. Frank is a ham radio user, and a strange disturbance in the sky (solar flares, I believe. I never took astronomy) in the sky has really increased the range of his radio. "I'm reaching people I've never reached before", he says. Flash forward to 1999, when young John has grown up into a 36-year-old NY homicide detective (James Caviezel) with relational problems (and possibly a drinking problem as well). We learn his father died several years earlier in a warehouse fire, and it's obvious that John has never really gotten over it. He ends up setting up the old ham radio (did I mention that the solar flares are back?), and contacts a fellow New Yorker named Frank. It certainly won't ruin any big surprise when I tell you that it's his father Frank--in 1969. After recovering from his astonishment and convincing his father who he really is (his knowledge of the 1969 World Series proves quite helpful), they begin a series of nightly conversations. Unfortunately, their conversations change the past--and the future--in very dangerous ways. A serial killer who should only have 3 victims suddenly has more, and John must use his knowledge of the crimes (30 years old to him) to guide his dad in a 1969 pursuit of the killer. And the chase is on. Will they stop the killer? Will the solar flares last long enough for them to finish their plan? Will anyone in 1999 or 1969 believe them? That lengthy 'plot summary' really didn't ruin any of the suspense--or come close to explaining the whole story. So, it goes without saying that the story is pretty convoluted and involved. But it's not hard to follow, and the movie grabbed me and kept me interested throughout. Granted, you will need to use a serious amount of 'suspension of disbelief'. If you get hung up on "there's no way they could be talking to each other" or "changes in the past wouldn't immediately appear in the future--they would have already happened and would have been there all along", you'll do 2 things: (1) you'll give yourself a headache, and (2) you'll miss out on a very entertaining film. The reason I gave this more stars than last week's "U-571"? I cared about the characters, and I found "Frequency" much more entertaining. Also, the story was quite original--with great use of the Miracle Mets and the 1969 World Series throughout.
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Twister
tedg25 May 2000
How far we've come! In the old days a final plot twist was a surprise, with the best being a surprise insight. Remember `No Way Out?' More recently we've had end twist insights that reinterpret the movie. In that case, what you learn at the end has you going over the whole film as you leave, wondering about which of your prior understandings need to be modified: `Sixth Sense,' and `Usual Suspects' come to mind.

But in those cases, the film is a story apart from your perception of it. Here now we have a story where your reinvention of what you know changes the story from the perspective of both you the viewer and the hero in the film. And it doesn't just happen at the end, but all through the last half. A new high in self-reference and experimentation with the role of the viewer in the narrative.

