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Pollock (2000)

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A film about the life and career of the American painter, Jackson Pollock.

Director:

Writers:

(book), (book) | 2 more credits »
Won 1 Oscar. Another 2 wins & 9 nominations. See more awards »

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
... Jackson Pollock
... Sande Pollock
Molly Regan ... Arloie Pollock
... Lee Krasner
... Stella Pollock
... Arloie's Baby (as Eulala Grace Harden)
Matthew Sussman ... Reuben Kadish
... Howard Putzel
... Peggy Guggenheim
Everett Quinton ... James Johnson Sweeney
... May Rosenberg
... Harold Rosenberg
... Tony Smith
Kenny Scharf ... William Baziotes
Tom McGuinness ... Franz Kline
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Storyline

A portrayal of a mental illness living in an artist or an artist living with mental illness; alcohol was the self prescribed medication. Obviously what threw pollack over the edge was the end of his 15 minutes of fame. Sad that an artists worth only appreciates after there is no more production. Typically the ego is so inflated after the galactic interlude, the spiral into normalcy is self destructive. I've seen it happen in people not so famous, but equally talented in their profession.

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Taglines:

A True Portrait of Life and Art.

Genres:

Biography | Drama

Motion Picture Rating (MPAA)

Rated R for language and brief sexuality | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

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Details

Official Sites:

Sony Pictures Classics

Country:

Language:

Release Date:

23 March 2001 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

Pollock, o asymvivastos  »

Filming Locations:

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Box Office

Budget:

$6,000,000 (estimated)

Opening Weekend USA:

$44,244, 17 December 2000, Limited Release

Gross USA:

$8,596,914, 22 July 2001

Cumulative Worldwide Gross:

$10,558,970, 31 December 2001
See more on IMDbPro »

Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Color:

Aspect Ratio:

1.85 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

Filming took a mere 50 days with a six-week layoff after forty days so Ed Harris could take time to gain thirty pounds and grow a beard. See more »

Goofs

As the documentary filmmaker is filming Pollock painting, Pollock's footwear changes from "painting boots" to shoes and back to boots. See more »

Quotes

[first lines]
Jackson Pollock: [drunk] Who's the greatest drummer in the world?
Sande Pollock: What?
Jackson Pollock: Krupa
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Connections

References Works of Calder (1950) See more »

Soundtracks

Get with the Beat
Written by Billy Nix and Harry Glenn
Performed by Billy Nix
Courtesy of Rykodisc
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User Reviews

 
As vivid and real as Hollywood is likely to make about the painter
28 August 2010 | by See all my reviews

Pollock (2000)

There's no question this is a well made film, and based pretty much on truth, and an interesting truth--the life of a great Abstract Expressionist. Some would say the greatest of them all.

For myself, this isn't enough, and I know this is me. I'm an art critic and professor of Art in my real life, and I'm never very patient with movies about artists. The reason isn't that there are inaccuracies, but that there is a subtle or not-subtle goal of aggrandizing the subject. This reaches a beautiful but, again, romanticized, peak when Pollock makes his famous break into true gestural, raw work in a large commissioned piece for Peggy Guggenheim (who is portrayed, oddly, as a shy and dull sort, which I've never pictured). Then later he makes his drip works. And then he dies, again over dramatized and made aesthetic, as tragic and ugly as it had to have been in life.

If you want to really get into Pollock's head, especially if you aren't already a fan (I love Pollock's work), this is a convincing movie. At the helm as both director and playing the artist is Ed Harris. He is especially believable as a painter, which is something of an important point. This isn't like those movies about musicians where the actor is clearly not playing. Harris actually paints the darned thing, the big masterpiece, on the cusp of the drip works. I don't know if Harris was drinking, too, but he's a good drunk, and of course Pollock was a better drinker than a painter, even.

It's a cheap shot to say a movie could have been shorter, but this one sure would have propelled better with less atmosphere, less filler that is meant to create his life but is interesting only as an illustration of historical facts. It wore me thin for those reasons. Again, it might be a matter of how much you can get sucked into the given drama that is Jackson Pollock's life. It was quite a life, crude, untempered, brave, and immensely connected to what matters as an artist.


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