8.1/10
303,695
653 user 70 critic

Family Guy 

Trailer
0:47 | Trailer
In a wacky Rhode Island town, a dysfunctional family strive to cope with everyday life as they are thrown from one crazy scenario to another.
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Popularity
197 ( 21)

Episodes

Seasons


Years



21   20   19   18   17   16   15   14   13   … See all »
2022   2021   2020   2019   2018   2017   … See all »
Won 9 Primetime Emmys. Another 28 wins & 101 nominations. See more awards »

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Cast

Complete series cast summary:
Seth MacFarlane ...  Peter Griffin / ... 359 episodes, 1999-2021
Alex Borstein ...  Lois Griffin / ... 359 episodes, 1999-2021
Seth Green ...  Chris Griffin / ... 359 episodes, 1999-2021
Mila Kunis ...  Meg Griffin / ... 349 episodes, 1999-2021
Mike Henry ...  Cleveland Brown / ... 342 episodes, 1999-2021
John Viener ...  TV Announcer / ... 285 episodes, 2005-2020
Danny Smith Danny Smith ...  TV Announcer / ... 262 episodes, 1999-2021
Patrick Warburton ...  Joe Swanson / ... 257 episodes, 1999-2020
Ralph Garman ...  Various / ... 221 episodes, 2001-2021
Alec Sulkin ...  Jesus Christ / ... 211 episodes, 2005-2020
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Storyline

Sick, twisted and politically incorrect, the animated series features the adventures of the Griffin family. Endearingly ignorant Peter and his stay-at-home wife Lois reside in Quahog, R.I., and have three kids. Meg, the eldest child, is a social outcast, and teenage Chris is awkward and clueless when it comes to the opposite sex. The youngest, Stewie, is a genius baby bent on killing his mother and destroying the world. The talking dog, Brian, keeps Stewie in check while sipping martinis and sorting through his own life issues. Written by Jwelch5742

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Taglines:

Don't Die Laughing. We Could Get Sued (Season 4). See more »

Genres:

Animation | Comedy

Certificate:

TV-14 | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

View content advisory »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

Before Seth MacFarlane created the idea of a regular half-hour series, he conceived of the Griffin family appearing as characters in animated shorts to appear on MADtv (1995). Many of the regular voice actors and actresses (including Alex Borstein, Phil LaMarr, Debra Wilson, and Nicole Sullivan) are MADtv alumni. Alex Borstein was the first cast on this show, and is the only "official" cast member as the voice of Lois Griffin. See more »

Goofs

The Griffin's front window sometimes has 4 panes, and other times it's one piece of glass. See more »

Quotes

Guy on Street #2: It's 3:00. Where the hell is Louie?
Guy on Street #1: Well, you tell me. Louie left his house at 2:15 and had to travel a distance 6.2 miles traveling at a rate of five miles a hour. When will Louie get here?
Guy On Street #2: Depends if he stops to see his ho.
Guy on Street #1: That's what we call a "variable".
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Crazy Credits

Every few seasons, the instrumental version of the title theme that plays over the end credits is replaced with a new arrangement. To date there have been 5 main arrangements of the closing credits theme (this, of course, does not include "one-shot" versions that are relative to a specific episode.) See more »

Alternate Versions

Some episodes air in a somewhat-edited version in their original FOX airings and syndicated airings, but air in a racier, "uncut" version on Adult Swim, with some extra scenes or alternate versions of scenes. However, Adult Swim still bleeps the most profane of language. See more »

Connections

Referenced in Hollywood Game Night: 7 Seconds of Kressley (2020) See more »

Soundtracks

Lucky There's A Family Guy
Music by Walter Murphy
Lyrics by David Zuckerman and Seth MacFarlane
Performed by Seth MacFarlane, Alex Borstein, Seth Green and Mila Kunis
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User Reviews

MacFarlane's brilliant sitcom parody was once one of the funniest things on TV, but now it may suffer the same creative fate as the Simpsons
12 August 2007 | by liquidcelluloid-1See all my reviews

Network: Fox; Genre: Animated Comedy, Satire, Parody; Content Rating: TV-14 (pervasive sexual content, scatological humor, strong language, violence, animated nudity); Perspective: Contemporary (star range: 1-5);

Season Reviewed: 5 seasons

After 5 seasons, two cancellations and a now militant army of fans the show has amassed, I don't quite know what to say about "Family Guy" anymore.