Worth seeing for this step in the evolution of the art.
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8/10
A Most Unusual Fantasy-Action Film
mike4812828 February 2013
Warning: Spoilers
This movie moves fast. There are so many things thrown at you that watching the movie with subtitles is almost mandatory. First we are told that it's because of solar flares and the Aurora Borealis. Somehow, that event and a "ham" radio enable a father and son to talk to each other through the time gap of 30 years. It's a time travel movie without anyone actually traveling through time! The son tells his father what to do to avoid dying in a warehouse fire and that sets off a series of "ripples in time" that change everything. His dad lives on but his mother dies. She is killed by "The Nightingale Serial Killer." That's not supposed to happen! Through a series of actions,dad is able to thwart this otherwise inevitable event. But as one thing is changed, it sets off an unpredictable chain of events that could not have been anticipated. Extremely well written until the happy climax where everyone lives and only the murderer dies, in two time periods, simultaneously! That is the paradox of the movie: how can the same person get his arm shot off in the past yet survive and die 30 years in the future? Wouldn't he have bleed to death? At that point, the movie wraps up with breakneck speed and we are left both "dazed and confused," watching everyone play baseball! My theory is that the radio was somehow the time-link; more so than the atmospheric phenomenon. However, the movie manages to satisfy on several emotional levels, especially the ability to speak to a loved one that we miss so dearly. There is a "haunting" quality to the film that makes you want to watch it more than once. Cutting-edge special effects. Rated PG-13: graphic and intense content.
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7/10
Good film!
grantchelsey542 February 2012
Going into this film I had no idea what the true story line was. Is it a time travel film, is it a sci-fi film or is it a murder mystery? Well it's a little of each of these. Put behind you images of flying Delorians traversing through time and just let the film soak you in it's original story of what if. What if you could change history and bring back the ones you lost long ago. What if that power came with a price. Is it better to leave things as is or if given the chance to change the world you live in would you? These questions and more rise in this film that ask, would you, could you, should you. Dennis Quaid, in one of his best roles, is a fire fighter from New York in 1969. His hobby is ham radio when not rescuing people from near death in the line of duty. His son John is just a child and dreams of being a baseball player when he grows up. But in the realities of life somethings were not meant to be. John grows up and becomes a police officer working on the homicide squad in 1999, and his father never made it out of a burning building in 1969. On October 10th 1969 sun spots rise up the day before the fatal day in the warehouse. 30 years later the same event happens on the same day in 1999. John finds his fathers radio and begins to play with it and finds a man who seems to have the same call letters and last name. The sun spots allow his radio waves to traverse 30 years into the past to his father. He can save his life with the knowledge of the future and have him back in the present. This comes at a deadly price for in 1969 there is a serial killer who preys on nurses. Johns mother is a nurse. Together John and his father must stop this killer from taking more lives in a game of cat and mouse that unfolds, reverses, and progresses over the 30 year gap. Memories disappear and new ones open in there place, people survive and others die. All this leads to a fantastic final battle of old and new.
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8/10
Review of "Frequency"
compi2411 August 2011
Director Gregory Hoblit brings us "Frequency", an intriguing science-fiction tale that was as thrilling and shocking as it was heartfelt and emotional. The movie is about John Sullivan (Caviezel) a Cop who has never recovered from the death of his father, Frank (Quaid). However, after a series of miraculous cosmic events, John is given a chance to communicate with his father in the past. Now, when I initially examined this film for what it was - a movie with a respectable premise, but directed by a guy I had never heard of, and starring a group of actors who aren't really well-known - I was rather apprehensive about watching it. Though, after actually watching "Frequency" I can say that my expectations were pretty much demolished. What threw me for a loop was the direction that this movie took. All I expected "Frequency" to be was a long, drawn out reunion between a father and his grief-stricken son (which sounded to good to me. . .but didn't really sound spectacular). But, about a third of the way in, "Frequency" turned into a very intense crime thriller. That being said, the film excels at interweaving thrills and poignancy without making the transitions feel jarring. The acting was very well executed I'd say, for you learn to feel for both Frank and John Sullivan as "Frequency"'s intriguing plot thickens. The script was pretty well-written too. Overall, I'd say that "Frequency" was an entertaining sci-fi flick that offered a variety of gratifying elements within it.
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8/10
stays with you for years after you forget what it was about
pieopah-130 January 2011
This is a nice and in some ways unique movie.

It is closer to myth/fairytale then SF, and it's premise may turn off some audience. It also starts slow and at some points it's better to not reason about its events.

Nonetheless, it's very well told movie with great suspense, heartwarming moments and some unexpected turns.

It also has subtle hints about an importance of a proximity and about how we take many things for granted, while they may in fact change in any moment.

You will probably not remember its plot, but you may feel good about it for quite long time.
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9/10
Frequency is something everyone should tune into.
Jerique15 January 2009
Warning: Spoilers
Dennis Quaid leads the great cast in this rocking' tale about how one event can shape the future for destruction or construction.

Frank Sullivan an amazing veteran firefighter enjoys watching the thrills of the 'Mazin Mets in the 1969 World Series with his wife Julia (Elizabeth Mitchell) and his son, John. In a flash forward to 1999, John (Jim Caviezel) a 36-year old detective who gave up baseball when his father died in The 1969 Baxton fire. After his neighbor Gordo (Noah Emmerich) and his son force John to set-up his father's old ham radio, John discovers that he can talk to Frank. He eventually warns his dad about the Baxton fire and thus, his father survives. The result of the change causes the Nightingale serial murderer (Shawn Doyle) to target Julia as his next victim. Frank and John have to work together to change the past in order to save the future.

The story, similar to Back To the Future, is incredible. It grabs a hold of you and keeps you on the edge of your seat while it twists and turns you around. The characters are real and inspiring. The acting is superb. There's romance, comedy, action and sci-fi; something for everyone. It's a great film and shows us what heroes are made of. Another legendary performance from Dennis Quaid.
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7/10
A classic sci-fi mystery premise with solid delivery
Movie_Muse_Reviews18 June 2008
"Frequency" is a film that finds a really easy way to your heart and keeps you captivated with a great mystery premise. If you're a sucker for time-travel films, you'll like this one right away. There's something about a son getting to talk to his dead father 30 years in the past and getting a second chance that is unavoidably likable.

John Sullivan (Jim Caviezel) is a homicide detective who comes across his father's old hamm radio. He makes a friend only to find that friend is actually his father (Dennis Quaid) 30 years ago, the same year that he died. After some convincing that it's all real, John explains to his father, a firefighter, that he dies trying to save someone on one particular job. When John saves his father's life, however, it alters the future and all of a sudden the Nightengale murders John has been researching become a bit personal.