When "Family Guy" debuted in 1999 it was a shotgun blast of comic brilliance that came out of nowhere and went unheard by an audience still enraptured by the antics of "Friends". At first it all appears relatively routine, even - as many have accused - a ripe-off of "The Simpsons". Fat, child-like, head of household Peter Griffin (voiced by creator Seth MacFarlane) screws things up while dotting wife Lois (Alex Borstein), put-upon daughter Meg (Mila Kunis) and genetic copy Chris (Seth Green) look on. Also in the mix is genius, homicidal infant Stewie (MacFarlene) - one of the most deserving break-out characters in TV history - and Brian, the family's talking dog.

If the characters sound like clichés, that's the point. MacFarlane uses them simply as vessels and with the show regurgitates every pop culture childhood memory to create a full-length parody of 70s and 80s sitcoms. Even better than a parody, a satire. Just as Archie Bunker was a product of the 50s being imposed on by a changing 70s culture, "Family Guy" is about the new millennial values juxtaposed on sitcom camp of the last century. In MacFarlane's world there are child molesters on "Lost in Space" and "Eight is Enough" actually refers to disciplinary beatings.

Yes, "The Simpsons" have covered similar ground, with a particular emphasis on random flashbacks and fantasy scenes. But with "The Simpsons" in a creative tailspin for the last decade, MacFarlane and crew swoop in to fill this gaping void. To out-Simpson "The Simpsons" if you will. What MacFarlane brings to the table is pitch-perfect comic timing - an ability to know how quick to cut or how long to drag out a particular bit to get the laugh. As well as utter fearlessness. From bits in which Jesus Christ turns water "into funk" or a TV parody "Gumble 2 Gumble: Beach Justice" staring Greg and Bryant Gumble as bicycle cops, "Guy" isn't just one of the funniest things to grace TV, it was freakin' brilliant. This breaks from are more often like an animated version of "The Far Side", then "The Simpsons".

Then it was canceled only to be renewed at the 11th hour. And then it was canceled again, brought back supposedly by strong DVD sales. But given the networks ownership of the show and how Fox beat to death the equally strong "Futurama", it's hard to buy that. This constant shakeup has got to take a toll on a series' rhythm. When the show returned for a 3rd season it felt lacking of something. As if the network notes to "slow the pace", "tone down the fantasy scenes" and "thicken the story lines" were rigidly being followed when the breaking of these rules was what made the show great in the first place. Still it contained classics like "Emission: Impossible", "The Thin White Line", "Road to Rhode Island" and "Brian Wallows, Peter's Swallows" to keep us satisfied.

Upon the 2nd return, giving us seasons 4, 5 and beyond, the show has completely lost it's footing. After a LONG agonizing wait, the 4th season premiere is a disappointing "North by Northwest"/"Passion of the Christ" parody. The rest of the season follows suit in which only "PTV", the show's satire of the TV ratings system, recaptures it's prior lunacy. MacFarlane makes the crucial mistake here, actually wanting us to care about them. Given that they where envisioned as clichés in the first place, putting the weight of a story on their backs only shows how lacking the show is for character depth. Even Stewie, once a source for huge laughs, is stripped down to a single latent homosexuality joke. The show gets story heavy where it shouldn't. Slows down when it should speed up. Goes broad when it should go cult. Gets political and angry when it should be mindless escapism. "Family Guy" was about velocity, randomness and obscure 1% gags.

I won't go as far as to say that "Family Guy" beyond seasons 4 and 5 is proof that a dead show should probably remain dead. But it is proof that a show can't go through constant cancellations and reshuffling and remain intact. It also suffers from the same fate that has plagued "The Simpsons". It is full of itself. It has become lazy in a belief that it can do no wrong in the eyes of it's fans. "Family Guy", in many ways, has sold out. It isn't the acerbic TV rebel it used to be. It is now part of the system itself

"Guy's" humor has a masterful ability to appeal to "Star Trek" nerds and drunken frat boys alike. And it is hard to deny the TV geek in my doesn't flip out when they do something half of either audience won't get like weave a "Star Wars" joke into a "Curb Your Enthusiasm" reference. But the show's die-hard legions of fans (some damn near sycophantic over the show's brilliance) have allowed it to be lazy and complacent and paved the way for MacFarlane's head to slide right up his own posterior. In some ways he deserves it, the show can still be very, very funny. But the true fans out there know that it can do much, much better.

* * * ½ / 5


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Details

Official Sites:

Fox.com | Official Facebook | See more »

Country:

USA

Language:

English | Portuguese

Release Date:

31 January 1999 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

Padre de familia See more »

Filming Locations:

Los Angeles, California, USA

Company Credits

Show more on IMDbPro »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Dolby Digital | Stereo

Color:

Color

Aspect Ratio:

16:9 HD
See full technical specs »

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