The premise is unscratchable. A father and son speaking to each other through some strange time discrepancy, working together for a second chance for their family that was devastated by the accident. Caviezel and Quaid are great actors and they sell it well, even in their talk of of the 1969 Mets. It's a great father and son film, to say the very least about it.

The mystery element is nothing completely original and special, but for what this movie is really about, it doesn't particularly matter. This is just a really well-executed movie that understands what kind of film it is and doesn't try to go beyond that.
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9/10
Wonderfully engaging, even on repeat viewings
MovieLuvaMatt20 June 2003
"Frequency" is very underrated! I loved this movie when I saw it in theaters. I saw it twice on cable, and now that I bought the DVD, I watched it again. I was just as intrigued as when I watched it the first time! Needless to say, the premise is extremely original. I seem to always connect well with films involving father/son relationships, since I don't have an ideal relationship with my father. So it was really sweet to watch a film about a guy communicating with his deceased father, and watching them bond and chat about the All-American game. Not only is it a touching drama, but it's also an exciting thriller. Director Gregory Hoblit and writer Toby Emmerich couldn't have done much to make the film better.

Dennis Quaid and Jim Caviezel both deliver great, spirited performances. I always notice more and more flaws in Quaid's New York accent in repeat viewings, but his acting is terrific nonetheless. Andre Braugher gives another strong performance as Satch. And the actor who plays the villain is quite creepy.

I would expect that after seeing the movie a couple times, the ending would no longer make me cry, but the ending STILL chokes me up! As a matter of fact, I'm about to cry just thinking about it. I'm by no means a fan of country music, but I felt Garth Brooks' song beautifully fit the film's tone.

Tired of seeing movie's with the same plots and the same outcomes? I promise that won't be the case when you watch "Frequency." Sure, some elements of plot may be hard to swallow, since they range from a little far-fetched to very far-fetched, but at least the writer showed great imagination. That's more than I can say for most of the Hollywood screenwriters out there.

My score: 9 (out of 10)
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10/10
This touching thriller keeps you on the edge of your seat with a tissue in your hand.
beccalyn3 December 2001
There are not enough movies that you can leave feeling touched, refreshed, and enlightened. So many films today don't bother to build strong characters that have a lasting effect. Frequency is such a wonderful movie because it incorporates a realistic father-son bond, and raw emotion into an action thriller. I must admit that I am not particularly drawn to action movies, but after seeing Frequency I have tried to change my attitude.

Jim Caviezel and Dennis Quaid are extremely believable as a son and his long-dead father. Caviezel's character cried when he first talked to his father that had been dead for thirty years. I cried, too, as he so believably yearned to be with his dad.

Another great thing about this movie is how intriguing the action sequences are. Not only are the usual chase scenes exciting, but the interesting psychological aspects of the movie also work extremely well.

If you have not seen Frequency, please do so, it is an excellent movie and I doubt you will regret seeing it. Although seeing it in a theater is the ideal place, the DVD is almost the same. You should enjoy this movie, it is a true classic, and I know I will never tire of watching it.
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6/10
A Good Sci-Fi Film
moviewizguy1 January 2007
This film is about John Sullivan who can communicate to his dad, Frank Sullivan, 30 years in the past. Having manage to save his dad's life, the two must fix all the bad things that have resulted from the saving of Frank.

This is a good sci-fi thriller that is like a father and son movie. Dennis Quaid and James Caviezel's performances are great, including others.

I like how the time effects used in this film in which two people in two different time periods (reminds me of The Lake House), changing things in the past which changes the present and creating more problems.

This film has mystery, action, thrills, and emotion between the father and son. It has great performances and is a good sci-fi thriller. If you like these kinds of films, watch it.
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7/10
If I Let Myself Go, This Film Was Pretty Good
gavin69425 March 2006
Warning: Spoilers
An accidental cross-time radio link connects father (Dennis Quaid) and son (Jim Caviezel) across 30 years. The son tries to save his father's life, but then must fix the consequences.

Let me preface this review by saying this film is loaded with anachronisms and time travel flaws, if we assume time to be logical. These holes were glaringly obvious. But if I disregard these things and just look at how well the film entertained me, it is definitely one of the better time travel films out there.

Dennis Quaid is the father, Jesus is the son. Perhaps that makes Quaid God, but I think that might be a stretch. He is Joseph at best. Initially, the goal is to save the father from dying in a fire... but once that goal is accomplished, why not do more? Save more lives, maybe read off some winning lottery numbers. The plot shifts drastically about a third of the way in, but then gets actually better.

The best parts of this movie are the father tracking down a killer, trying to stop him before he kills nurses (thus gaining himself the nickname the Nightingale Killer). Using facts from the crime after the fact, he is easily able to know where and when the killer will strike. The film then becomes an interesting detective story as well as a heart-warming family tale. (Some of the family stuff is a bit hard to believe... way too much love going on here.)

Look close (not too close) and you will see a young Michael Cera as Gordo Junior. This is three years before Cera broke out with "Arrested Development" (and went on to much bigger things from there), though he had done previous acting roles by this point in things you probably never saw.

Of course this film is recommended. If you are too much of a stick-in-the-butt and you can only focus on the flaws, you will be frustrated with this film. But, come on! Sometimes fantasy is just fantasy. Why let science ruin a good story?
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9/10
Blending "Back to the Future" with pot-boiler murder mystery
S.R. Dipaling25 February 2006
This film I've seen at least three times and always found myself enjoying it immensely each time. I gave this film a 9,but in truth,I would've probably rounded up to either a 9.5 or 10,my only reservations being that this being a "time-travel" movie(or type thereof),it causes some amounts of credibility to be stretched due to an almost linear sense of coincidence. I'd elaborate on this,but that would give away this flick,and I'd just as soon NOT give away any spoilers to this or any film I'm reviewing. Not if I can help it anyways.

Det.JOhn Sullivan(Jim CAviezel,who,regardless of what you think of he personally,NEVER over or under plays his characters in film,and this movie is one of the best showcases of his talents) stumbles upon a old ham radio in his folks' house that he now lives in since his mother retired. He finds out that not only does the radio work,but that he can communicate with his father Frank(Dennis Quaid,here excellent), a NYC fireman who's been dead for over thirty years. NAturally skeptical at first,when Sullivan discovers that he can communicate through time to his dad,he figures a way to save his father from the way he dies(which happens to be on the job,rescuing someone from a burning building). The joy of bringing back his dad from an unfortunate fate unleashes another terrible fate,this time to his loving mother(a warmly beautiful and sympathetic Elizabeth Mitchell),and now Sullivan has to again team with his dad,through space and time,to correct that outcome as well.

A stirring supporting performance by Andre Braugher(one of my faves from TV's "HOmicide")as a longtime family friend of the Sullivans,mixed with a deft script and alert,capable direction by Gregory Hoblitt,is able to make this film into something a little more than a sci-fi/fantasy tale OR a murder/thriller suspense caper. It is one of those rare films that is as good to see on a big screen for main price or as a cheap rent! Contrivances aside,I really got my money's worth watching this movie and highly recommend it!
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7/10
For a movie I hadn't heard of, this was quite good
Danny_G1322 March 2005
Pseudo time travel thriller manages to *almost* be believable while delivering an exciting story which grips the viewer.

Dennis Quaid and Jesus himself (Jim Caviezel) star as father and son in a movie about causality. Frequency's vehicle is that the 2 manage to communicate through time, the father being in 1969 and the son in 1999. The idea put forth to explain this rather implausible phenomenon is that Aurora Borealis (The Northern Lights) are managing to interfere with radio signals somehow allowing signals from different time periods to come together.

Using this useful tool, the son, John Sullivan, tries to save his father's life by telling him he will die in a warehouse fire in the line of his duty as a fireman. The father, Frank, takes his advice to avoid death and is amazed when it works.

Obviously causality isn't finished and proceeds to add more layers of events to the story meaning that when you mess with the future, you change more than just what you think you affect.

This movie is great fun. It never takes itself especially seriously, and everyone appears to be having a decent time here. Dennis Quaid's Frank has a quiet authority which suits him well, and although his overly southern accent seems a mite contrived to start with, we get used to it. Caviezel, as his grown up son from the future, is pretty decent here too. He comes across as a man who's a bit lost, but when he gets a chance to talk to his father (Who died 30 years ago, hence saving his life) through time, he suddenly seems to have a purpose.

All the other players contribute pretty well as well, but this is really the Quaid and Caviezel show.

The direction is pretty good too, never getting in the way of a good yarn. It aids the flow really well and manages the old 'edge of your seat' effect well.

The only *real* flaw in this is the quite appallingly sugar-sweet ending. It's so sentimental that it incites nauseum. A feel-good ending is only going to work when it's not overplayed and when it uses subtlety. Trying to force the old 'this is a good ending, folks' motto on the viewer leaves a sickly taste in the mouth.

But fortunately the rest of the movie's quality lets it stand on its own 2 feet, and the ending fails to ruin it.

Overall, not bad, not bad at all.
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